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Coaches Blog

Sam's Blog is a bi-weekly addition to the US Youth Soccer Blog. Sam Snow is the Coaching Director for US Youth Soccer.

 

The Second Soccer Boom

Sam Snow

Our first soccer boom was earmarked by quantity. It was in fact explosive growth. So much so that to a significant extent the boom was uncontrolled. The first soccer boom brought soccer into the mainstream.
 
The second soccer boom has begun. It's not as loud or obvious as the first, but make no mistake that it is underway. This soccer boom is more controlled. Well perhaps it can be. But only if we decide now to control and direct it. The second soccer boom will be driven more by professionals and less by volunteers. This is not to say that volunteers are no longer a part of the team. Volunteers have been, are and will always be vitally important to the fabric of our game. Yet today's soccer boom is driven by professional administrators, professional coaches and professional referees. These professionals work today in many levels of the game. The numbers who earned qualifications and make a living in the game will increase as American soccer continues to evolve. Know though that the supporting hand for the professionals will be the volunteers. We are a team after all!
 
If quantity is the legacy of the first soccer boom then what do we hope will be the legacy of the second? For what will current soccer leaders be known? Quality!
 
We have the numbers. What shall we do with them? We have numbers of players, of fields, of team managers and of coaches. We even have good numbers of referees, supportive media and giving businesses; although we never have quite enough in these realms. We now have the infrastructure and means. So we must now act quickly, decisively and clearly to chart our future. The core tenant of our policies guiding us into the future shall be quality.
 
Quality in our decision making.
Quality in our programs.
Quality in our products.
Quality in our services.
Quality in our leadership.
 
Because of the World Wide Web a vast amount of soccer information is within easy reach of anyone in the world. No longer is the dissemination of soccer information largely controlled by centralized organizations such as FIFA, U.S. Soccer or US Youth Soccer. So what will distinguish us from so many other soccer resources? Quality and research. This educationally sound and research based approach must permeate not only our products, but also our policies, procedures and indeed our foundation for decision making.
 
We separate ourselves from the pack by our quality as well as by the humility and integrity for which we are already known. To further influence the American game we must share this vision and act jointly with our members. To accomplish such a lofty goal we must build our team.
 
Our team is the men and women of character among the state associations and clubs. Regardless of the role they play these individuals collectively allow us to design a bright future for generations of American soccer participants.
 
This future is embodied in the second American soccer boom. Our first American soccer boom occurred during the last thirty years of the 20th century. The foundation of that boom was built up by decades of soccer in ethnic enclaves and our universities and high schools. The catalyst for the boom was a small, but significant interest in professional soccer by a handful of investors and media. The flagship of the boom was the North American Soccer League. The energy source behind the boom? Moms and Dads! Volunteers who started soccer clubs, who built fields, who prodded authorities to support soccer programs in an ever-growing number of communities and schools. Without these parents the Beautiful Game in America would remain hidden in those ethnic neighborhoods and a campus here and there. Thanks to those volunteers we now have millions playing the game in almost every community of our nation.
 
What will be our legacy?
 

Priceless

Susan Boyd

I have a graduate degree in creative writing, specifically a double degree in poetry and playwriting.  This degree equipped me to teach other students and to write poetry and plays, none of which pays much.  I began graduate school in computer science, right at the start of Microsoft and Silicon Valley.  Had I completed my degree in computer science I would not be 1) writing this blog and 2) refinancing my house to pay for my kids’ college.   I tell you this not because I want to elicit your sympathies but to illustrate that we don’t always make our choices based on the most reasonable options.  I ended up choosing writing because I love it, even though I knew it wouldn’t pay.

The same can be said for our kids choosing select soccer.  All the time I hear parents talking about their child succeeding at soccer to the point that they will get a college scholarship.  If that’s anyone’s motivation for playing soccer, then I suggest you do a quick cost/benefit analysis.  For the very few who will be lucky enough to acquire a full or nearly full scholarship to college there are 1000 players who will get a small partial scholarship and another 4000 who won’t get anything. 

Soccer is classified as an “equivalency” sport meaning that coaches can divide their scholarships among all the players on the squad.  While that is good news in the fact that most players on a soccer team can earn a scholarship, the bad news is that it will probably be about 30% of the total cost of college.  Coaches will work to develop a scholarship package that includes academic as well as athletic money, but in the end few players get a full ride.  Right now coaches have 9.9 full scholarships to work with for men’s soccer and 12 for women’s soccer.  With the squads reaching 30 – 32 players you can quickly do the math, which is exactly what I decided to do. 

Parents on the sideline often joke with one another that if they had put all the money they spent on soccer into the bank instead, they would have paid for college easily.  I wondered if that were true.  Here goes what I discovered for one son.

The club soccer fees for 13 years were approximately $9,000.  It would have been higher but one year he played on an ethnic team and the fees were only $150.  We traveled to at minimum five tournaments a year from U11 up for an average cost of $500 a weekend (if the family came along it would double) for a total of $20,000 - $35,000.  Soccer uniforms and gear averaged around $300 a year for a total of $3900.  Indoor soccer added $250 a year for a total of $2,000.  I had no idea what to include for gas and wear and tear on the car, but I thought a total of $1700 would be fair.   The grand total:  $36,600 to $51,600 and that isn’t even factoring in ODP and Super Y League costs (my brain is already exploding).   If I invested that money in a modest CD I could probably have saved up at minimum $43,000 to $60,000.  That would have covered a state school very nicely and most private schools for a year or two.  So while not exactly paying for college, I can attest that it’s more than my son presently has in scholarship!

I’m not advocating removing your child from youth soccer.  Far from it . . . my point is that playing any sport or participating in any extra-curricular activity that can be translated into a college scholarship shouldn’t be based on the goal of earning a scholarship.  It should be based on the enjoyment and immediate benefits the activity provides.  For our family it meant lots of weekends together in all kinds of weather sharing a common interest.  It also meant the chance to visit cities we might never have considered as vacation spots and making wonderful discoveries.

Playing soccer has provided us with good friendships, fond memories, the joy of success, and the humility of defeat.  You can’t put a dollar amount on those benefits – as the ad says they are priceless. 

When Bryce was awarded a scholarship for soccer, it was definitely one of his proudest moments, but the amount of the scholarship didn’t define his pride.  Being recruited and wanted by a college soccer team was reward enough.  Keeping that in perspective helps me when I have to write that check for tuition and room and board.  He plays soccer because it is his passion, and that’s reason enough to keep playing.

 

Travel and Representing

Sam Snow

My work requires a good bit of travel throughout the USA.  My family and friends comment that it’s a great way to see the country.  Well it has been a chance to see airports, hotels and the soccer fields that now dot the countryside.  I do occasionally get to sightsee a little and there is so much our country has to offer.

I must say though that what the travel affords me is the opportunity to meet the wonderful people involved in the beautiful game.  Keep in mind that those people are not just the ones on those soccer fields I mentioned. 

Often they are fellow travelers, airline crew, hotel and restaurant workers or even the taxi driver.  I’ve gotten into conversations with flight attendants who are volunteer coaches or administrators or the parents of players in US Youth Soccer Olympic Development Program (US Youth Soccer ODP) or TOPSoccer.  I’m impressed by how many Americans now have some connection to soccer.  So here’s my final thought of this little meandering of mine. 

Those of us who represent the game as professional coaches, administrators or referees must carry ourselves well.  If you are being paid any amount of money to referee, coach or administer soccer then you are a professional in our sport.  Those of us in that boat must be cognizant that we are always being judged when in public.  We represent American youth soccer and our appearance, demeanor, words and actions reflects upon the sport and all of us in that boat with you.  Let us then strive to set and met high standards for ourselves.

 

 

Workshop presenters and events

Sam Snow

This week I'd like to give you some insights to many of the first rate presenters who will be available to you at the 2008 US Youth Soccer adidas Workshop in Pittsburgh. For our coaches, referees and administrators there'll be sessions that may educate and inspire. We'll have sessions for the technical development of mainstream players, select players and disabled players. 

The presenters include our newest hire in the US Youth Soccer Technical Department John Ellinger, as well as from Dr. John Thomas and me. Alongside of us in the coaching tracks are John Hackworth, U.S. Soccer Academy Director and Assistant Men's National Team Coach; Jeff Tipping, the NSCAA Director of Coaching; Detlev Brüggemann, FIFA Instructor; Brett Thompson, Director of Coaching for Ohio South Youth Soccer Association and US Youth Soccer Region II Olympic Development Program Head Coach for girls; Dr. Don Kirkendall from the University of North Carolina and FIFA's FMARC; Karla Thompson, Director of Soccer Operations for the Arizona Fury and former U20 Women's National Team player; Brian Bliss, Director of Coaching for the Kansas State Youth Soccer Association and former Men's National Team and MLS player; Paul Halford, Director of Coaching for PA West, plus many more outstanding American coaches.

For our colleagues in officiating and administration some of the top class clinicians are Larry Monaco, President of US Youth Soccer; Rodney Kenney; Herb Silva; John Kukitz, Chair of the Soccer Start Committee; Todd Roby, US Youth Soccer Senior Manager of Communications; Dr. Aimee Kimball; Dr. David Carr among many others.

With help from many of the PA West soccer clubs we'll have on hand (foot?) some wonderful young players to assist the coaches in showing you the best in the craft of coaching. Plus for the first time there will be a Kick Zone for local players to come and try out their skills.

Did I mention the Awards Gala with the presentations of the Dr. Thomas Fleck Award, Coach of the Year honors and more? There will be exhibits, meetings, sharing of information and experiences along with new and old friendships. Join us for a fabulous time with those who support and guide youth soccer in our country.
 
 
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