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Coaches Blog

Sam's Blog is a bi-weekly addition to the US Youth Soccer Blog. Sam Snow is the Coaching Director for US Youth Soccer.

 

Giving Coaches the Best Coaching Materials

Sam Snow

One aspect that separates US Youth Soccer from other soccer organizations is the research based information we use in our education of coaches, administrators and parents. This is reflected in the National Youth License curriculum, the content of The Novice Coach DVD Series, the new Skills School DVD and Technical Manual, as well as, the online postings on USYouthSoccer.org.

At the annual US Youth Soccer adidas Workshop and Awards Gala, the presenters are often leaders in their field. We try to expose our members to the latest and sometimes quite innovative methods in our soccer world. One of those presentations, two years ago in St. Louis, was made by Angel Planells. Coach Planells holds a Master's Degree in Nutrition as well as being an active youth coach in Manhattan. With the help of US Youth Soccer, he completed a survey of hundreds of youth soccer players, parents of players and coaches on their sport nutrition habits. Angel then made a presentation on his findings at the 2007 Workshop. A copy of his research paper was distributed to state and club coaches across the country.

In the same vein, recent research was done by Kristen Jones on the stresses involved in coaching. Much of the research was based on a through survey done with US Youth Soccer coaches across the nation. The complete dissertation was sent to the coaches who have singed into the US Youth Soccer Coaches database, on USYouthSoccer.org. These coaches are our first point of contact when research projects such as the two mentioned are undertaken. They too are the first members of US Youth Soccer to receive copies of the completed papers. If you have not entered yourself into the database and would like to do so, here are the details and link to sign up.

We are looking to build a national directory of US Youth Soccer club coaches. 

GOAL: build accurate contacts at the coach level to further the communication of programs, benefits and educational opportunities offered by US Youth Soccer to those who impact the game daily.

The purpose of the national coaching database is to further the communication efforts of US Youth Soccer to those who impact and influence youth soccer on a daily basis, specifically at the grassroots level.  This database would receive coaching information as deemed necessary and have the option of receiving US Youth Soccer's Kwik Kicks eNewsletter to further the efforts of the organization's membership benefits.

The US Youth Soccer National Coaching Database is live, to submit your information please click the link below.

/coaches/NationalCoachDatabaseForm/

This information is not intended to be sold to any third party.  The privacy policy can be found in its entirety by clicking the link below. 

US Youth Soccer Privacy Policy:

Please pass this message along to coaches in the soccer clubs in your area.  Thank you for your contribution in our effort to improve our communication and service to America's youth soccer coaches.
 

Dereliction of Duty

Susan Boyd

This spring thaw reveals all my sins of omission from the previous autumn. Now that the deck has shrugged off its winter mantle, the leaves and sticks I never quite got swept up before the first snow fall lie in matted heaps grey and rotting. This pretty much describes my entire environment –grey deck, grey piles of debris, grey skies, grey lawn, grey windows, grey streets, grey attitude. My deck taunts me with its reminder of all the projects I have left undone using winter as an excuse. Or perhaps I should say seven or eight winters as an excuse. My home is so bad that even aluminum siding sales people don't bother with me. 

So this week I began to do something about it. It took me over five years to remove all the pea-green wallpaper off the hallway and stairwell walls (not to mention the ten years it took me to get motivated to begin peeling it off) and another two years before I finally picked the colors and border I wanted as replacements. Next week a painter will come in and bring my vision to life after only fifteen years of gestation. A landscaper will bring order to the flower beds I have tried, in vain, to turn into an English cottage garden, managing up to this point merely cottage cheese.

Winter is a good excuse, especially in Wisconsin, but my real excuse for this procrastination is soccer. Over the past thirteen years I can count on one hand the number of full weekends I have had totally free of soccer, and I can count on my hands and feet the number of weekends where I had just one of the days free of soccer. Whenever I drive into a new town and travel down the boulevards and lanes of that borough, I can quickly spot the homes where families with kids in sports dwell. The good intentions are evident, but the follow through doesn't exist.

These houses have a rake lying mid-stroke on the lawn, half of their shutters painted, and plants in their plastic containers lined up alongside a garden bed. I don't think I have actually planted geraniums in over a decade. I just throw them into my window boxes in their plastic containers – otherwise there wouldn't be a spot of color in my entire yard. These otherwise handsome homes exhibit a barrenness of orderliness and polish. The fallen tree branches of last autumn join the fallen tree branches of spring to create a thatched barrier stretching from one end of the lawn to the other. I gather mine as needed to start fires in the outdoor fire pit – once I get that cleaned up and dried out. The derelict look of these homes belies the joy that exists inside.

While I look forward to my soccer "retirement" so I can actually spend my weekends doing what home dwellers should do, I also know it spells the end of a wonderful era. All those days sitting in rain, snow, sleet, and sun cheering on my kids, all those road trips, all those loads of laundry, all those abandoned cleats littering my garage, all those water bottles rolling around the back seat, all those smelly socks pushed up against the heating vents in the car, all those soccer balls escaping out of the back hatch and rolling half a mile away, all of those things will just be memories.   While I often wish my home looked like something out of Architectural Digest and less like a "before" photo, I realize that every neglected flower bed, every untrimmed edge, every unwashed window means some soccer memory completed. I go to bed at night with visions of Home and Garden TV dancing in my head and the fervent prayer that home improvement elves will visit me, which seems the only hope I'll ever get my projects completed. 

So add painters, landscapers, plumbers, carpenters and electricians to the hidden costs of having kids who play soccer. I got the estimate for my spring projects yesterday and realized that I need a second and third job. Maybe I'll paint other people's houses. In the meantime I am headed to Columbus, Ohio this weekend for my grandson Keaton's first soccer game and baseball practice. "Retirement" won't be happening soon.
 

TOPSoccer Coaching Course

Sam Snow

This past weekend I attended the US Youth Soccer Region IV TOPSoccer symposium. Over 80 people from around the region attend the event from administrators, coaches and referees involved with US Youth Soccer TOPSoccer. The presentations made included How to Start a Program, Hosting Your Initial Event, Safety and Risk Management, Roundtable on the Field Sessions, Coaching Tips, Training Activities, Integrating the Players and TOPSoccer parent. The main focus this weekend though was the new course, Coaching TOPSoccer. This is a new four hour coaching course that will be offered by the US Youth Soccer state associations. The course was delivered by Rick Flores and me.

This was the final pilot course after the first one being delivered in Pittsburgh at the 2008 US Youth Soccer adidas Workshop & Coaches Convention by Brett Thompson and Rick Flores. The course involves classroom and field sessions. The section topics in the course are Why Do People Play Soccer, Player Challenges, Qualities of Coaches, Prevention & Care of Injuries/Risk Management, as well as, Communication and Ideas for Coaching. The practical field session takes the course candidates through training activities that are suitable for players with Down syndrome, Autism, ADHD and Cerebral Palsy. Coaches who complete the course will earn a US Youth Soccer certificate issued by the state association.

The symposium attendees completed the course in the Saturday morning sessions. They were issued the inaugural certificates at the beginning of the afternoon session. We then went to the Starfire indoor fields where TOPSoccer players from the local TUSK soccer club joined us. Rick Flores took the kids through a very good one hour session. He used the symposium attendees as the soccer buddies to assist the players as necessary in the training activities and the match. This 'hands on' opportunity was a great learning experience for many of the coaches and administrators. After training we all joined the players for a pizza party.

The following day of the symposium we attended four classroom presentations before our departure. The symposium was quite well done with a range of topics for parents, coaches and administrators. The next TOPSoccer symposium will be hosted by the Ohio South Youth Soccer Association and US Youth Soccer Region II in Cincinnati on August 1st to the 2nd. Plans are underway for similar symposia in US Youth Soccer Regions I and III.

The US Youth Soccer TOPSoccer program has room for dramatic growth. According to the U.S. Census Bureau 51 million Americans have some sort of disability. Four million of those citizens are children age four to sixteen. Our clubs and state associations have just begun to bring soccer to this segment of our population. As these youngsters are afforded the chance to play the world's game we will 'walk the talk' as The Game for ALL Kids!
 

Who can you really look to for advice?

Susan Boyd

My husband told me yesterday that Sally Fields is going to address the Scientific Assembly of the American Academy of Family Physicians this coming September. Her topic will be osteoporosis. My husband was second author on a three year cognitive psychology study of infant and toddler development. He and the primary author submitted their paper on their findings which weren't monumental but definitely questioned some of the leading authorities on how children develop their cognitive skills such as speech. The idea was to create a kit that pediatricians and family doctors could use to administer tests to better assess a child's developmental growth. Their paper was rejected – twice. But now Sally Fields of "you like me . . . you really, really like me!" fame and star of those Boniva bone strengthening pill commercials apparently has gained enough expertise on osteoporosis and its prevention to be able to address a Scientific Assembly on the topic.
           
Who do we trust to guide us through our tangled lives? Rather than go through months, even years of detailed psychological counseling we look to Dr. Phil or Dr. Laura to give us a sound-bite band-aids.   CNN's chief medical correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, is a neurosurgeon and NBC's medical correspondent, Dr. Nancy Snyderman, is an otolaryngologist, yet they give advice on the entire spectrum of medical issues. This would be like going to an OB-GYN to have your prostate checked! The influx of media supported "experts" receives instant validation just because they are on the TV or the radio. Even Lynn Spears, the mother of Britney and Jamie, wrote a parenting book which blessedly has been put in hibernation by the publisher.   But I really felt we achieved a new low with an actor giving a medical speech. ""I'm not a doctor, but I play one at medical conventions.""
           
The same concerns come with sports and who we can trust to give us good advice about our kids. What about the parents who are told by coaches that their nine year old child has the ability to make the national team, so they should hand him or her over to a particular club for training? Who can give them an honest assessment? If a player is good, every coach will attest that his or her club offers the best chance for development. How can parents tell if the assessment is sincere or is made because the team is missing a defender for next year and as soon as a stronger defender shows up, their child will be unceremoniously dumped? It happens every year to thousands of players across the country. Not exactly the type of self-esteem boost families seek for their children.  
           
How do parents know which position their child should play? A coach needing a goal keeper will seek out and convince the most likely candidate on the team even if the player has great potential as a field player. On Robbie's club team half the players are former midfielders and still play midfield on their high school teams. But with a surplus of excellent players who also happen to be midfielders, they got shuttled around to other positions. Robbie never played forward until he got to his present club team where he got told he was a great forward. Now college coaches are talking about him as a midfielder. Who knows? I certainly don't have the expertise to figure it out, and if you ask Robbie, he says he'd rather play midfield.
           
Clubs have turned to a fairly rigorous training schedule. Who can really offer the best expertise on a training regimen and how it affects various age levels? Fitness, team tactics, skills, nutrition, and quantity, regularity and intensity of sessions share importance. What's the best mix? Add to this the on-going argument about specialization vs. playing a wide range of sports. The former is blamed for repetition injuries and body stresses while the latter is blamed for players becoming jacks of all trades and masters of none. When is the right time to shift to a concentration on one or two sports? Experts disagree and lay people manage to weigh in with even more opinions. Ask a coach and an orthopedist what the best training regimen is and you'll get some differing opinions. Then ask a sports trainer who'll confuse the issue even further. Finally ask a child psychologist and hear another approach. Each one has important authority on the topic, but each one also has a differing point of view based on what each sees as the benefits and the detriments of particular choices.

I'm facing a quandary right now without an expert in sight. Robbie is receiving emails, letters, and brochures about dozens of college camps across the country. Every letter touts how players are selected from the camps to be on D1 college teams and coaches exert anywhere from moderate to strong pressure to attend their camps. These cost $450 to $650 not including transportation to and from the events. There is also the veiled message that should you forgo a camp you are risking not being recruited for that school. What's a parent to do? First off the letters are sent to a significant group of players because the schools need to fill the camps to make them financially viable. Therefore you can't assume because you got a letter that you are one of the top picks for that school. You can definitely assume that the coaches either saw you play somewhere or heard of you from someone credible or you were on a list such as Olympic Development Program state team or on a competitive team or your name was on a mailing list they purchased. Elite camps for most schools are listed right on their athletic websites, so even if you didn't get an invite, you can still sign up. That takes some of the bloom off the rose. But I have to admit to feeling the same pressure to figure out which camps if any Robbie should attend. And the only experts are the same college coaches who are soliciting his attendance.
           
What I have finally decided in all this mess is to depend upon my own children to let me know what's best. Kids usually have a better finger on the pulse of their coach's intentions or their team's dynamics, so I trust them to figure out where they want to be and why. If they want to play three or four sports, so long as they aren't sacrificing one team's schedule and cohesiveness to serve another team's needs – in other words he or she is meeting all team commitments – then let the kids decide when they want to or if they want to specialize. The rule in our house was only one sport per season, but that was a mom rule because of scheduling and car-pooling. If a child is grunting when sitting down, he or she is either seventy years old or is training too hard or incorrectly. No child should need an ice bag every night and be popping ibuprofen regularly. Robbie picked his camps on the basis of location, school, and how much they would eat into his summer fun time. If he misses a camp that costs him recruitment, then so be it. There was no perfect answer anyway. 
           
However, if you really need some answers, I suggest writing to Jonathan Rhys-Meyers. He played the coach in "Bend it Like Beckham." If Sally Fields can lecture on osteoporosis on the basis of acting in Boniva commercials, then it logically follows that Jonathan seems the right resource for questions on soccer development. After all he was actually in the movie – Beckham was played by a stand-in so what would Beckham know?