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Parents Blog

Susan Boyd blogs on USYouthSoccer.org every Monday.  A dedicated mother and wife, Susan offers a truly unique perspective into the world of a "Soccer Mom". 

 

All eyes turn to South Africa

Susan Boyd

Whether or not you love soccer you can't avoid it for the next four weeks. It has taken over the airwaves, the sports news, the evening news, the ticker tapes under programs, and advertising. World Cup fever has infected our house completely. There are no other TV channels available except ESPN and ABC. Four weeks of "GOOOOOOOOOOOOOAL" and heartache. Four weeks of second guessing and hoping. Four weeks of supreme misery and supreme joy. If you love soccer, you've got to love the World Cup which trumps any soap opera with more intensity and intrigue than a crime drama, more entertainment than any comedy, and more international exposure than any history lesson. Usually summer soccer limits itself to camps and tournaments, but every four years there's a larger stage for this sport that has captivated the world and is slowly winning over America one family at a time.

I remember watching my first soccer game in 1965. I don't remember their opponent, but I do remember the Italian National team. Why? Because the players crumpled to the grass on every real or imagined touch to their bodies and writhed in agony until an official suggested they should get up. Miraculously they recovered and often went on to achieve some spectacular steal or score. I thought they were incredible babies. My opinion has changed over time and experience. I still think Italians dissolve more easily than other nations, but I now understand the philosophy and the reasoning behind those breakdowns. In 34 years of watching soccer I've grown quite a bit in my understanding of the game, but I still learn something new every time I see a contest.

This will be my 11th World Cup, although it will be the first in which I have the opportunity to easily see all the games. Thank goodness the US sponsored the World Cup in 1994 which ushered in the deep TV coverage in America that most of us depend upon for our World Cup experience. This year the World Cup coverage is deeper than ever with TV, HD, mobile phone, and internet coverage. No matter where I am, I'll be able to tune into the World Cup and with my DVR and ESPN3.com, even if I absolutely can't tune in at that moment, I'll still be able to see the complete game and hear it announced in several languages should I decide to practice my fading German and French. I have push notifications coming to my cell phone to report half time and final scores as well as injury reports, cards, and substitutions. 

As part of the anticipation leading up to the World Cup, South Africa sponsored a music festival in Johannesburg. Although most of the audience clearly called South Africa home, there were flags from all over the world waving during the performances. The show brought out some emotional feelings as the camera panned the multi-racial crowd enjoying the same music, the same night air, and the same experiences without borders or animosity. This international spirit of cooperation embedded in international competition always brings a lump to my throat. I'm a sucker for the Olympics, Summer and Winter, and I truly love the World Cup. Within the confines of international rules governing these games, nations can compete, win or lose, and shake hands at the end to go on to another contest or go home. There are individual bad behaviors which mar the overall civilized nature of the month's games, but thankfully those are few and quickly dealt with.

I'll probably write a few more blogs about the World Cup, so forgive me this indulgence. But I can't emphasize enough the significance of this event. Soccer has many large stages, but none so large as the World Cup. As a soccer fan and a soccer mom, I have to celebrate these four weeks. But especially as a mom I'm thankful for an experience we share as a family. I love the hours of white knuckles, agony, and unfettered joy that a delicious World Cup game offers to young and old. It's better than a 3D movie, which by the way is probably how you'll watch the World Cup next time around on your personal mobile TV. Believe me . . . this World Cup has just begun and I can't wait until 2014 in Brazil.
 

Stealthy Healthy

Susan Boyd

Last week I had my annual doctor's appointment which means I actually saw her 18 months ago. You know how that goes. Good intentions don't always translate into action. Because I had some vitamin D deficiency and some low potassium, it got me thinking again about the snacks I provide before and after games to help boost the various electrolytes and vitamin levels that can deplete with heavy activity and loss of fluids. While there are sport drinks which concentrate on three electrolytes levels and carbohydrates through sugars, they don't cover everything. Young players, to perform at top health and ability, need regular vitamins, fiber, and calcium in addition to common electrolytes and carbohydrates. No drink can give them all they need, so adding some healthy before and after game snacks makes sense.

We all hear about potassium and the important role it plays in helping muscles to fire. The stand-by for potassium has been bananas, which are a good source of potassium, but not the best. In fact on the scale of the best foods which give a potassium boost, bananas hold the bottom place. What they do offer is potassium without sodium, a huge bonus since several potassium-rich foods also contain a fair amount of sodium. A better alternative would be a snack box of raisins which provide 1020 mg of potassium as compared to 400 mg from a banana, and they only have 60 mg of sodium. Sultanas have even less sodium, 20 mg, and 1050 mg of potassium, but they are usually more difficult to find and not as appealing to young players. If your children like fresh apricots, then that's the ultimate potassium provider with 1380 mg of potassium and only 15 mg of sodium. They need to eat four apricots to get those benefits, so they had better love them!

Children need energy from carbohydrates, but like everything in life, there are good and bad varieties. You'll want carbs that aren't easily digested. These will usually come from foods high in fiber content and not processed.   For example, fresh oranges have half the sugar and twice the fiber of orange juice. As a rule of thumb for fruits and vegetables those with vibrant colors indicate more nutritional benefits. Additionally, since vegetables are usually a hard sell, I found that color did encourage my children to at least try a taste so I opted for red, yellow, and orange peppers rather than the standby green ones.   They usually cost more, but if the children eat them, the expense is worth it.  If you go green then the darker and richer the green, the more vitamins and nutrients contained within. One great source of carbohydrates on the way to or from a game is graham crackers. You need to be sure that these are made with graham and whole wheat rather than refined bleached flour. Usually the whole wheat flour has been fortified with vitamin B 1 and B 2, another nutritional plus. They also come in a low-fat option that does have a bit more sugar for taste. 

Granola bars can be a source of both carbohydrates and fiber, but be careful of the refined sugar content. Even though a chocolate covering can make a bar palatable for children used to sugary cereals and drinks, it negates the benefits the bars provide. Reading labels, now that the government requires significant detail in the explanations, can insure you get the healthiest option. If you use granola bars as a team snack, be sure you check for nut allergies since many bars either contain nuts or are manufactured in a factory that has nuts on the premises. When you find a good bar, you can't beat the convenience of throwing a few in a purse or backpack to curb a child's hunger after a game.

Calcium often goes hand in hand with fat, so you need to find sources that have a low fat option. Milk is high in calories, so it's not the best source for calcium. In fact all the dairy family of products offer good sources of calcium, but need to be consumed in moderation. I grew up in a household that drank whole milk like water, not very heart-healthy. To this day, the best I can do is 2% milk because I grew up with a beverage that didn't let light through the glass. I have opted for calcium enriched orange juice, which has natural sugars, but no fat. Other sources of calcium are leafy vegetables, again a hard sell for children, but some will eat broccoli. We called it "tree" and even today the children still call it that. For convenience you can turn to the low-fat yogurts in a tube, but again read the label carefully to avoid those yogurts high in sugar and fat. The advantage of the tubes is that they can be frozen and become a healthy alternative to ice cream bars. They also make a wonderful team snack.

There's a great resource on the internet provided by Harvard School of Public Health that details not only high-quality nutrition options, but also has recipes and links to other information (http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/). Another resource is Everyday Health (http://www.everydayhealth.com/) which has a wonderful and clear guide to the nutritional and caloric contents of many fresh and packaged foods. Additional manufacturers provide the nutritional information for their products on their websites which you can locate through a search. That way you can compare labels in the comfort of your easy chair before heading out to the grocery. Ultimately no source can supplement the information you glean from your personal physician who knows your family's health and what will benefit it best. So be sure to check with him or her if you have any concerns or questions.

We can provide healthy snacks before and after games that supply the necessary nutrients a young athlete needs. Sports drinks can replenish some of those elements, but not all. Children need to have the broad spectrum of vitamins, minerals, electrolytes, carbohydrates, proteins, and even fats to operate their bodies at optimal levels. As parents, we can pack a pretty good pre- and post-game variety of foods that meet the requirements of good health and good taste. 
             
 
 

Specialize in One Sport?

Sam Snow

The executive director for US Youth Soccer, Jim Cosgrove, was interviewed for an article for the May issue of SportsEvents Magazine on the issue of kids specializing in one sport -- and sometimes a single position – at a very young age (8-13). I think you'll be interested in the questions and comments.
 
1. Are you seeing a lot of kids specializing in one sport at an early age? If so, has this been increasing, decreasing or stayed about the same over the past few years?
JC: Yes there are children being asked to specialize in one sport and even one position early in their careers. My educated estimation is that the number of kids specializing early has increased over the last five years as participation in youth sports has increased over that time.
 
2. If you are seeing this trend, why do you think it is happening?
JC: The trend occurs because parents and/or coaches believe it will accelerate the youngster's development. They use examples from individual sports such as golf or gymnastics where early specialization can be appropriate and they apply that model to team sports. All team sports are classified as long-term development sports, so children should not specialize in only one sport until perhaps the late teenage years.
 
3. What do you consider to be the pros and cons of early specialization in sports?
JC: I cannot think of any pros to early specialization. The cons include poor athletic development, over-use injuries, emotional exhaustion and psychosocial burn-out. The too much-too soon syndrome also causes a jaded attitude toward the sport to develop by the mid to late teens.
 
4. At what age is specialization a good thing?
JC: Sports specialize too early in an attempt to attract and retain participants. 17-years-old and beyond is appropriate for specialization in a single sport. For soccer, position versatility is still important even at this age and especially for field players.
 
5. Can you provide some common sense recommendations to parents (and kids) who may believe that by focusing on one sport at a young age they will get college scholarships or become professional athletes?
JC: Approximately 2% of youth soccer players will earn a college scholarship to play soccer. Let your child play soccer to his or her content without an expectation for the big payoff of an athletic scholarship – there's much more money available for academic scholarships than athletic ones.
 
In conclusion, sports can be classified as either early or late specialization. Early specialization sports include artistic and acrobatic sports such as gymnastics, diving, and figure skating. These differ from late specialization sports in that very complex skills are learned before maturation since they cannot be fully mastered if taught after maturation.

Most other sports are late specialization sports. However, all sports should be individually analyzed using international and national normative data to decide whether they are early or late specialization.  If physical literacy is acquired before maturation, athletes can select a late specialization sport when they are between the ages of 12 and 15 and have the potential to rise to international stardom in that sport.

Specializing before the age of 10 in late specialization sports contributes to:
• One-sided, sport-specific preparation
• Lack of ABC's, the basic movement and sports skills
• Overuse injuries
• Early burnout
• Early retirement from training and competition

For late specialization sports, specialization before age 10 is not recommended since it contributes to early burnout, dropout and retirement from training and competition (Harsanyi, 1985).
 

Ke Nako

Susan Boyd

Sports often become the allegory for other events. Father's Day has families replaying Field of Dreams where baseball provides the connection between a resentful adult son and his deceased father. Football is the backdrop for improving racial relations in Remember the Titans. Even soccer has been the means for a daughter to earn her father's respect in Gracie or break loose from traditions while still honoring her roots in Bend it Like Beckham. But this year South Africa invites the world to its home to show its political, economic, and social renovations. South Africa won its bid for the World Cup in 2004 just 10 years after officially abolishing apartheid. The World Cup has become not only an allegory for what the world can achieve but for how people previously oppressed both politically and economically can triumph. No matter if South Africa wins their first match against Mexico on June 11, as a nation they will have the pride of showcasing their independence and growth.

But their first opportunity came in 1995, one year after apartheid was entirely abolished and just months into Nelson Mandela's first year as president of South Africa. That year South Africa hosted the Rugby World Cup. Their team, the Springboks, was all-white with one lone black player, Chester Williams. Mandela, however, saw the team as a significant binding symbol for his country in turmoil. The slogan "One Team, One Country" epitomized Mandela's vision for what a sport could achieve. He met opposition from both blacks and whites for his support of the "Boks," but he recognized that if they could win the World Cup the victory could be a moment of pride to be shared by everyone in the country. The movie Invictus and the ESPN documentary The 16th Man chronicle these watershed moments for a country teetering on the brink of either social collapse or political unity. When Mandela, a former black political prisoner, handed the World Cup trophy to captain Francois Pienaar, a white member of the former ruling class, it was against the background of a united nation of sports fans both black and white who for that moment felt the kinship of a shared victory. You couldn't write a better Hollywood script.

Most youth players were born after the abolishment of apartheid and long after the Civil Rights Act in the U.S. But it's important to recognize that not too many years ago many of the sports images we take for granted couldn't and didn't exist. Sports have always been a means to highlight and overcome injustices. Jesse Owens made mincemeat of Hitler's Aryan hopes in the 1936 Olympics with grace and humility, proving that no one race has the monopoly on talent and class. Integrated sports teams are now not only accepted but expected. Even golf, which is often played on private golf courses with strict membership policies, has evolved.   Part of getting golf included in the Olympics is whether or not it is played at all levels "without discrimination with a spirit of friendship, solidarity and fair play."

Sports have also been used as one tool to put pressure on discriminatory practices. In South Africa athletes faced ostracism from major world events including the Olympics, rugby friendlies, and soccer competitions because of their country's policy of apartheid. Add to that economic trade embargos, including the British actors' union refusing to allow the sale of British T.V. programs to South Africa. In 1992 most of these bans were lifted as the apartheid policies were slowly repealed. So bringing the World Cup to Africa for the first time and giving South Africa the stage for this event has greater significance than any other World Cup. A stable shift of power happened in 1994 and a continued growth to equality and integration has established South Africa as an example of how the end of oppression doesn't need to lead to instability and continued violence. 

Did the Rugby World Cup set the foundation for a smooth transition of power? That's probably giving one sporting event too much credit. But it certainly was one of the defining moments in South Africa coming together as "A Rainbow Nation" as Mandela called it. My sons are African American, and we had hoped to afford a trip to South Africa for this World Cup not only because we love soccer but because for the boys' heritage this is a watershed moment. But we will have to content ourselves with watching on TV with all the other millions of soccer fans. While we watch hopefully we will not forget the historical canvas on which this sporting event plays out. There will always be distrust, hatred, prejudice, and domination from one group towards another. It's human nature. But remembering that 20 years ago the relatives of the black players on South Africa's soccer team couldn't vote, had to live in areas specifically designated for how they were defined racially, couldn't go to university with whites, couldn't set foot in whites only beaches, restaurants, and stores, couldn't travel outside of their designated areas without government permission, and for most wouldn't have been allowed to play for the national team indicates how significant this change is for the country, the continent and the world. The official slogan of this World Cup is "Ke Nako (It's Time). Celebrate Africa's Humanity." I'm ready.