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Parents Blog

Susan Boyd blogs on USYouthSoccer.org every Monday.  A dedicated mother and wife, Susan offers a truly unique perspective into the world of a "Soccer Mom". 

 

Watch the game

Susan Boyd

Professional soccer hits its stride in the spring. Feb. 28 was the Carling Cup won by Manchester United. May 15 was the FA Cup won by Chelsea. May 22 is the UEFA Cup played between Inter Milan and Bayern Munich – which will be decided before you read this blog but after I wrote it! And on June 12 the World Cup begins in South Africa. While the majority of youth players won't have the privilege of playing in any of these events and most won't even have a chance to see one of these matches live, youth players and their families should still make these and other professional games part of their TV viewing schedule.

I'm supposing many in America will watch the U.S. team play their three group games in the World Cup which kicks off against England June 12 at 2:30 p.m. (ET) on ABC.   The England team may be strong enough to win the Cup, so that game in particular should hold some exciting possibilities for American fans. The U.S. doesn't need to beat England to advance, although they do need to beat the other two in their group. But beating England would certainly up the stock for respect by the soccer community. The U.S. is ranked 14th in the world while England is ranked 8th, so there's a chance for an upset. Despite loyalty and expectations, watching the World Cup shouldn't be limited to the U.S. matches.

Many of the world's greatest players return to their home countries to compete in the World Cup. Didier Drogba, the stand-out player on Chelsea, plays for the Ivory Coast. You might not consider looking for the Ivory Coast games in the World Cup schedule, but that team will provide some of the best soccer you'll see. Overshadowed by the Cameroon and Nigerian teams they have fought their way up to a respectable 4th place in the African continental rankings with some strong victories in the months leading up to the World Cup, including a 3-1 win over Ghana. Other players of note should encourage us to watch more than just the U.S.: Samuel Eto'o from Cameroon a member of the UEFA finalist Inter Milan, Mark Schwarzer from Australia a member of Fulham UEFA Cup runners-up, and Theofanis Gekas from Greece, a member of Eintracht Frankfurt and the top European World Cup qualifier goal scorer.

Youth players and their parents should make it a regular habit to watch as many professional games as possible. Developing that keen eye and inherent understanding of the sport through consistent exposure to the highest level of play remains an essential component to both succeeding at and loving the game. Parents can benefit through a clearer understanding of the rules and how far rough play can go before referees make a call. Watching replays of fouls, goals, questionable play, outstanding play, and set plays helps both youth players and parents appreciate the nuances and requirements of the game. Most of us didn't play the sports we watch but we understand them because we watch them so often. 

When families watch professional soccer games on a regular basis it helps establish the legitimacy of and respect for the sport. If we send the message that soccer isn't worth watching then we also send the message that it isn't worth playing. Kids need to know that their choices are considered significant and valuable. Sitting down and enjoying a game together gives that support unambiguously to the player. In addition there's that aspect of bonding over a game that I've always thought justifies the hours of soccer viewing that goes on in my household.  Maybe I'm just rationalizing so I don't have to feel so badly that the grass isn't getting mowed or the screens aren't being replaced. But I do believe for the really big games, those memories of sharing the moment with one another outweigh some of the chores.

Here are links to the TV schedules for upcoming soccer games. Take the time to click on them, print them off, and then decide which ones you'll watch as a family. I can guarantee not only some serious thrills, but also some excellent insights to this game the world loves.
 
 
 
 

Technique and Injury

Sam Snow

A coach from the Midwest had these comments and question about a soccer injury.

"I've had a client come to me with some injury/rehab issues attributed to ball striking and playing the long ball. This is a U-14 elite player with over developed quads, extremely tender hamstrings and poor gait. Her physical therapist and I are trying to find some research on this and then document our process. I've been doing a lot of work with players on ball striking and athletic development which is why they came to me, but I've never seen such poor mechanics and extreme injury at such a young age.
Are there any resources on this matter?"

I then posed the question to Dr. Don Kirkendall of FIFA F-MARC. He is also a regular presenter at the US Youth Soccer adidas Workshop. Here's his reply:

"I am not sure what injury they are asking about as 'tender hamstrings' doesn't tell me much. This could be part of the recovery process from a strain injury, delayed soreness from unaccustomed activity, or microtrauma from such processes as overstretch or weakness or the poor technique. Without a better description, I'd only be speculating.

An imbalance between quad and hamstring strength is an issue on a number of fronts. Most of the discussion is around injury which the Physical Therapist of this email would be aware of. But poor hamstring strength could also impair technique.

Some of it might be bound up in the male/female differences in kicking. Men approach the ball faster than women and then have a slower angular knee extension velocity than women. Thus women make up for the slow approach by extending the leg faster in an attempt to gain ball velocity. But this puts the knee at risk for extension injury. Could stronger hamstrings help? A good question. Hamstring strengthening has been advocated for reducing strain injury, especially at the highest levels of play in men, and been very successful.

On the strength-skill interaction, during ballistic movements, the hamstring muscles contract to prevent over/hyper extension of the knee. Weak hamstring muscles, which slow down terminal knee extension during kicking, could lead to a number of different sources of knee pain during kicking. So, the player would alter the kicking motion to compensate for the weak hamstring muscles and avoid the pain. She might try to approach faster and use less knee extension. Or she could be kicking mostly from the hip and not rapidly extending the knee. Or she could be doing everything else well right up until the point in the kicking cycle when it's time to extend the knee forcefully. Both would reduce the stress across the knee near forceful extension and avoid pain, but her ability at 'striking and playing the long ball' would be reduced. Try kicking hard with a straight leg.

Of course, there could be structural or other soft tissue issues at the knee that could be the source of pain and poor technique.

Here is a male/female comparison of kicking kinematics that Bill Barfield did that might be helpful. 
There may be references at the end they might find helpful."
 

Age of reckoning

Susan Boyd

Last week a Texas high school basketball player was busted for being 22 years old.  He was outed at a tournament where his former Florida high school coaches recognized him.  Ramifications of this discovery comprise his Texas team forfeiting all their games including the state championship and a renewed discussion on how we can insure that youth sports are played by youth.  Every couple of years a sports prodigy pops who challenges our ideas of what a youth player should be able to accomplish.  That challenge ultimately leads to endless forums questioning the player's age.  Once an overage player is discovered, everyone suffers from guilt by association.

Most of us remember the dust-up over Freddy Adu.  The soccer player from Ghana was just 14 years old when he was selected in the 2004 MLS draft by DC United.  Because he had immigrated to the United States at age 8 many sports writers questioned his actual birth date which is listed as June 2, 1989, making him just a week younger than my oldest son.  So the swirling arguments were not only fascinating but also relevant.  During many of Bryce's games we parents on the sidelines would comment on the "Adu situation."  Most of it was fueled by jealousy, but part of it was fueled by incredulity.  How could anyone be that good that young?  Issues which never came up in normal conversation were suddenly on the lips of most soccer parents:  bone length studies, DNA analysis, cranial evaluation.  In the end Freddy played in the MLS and on the 2008 U.S. Olympic team, was picked up by overseas clubs, and then essentially faded into the broad spectrum of American soccer players abroad.  His brightly burning star cooled to the same temperature as any of his peers because once the age issue was no longer significant the only aspect of his career that mattered was his talent which has dipped in comparison recently.  He didn't even make the U.S. roster for the World Cup team.  

Scandals involving Little League players show up regularly because the age limits for the World Series teams are extremely tight.  In 2001 a pitching phenomenon led his team to a third place finish in the World Series only to have that finish wiped from the record books when it was revealed that he was overage by just a few months.  Danny Altimonte, now 23 years old, had baseball success in high school helping his team win the state championship, and is working towards developing a coaching career.  His unfortunate miss of the age deadline really shouldn't eclipse his ability to pitch at 90 miles an hour while waiting for his voice to change.  But for the purposes of rules and an even playing field, those few months became the story.  Controversy over players both on foreign teams and foreign players on U.S. teams has plagued the Little League.  Inaccurate birth certificates, easily doctored records, and missing documentation all contribute to serious questions about player eligibility.  Of course, if a player is average, no one bothers with questions about age or eligibility.

When Robbie was in preschool his best friend was a boy two months his junior and over a foot taller.  While Robbie was in the lower fifth percentile on the growth chart, his friend was off the scale.  When they played sports together no one believed that this boy was actually the younger of the two.  Many people seriously questioned his age and therefore called into question his athletic ability as being only an offshoot of his "true" age.  It certainly made things awkward at soccer games where opposing team coaches and parents would loudly protest his participation.  The poor kid, who absolutely was the age he said he was, felt dishonest and unworthy.  His parents grew weary of defending their six year old from ugly verbal attacks.  He eventually switched to football, which was better suited for his frame and once he got to middle school he had several teammates bigger than he was, so no one challenged his age any longer.

Robbie faced a different age challenge because he was born on Dec. 27, making him young for his US Youth Soccer Olympic Development Program team.  He would often moan about not being born four days later so he could play on the next year up.  And he was right.  His very same skills would be more impressive against players six months younger than he was instead of six months older than he was.  But those were the rules.  The disparity in age got less and less significant as he grew older because the physical development of the boys evened out, and Robbie got more "looks" once he reached age 14.  On the other hand his teammate, Josh Lambo, was just a month older than Robbie and he joined FC Dallas when he was 17.  So birthdates aren't the only factor in a player's success or controversy.

The downside of players being overage exists more for the team than for the player.  Although the 22-year-old basketball player is under arrest for identity theft and other crimes related to his unfortunate choice, the real losers are his teammates who now will forfeit that all-important high school memory of a state championship.  The Little League pitcher has obviously gone on to forge his future in baseball, but his teammates will forever have the bitter taste of a significant accomplishment taken away.  Somewhere in this huge world of 6 billion people there are kids who develop early, possess talent beyond their years, and find their accomplishments called into question.  Right now the buzz in the soccer world is about a 9-year-old Brazilian and an 8-year-old Dutch boy who apparently have skills that beg the issue if they could really be that good and that young.  In 10 years they will either have risen to epic status or become just another good soccer player.  The real reckoning will depend on several factors:  talent, opportunity, drive, and development.  Amazingly those are the same factors that affect any young player, sensation or not.  While our children may not be awarded a million dollar Nike contract before getting their driver's licenses, they will be awarded the fun and memories of playing the sport they love and the chance to make something great out of their experience.  We'll even joke that once they hit the big time we'll get all those thousands of dollars invested in their play returned with interest.  Just one more thing, if your kids get there before mine do, toss a few crumbs my way.
 

Being a Good Coach

Sam Snow

Enjoy this insight from our former Women's National Team coach Greg Ryan on being a good coach.

Coaching players to develop to their full potential is more of an art than a science. Each aspect of player development must be addressed at the appropriate time and reinforced until it becomes second nature to the young player. The coach must allow the player the freedom to develop by learning from millions of experiences. The coach must resist the temptation to interrupt the players, realizing that learning takes place by experiencing the game.

Good coaches will create sessions in which the players are constantly playing the game whether it is 1
vs. 1 or up to 11vs. 11. The exercises will look and feel just like the real game. The players will love these coaches for giving them back the game and allowing them to express themselves on the field. They will develop players who "feel" the game, rather than players who only "think" the game.

Good coaches provide feedback throughout the session usually without stopping the flow of play. Sometimes, they are cheerleaders, just shouting…."great pass".   Sometimes, they have a quiet word in the flow of play to give a player an idea about how to solve a problem on the field. When they see a universal problem, they will stop the session, sort it out and restart as soon as possible.

A good coach does not try to solve every problem in each session. They understand that development whether individual or team is a long term process. They also understand that players can only assimilate a little information at a time, so they choose their comments carefully. In the end, it does not matter what the coach knows or says it only matters what the players can receive and implement.

The best chance a coach has to develop a player is to insure that they love the game. The best way to do this is to let them play the game.