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Coaches Blog

Sam's Blog is a bi-weekly addition to the US Youth Soccer Blog. Sam Snow is the Coaching Director for US Youth Soccer.


Soccer is Like School

Sam Snow

When I make a presentation to a club or in discussion with coaches at a coaching school, I often make the connection that a young soccer player’s growth in the game is VERY similar to their growth as a student. The timeline to high quality performance is about the same, in their twenties. The variety of types of learners (players) and teachers (coaches) is about the same and the need for clear communication with parents is the same.

I’ve found that the academic analogy works well with most adults. They know that their second grader isn’t ready for Geometry; other mathematics must be learned first. Pick any subject and there is a foundation that must be learned before going on to advanced study. Grammar school children are not ready for college academics. Those same children are not ready to play the adult version of soccer. Both academic and athletic development take decades to achieve.

Club leaders must work on club management through a dedicated player development model. The analogy would be to speak of the many years of schooling, with continuous "training", starting with the basic building blocks prior to a kid being ready to enter the job market and compete for jobs.

The business connection of a school and a youth soccer club reflect one another as well. Both are not for profit organizations. Yet they must have a sound business plan to keep the doors open in order to achieve their mission. The mission of the school is the academic development of the student. The mission of the club is the soccer development of the player. Remember, we’re talking about the same kid here. For most of the day that kid is a student in school and later in the same day he or she is a player in the club. But who’s the customer and who’s the consumer is different in both settings.

At the school and the club the parents are the customer in that they pay the costs involved. The consumer is the student at school – academic matriculation. The consumer at the club is the player – soccer matriculation. In the youth soccer club setting there is clearly a difference between the customer and the consumer.

It’s roughly twenty years to end up with a college or post-graduate degree and the time line is the same for the majority of players to high level soccer performance.

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Get Organized

Susan Boyd

Every spring, I reevaluate my organizational needs for soccer. Manufacturers recognize how important tidiness is for active families juggling kids with lots of activities. I’m always amazed and pleased to see what new products come available that can smooth out the chaos of getting ready for soccer and traveling to practices, games, and tournaments. Helping me out is the latest issue of Real Simple magazine, which is devoted entirely to organization. I discovered several great ideas that should help everyone out and then sprinkled in a few of the hints I’ve found that work for me or for my friends.            

The best hint I got from Real Simple was a mom who used EnviroSax to keep her kids organized. You can certainly use any sack you want, but I personally own a dozen of these huge “sacs” that I have used for three years to carry groceries, clothing and firewood, along with scores of other usages and all I need to do is throw the bags in the washer and they come out good as new. This mom provides each of her children a bag for each of their activities. She attaches a luggage tag to the bag with the child’s name on one side with the activity (i.e. Billy - soccer) and on the other side she lists all the items necessary to participate in the activity (i.e. cleats, jersey, shorts, socks, shin guards etc.) That way she can look quickly at the list and the items in the bag, replenishing what needs to be added. It also makes it easy for babysitters, grandparents and neighbors to help out without her having to print out instructions. The idea is so simple I’m surprised I didn’t come across it sooner. But I think it’s a brilliant way to keep things all orderly and complete. EnviroSax sell for around $8 for one sack or $35 for five sacks. There’s even a Sesame Street set. They come in a small carry bag and roll up to just a tiny percentage of their full size. Luggage tags can be found on with thousands of options in just about any price range.           

A second wonderful suggestion from a mom is a product called Cocoon Grid It. This comes in a variety of sizes and is essentially a flat board covered in heavy-duty nylon. On one side there are dozens of interwoven elastic straps, which will hold all those items in your purse, backpack or soccer bag that fall down to the bottom and get lost. You can put things in it like charging cords for your phone, the phone, Chap Stick, headphones, pens, pencils, extra keys, shoelaces, sunscreen, any little things you carry with you. Once you get the items stuck into the straps, you can then slide the entire Cocoon into your purse, backpack, car seat pocket or bag. Then, just pull the entire board out to retrieve what you want when you want it. The prices range from 7x 9 inches for $15 to 8x10 inches for $18 to 9.5x15 inches for $25 from and come in a variety of colors. These boards seem to be a great, inexpensive solution to the tiny clutter we all accumulate when we travel and have kids. You could fill these with arts and crafts to slide into car seat pockets.             

I recommend getting everything organized before the season starts into what I have termed “the soccer box.” You can get as big a box as you need, either a cardboard one or a specialty one to fit whatever you feel you will use at most soccer games. I suggest towels (to wipe down bleacher seats after rain or to dry off hair), blankets, toilet paper, paper towels, bug spray, sunscreen, extra gloves and hats, several bottles of water, extra t-shirts (light and dark) in case someone forgets their jersey, extra socks (there is nothing worse than playing several games in wet socks), flashlight, paper and pen, and I’ve even thrown a calculator in there, although now with smart phones you probably don’t need it. Just think about what you used or wish you had last season and throw that in the box. There’s a three compartment trunk organizer from Picnic at Ascot that holds tons of those soccer box needs like first aid kits, extra clothing, tire pumps and toilet paper (trust me this is a must to have along for the ride!). offers the organizer, which also includes a removable cooler, for $46.75. The entire product collapses if you want to create more trunk space, but in my experience once you fill it up, you’ll never empty it. Along that line you might want to get a car emergency kit that includes battery cables, aerosol tire refill, ice scraper, and shammy cloths. AAA has a great kit with flashlight, batteries, booster cables, first aid kit, poncho, duct tape, fuses and cloths for $25, which Amazon sells for $19.50.              

My top suggestion is to keep a roll of large 33 gallon trash bags and 13 gallon kitchen bags to deal with all the clothing and shoes covered in mud, grass, turf chips and rain. Throw the large bags on the floor of your car to protect against those muddy cleats. Use the kitchen bags to hold rain and mud-soaked uniforms without letting out the stench and the stains on your upholstery. I’ve used them for over a decade and found them to be the best solution for protecting the car’s interior, not to mention the passengers’ sense of smell. I’ve hosed down the large trash bags and reused them. I know there are those WeatherTech liners, but they run about $100 and the garbage bags are less than $20. Not nearly as attractive, but you remove them when not needed.             

The one thing that seems to get out of hand quickly in the truck are those soccer chairs. Once a game is over, few of us want to spend the time shoving the chair back in its travel bag, or we end up losing those. The stack of chairs tend to collapse and are hard to keep contained in a small area. A 30x50-inch military duffle bag will hold four or five chairs easily, keeping them tightly packed in one place. The bag is canvas, so very sturdy and only costs $25 at There are smaller bags, but the large one leaves room to stuff in some blankets. The duffle bag has two shoulder straps to allow you to carry all your chairs at once to the fields. There is an option for $55, which has wheels should you feel so inclined, but is smaller, so less versatile.            

Traveling to tournaments, especially if you are the team parent, can mean tons of paperwork that never seems to stay organized and the pages you need get shuffled around and lost. Obviously, a three-ring binder would help. Beyond that, I got a great hint from a friend. She prints the various paperwork on different colored paper, depending on the purpose. So, for example, the hotel confirmations are printed on pink, the rental car on green, the airline itinerary on yellow, etc. Although you could invest in tabs, you still have to sort through to find the right tab. The different colored paper is a quick visual cue that can be readily detected. If something gets out of order you’ll be able to see that immediately. I found this a wonderful way to keep things straight.              

I don’t know if it happens to you, but my sons managed to see one cleat or one shin guard in their bags and assume both were in there, only to make the disturbing discovery that in fact there was only one when they arrived at the fields. I found that large office loose-leaf rings are a great way to keep items in pairs. You can thread the ring through cleat shoelace eyelets or through the shin guards. You can even use them to clip all the uniform pieces together by slipping the ring through the jersey and shorts. Chip bag clips can be used to hold the socks or goalkeeper gloves together. One friend uses her daughter’s hair clips for the same purpose. I don’t like putting things in zip bags because all too often one item is “used” and the moisture and smell just cultivate in the bags. However, there are small mesh laundry bags that breathe and can be used for gathering items together. Ikea sells these as bags to put delicates in the washer and come in packs of three for $9. The advantage of the bags is that you can put the soiled wet socks in one and the uniforms in another and then just throw them in the washer when you get home. They are also great for gently washing gloves, shin guards and knee pads.              

Keeping the garage organized can be the final frontier in maintaining your soccer sanity. Kids love to shove their bags into any open space on the garage floor, leaving us to trip over them. There are three simple ways to get these organized. You can use the “J” hooks sold to hang bicycles as a place to hang the bags. You decide where to put them, tag them for each kid, and ask them to hoist their bags on the hooks once they have cleaned out what they need washed. There is also a bike hanging pole you can install that serves the same purpose but they usually run $65 to $100. However, if you have limited space, the pole will keep all the soccer bags in one corner of the garage without robbing lots of space.  There are also sports equipment organizing racks for around $45, but in my experience they aren’t big enough to handle large soccer bags, especially more than one. I really advocate for the hooks which are inexpensive and easy to install. Our driveway is inclined and loose balls in the garage invariably roll into the courtyard across the street.  Rubbermaid makes a vertical ball storage rack called The Fast Track that sells for $22 on Amazon. It’s a metal cage tube with two bungee bands in the front. You simply push the balls through the elastic into the wire cage which holds up to five balls. You can also invest in a portable basketball rack with three shelves that hold a total of 12 balls. It costs $74 from Martin Sports and takes up some floor space, whereas the Rubbermaid rack hangs on the wall. Any over-the-door shoe rack hung on the garage side of the back door can keep those soccer cleats off the floor, airing out, and readily accessible. The rack also encourages kids to remove the cleats before entering the house.            

Anything we can do to minimize the disorder that comes with kids in multiple activities, each with its own set of equipment and clothing needs, means snatching extra sanity for our days. If you find you have a particular organizational dilemma, ask fellow parents how they handle it. Necessity is the mother of invention, and parents have lots of necessity to be inventive. Most solutions run under $25, so you can stay in budget while staying uncluttered. The more we get organized, the more we find our stress reduced. When we arrive at the fields relatively stress-free we can enjoy the game better and our kids will be happier. It’s all about finding the method to reduce the madness.


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Finding the Right Balance

Sam Snow

I am a parent from Southern California and I have question.

I was wondering if you have done a story in the past or possibly consider a future story regarding the clash between Club Soccer and High School Soccer. What do the experts say about practicing twice a day? Once at high school and then at club practice? My daughter plays on a team heading to National League in 3 weeks, we asked our high school coach to let our daughter sustain from high school practice (contact drills) until she returns from North Carolina.

My daughter played varsity (goalkeeper) as a freshmen last year and was injured at high school practice. She missed nearly 90% of the high school season. I was watching high school practice last year when she was injured. The previous high school coached was running a Keeper vs Field player (One-on-One) drill for nearly an hour. As time went on the field players became more reckless. So this year as a sophomore we do not want to take a chance of our daughter getting hurt.


Coaches of elite players absolutely must educate the player and the player’s parents on striking the right balance of activity. It is also very helpful when that player’s coaches are all involved in the discussion. Connecting those coaches is the responsibility of the player. We are mistaken when we think that a teenaged player has boundless energy and therefore can play in multiple demanding soccer events. No athlete has inexhaustible energy. All athletes need recovery time from strenuous events (matches, tournaments or demanding training sessions).

The coaches of high performance players are well aware that the player is on more than one team and to act as if that’s not the case is very selfish of them. The coach who really cares about the individual player, as well as the team performance, will take into account the physical and mental demands on a high performance player who is being asked to play the most number of minutes in every match on the schedule and is likely on more than one team not only in a year, but perhaps in a season. The coach who sees the big picture will give the player good counsel on when to take time off, will put that player in regeneration sessions as it fits that players soccer schedule (even if that’s out of synch with the rest of the team) and will reach out to the player’s parents to give them facts on proper sleep, hydration, days off and nutrition for the player under heavy demands.

The coach who is interested in the player’s long term career in soccer as well as performance in the immediate season will also reach out to those other coaches to work on a sensible schedule for the high performance player. Coaches who only care about their team’s performance to the exclusion of all else will not do any of the steps just described.

It is the well-educated coach who is more likely to make the balanced decision with the player. For example the three slides below are from the U.S. Soccer “E” and “D” license coaching courses and they speak directly to over training and over playing a player or team.





Coaches have an obligation to make well informed decisions that affect players’ health.

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Reading List

Susan Boyd

Each year, I try to touch on some of the great soccer books I’ve come across. Being inspired by the words and stories of players, coaches and parents can be just the boost young players and their families need to make a renewed investment in playing. The soccer-based book and magazine library is huge, not only because the sport has a world-wide audience, but because it is rising in popularity in America. These volumes generate suitable gifts, books to read aloud before bedtime, opportunities to motivate your young player, educational sources, and just good reading. I’ll divide this list up for readers under 6, aged 6-12, teens and adults.              

Young girls know the “Maisy” series, a colorful set of stories starring a mouse and her friends. On May 14 a new book comes out titled, “Maisy Plays Soccer,” by Lucy Cousins. This can be a read-aloud book or a first reader. “My First Soccer Game: A Fold-out Book,” by Capucilli and Jensen, is a photography book with big 18x18-inch fold-out pages featuring detailed photos of various exercises and team tactics for new youth players. It’s a great book for beginners to be able to visualize all that gibberish they hear at practice! If kids want to learn about the history of the game and the records produced over the years, "Cool Soccer Facts” by Abby Czeskleba dishes up the info. For kids who may not be great players yet, but have the imagination and drive to try for the stars, “Soccer Crazy” is for them. Colin McNaughton wrote the book in 1978 but recently revised it to address some of the recent advances in the sport. The School Library Review listed this as a top read.           

When kids get going in the sport and begin to move up the soccer experience ladder, they face plenty of changes. Games move from 4 vs. 4 to 8 vs. 8 to finally 11 vs. 11, and each step has its own set of rules and learning curves. So, before they become teens they have to adjust to all the growth in their team size, ability and rules, not to mention dealing with their own growth spurts or slow development — making each step a challenge. These are really formative years in acquiring the skills and maturity to shift into high school soccer. There are plenty of books to help with that transition, which also have tremendous formats. Giving a broad perspective on youth development, “Kids Book of Soccer: Skills, Strategies, and the Rules of the Game,” by Brooks Clark, can be read by most kids 9 and older, and can be shared by parents with younger kids. It breaks down the sport into its important aspects and the changes the game goes through as kids get older. If you know DK Eyewitness books, you know how beautifully designed they are with sharp photos, lots of facts and special information. “Soccer,” by Hugh Hornby, was revised for the 2010 World Cup and may have a new revision for this summer’s contest. This is a book kids can return to time and time again with fresh eyes and new discoveries. Speaking of the World Cup, watching the event together as a family can strengthen a passion for the game and provide your child with the validation of his sports choice. “The Official 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil Kids’ Handbook” provides lots of information on the teams and players participating, as well as the brackets, participating countries’ details, rules and facilities. The book can serve as a resource to answer questions during the competitions and to get kids involved in the excitement the world experiences every four years. US Youth Soccer publishes FUEL magazine for youth players with lots of great articles. You can get it digitally or you can order a box of at least 120 issues for $50 to distribute amongst your club. The magazine covers health, training, adventures and player biographies. Boys really enjoy Matt Christopher books, including “Soccer Scoop,” “Soccer Hero,” and “Soccer Duel.” Girls would enjoy Jake Maddox books, including “Soccer Surprise” and “Soccer Show-off.” He also has soccer books for boys. A rich resource book for tweens will be coming out May 27 titled “National Geographic Kids Everything Soccer,” by Blake Hoena, which has all the great behind-the-scenes photos that National Geographic is famous for.           

Once kids hit their teens and more importantly high school, they not only can get a bit jaded by soccer stories, but also have limited time to sit and read anything other than assigned material. So whatever you choose for them has to be really engaging. I think the best product is Four Four Two magazine out of the UK. This and World Soccer are the two most widely read and respected soccer publications on the market. When I gave this to my sons for a Christmas gift, it was nearly as well-received as if I had given them a car (I did say “nearly”). It comes out monthly, weighs about 2 pounds, and therefore is chockfull of information. It does have an English bias, but still covers the world of soccer, including some MLS news. One of the big factors separating great players from good players isn’t necessarily athleticism but the mental game. Older players recognize that mental edge in their favorite stars. Therefore, “Soccer Tough:  Simple Football Psychology Techniques to Improve Your Game,” by Dan Abrahams, should be one of the books passionate older youth players would appreciate. A great resource book for players to learn about the game is “World Soccer Records 2014” by Keir Radnadge. This book puts the game into perspective, showing players how powerful and amazing soccer can be and where they should be aiming to improve their skills. Upping their game means being a great defender or striker. To that end, “44 Secrets for Great Soccer Goal Scoring Skills,” by Mirsad Hasic; “The Complete Soccer Goalkeeper,” by Mulqueen and Woitalla; and “Master the Game: Soccer Defender,” by Broadbent and Allen, along with “Conditioning for Soccer,” by Raymond Verheijen, are good reads to give them a fitness edge. Coaches will tell you that many soccer games are won not by the most skilled team, but by the fittest.            

I just picked up Pele’s newest book, “Why Soccer Matters,” which he wrote to celebrate the sport and the return of the World Cup to Brazil after more than 60 years. I’ve not read much of it, but it is definitely inspiring — making it appropriate for adults and older players. We are all getting better informed about how soccer is played even though many of us don’t come from a soccer background of playing and watching the game. So it can be embarrassing if parents on the sidelines don’t know the rules, which “Official Soccer Rules Illustrated,” by Stanley Lover, helps improve. One of our main jobs as a parent is to provide snacks for our kids after practices and games, so learning how to find nutritious, inexpensive and delicious treats, which also avoid common kids’ allergies, can be daunting. “Food Guide for Soccer: Tips and Recipes from the Pros,” by Averbuch and Clark, details not only healthy snacks but ways of making sure our kids eat healthy all the time. The book focuses especially on developing steady energy throughout the day by utilizing the right foods. As parents, we always dream of our kids playing college soccer. Remember to be careful what you wish for since the NCAA really limits the number of full-ride scholarships in soccer, meaning most, if not all players, earn only a small percentage of the total cost of attending a college in the form of an athletic scholarship, as these are spread out over the entire team. Players and parents should focus more on the experience than the funds. Several good books help with the process. “Get Recruited to Play Women’s College Soccer,” by Lucia Bucklin, was published in late December 2013, so it is up to date enough to offer good advice. There is no specific book out there for men’s college soccer recruiting but there is a recent book on athletic recruiting, “Get Recruited to Play College Athletics,” by S. Farrell, which is two years old. Remember too that there are other college organizations out there besides the NCAA. Learning from someone who has been there, done that can make the entire process of being a soccer parent not only more enjoyable but also more informed. Dan Woog has had a front seat to youth soccer for years both with recreational and select teams. He has been a coach, a spectator, a state hall of fame inductee, and an important voice for youth players as a writer. His book, “We Kick Balls:  True Stories from the Youth Soccer Wars,” touches on both humorous and serious issues affecting youth players on and off the field, including the thornier ones such as drugs, bullying, prejudice and sexual orientation. The book may have some uncomfortable sections, but as parents we can’t live in the world with blinders on avoiding these truths. I recommend it as a significant eye witness account of the life our kids have chosen.            

The old caveat of “Reading is Fundamental” holds true in all of our lives, even in our soccer lives.  Hopefully some of these texts can be not only useful but also enlightening. As we encourage our kids to pursue their dreams and to enjoy the journey, we should also be sharing in that adventure both as supporters and as resources. I challenge parents to share with one another any books or magazines they have found worthwhile. As we join together we become a reading soccer village that raises our children.

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