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Coaches Blog

Sam's Blog is a bi-weekly addition to the US Youth Soccer Blog. Sam Snow is the Coaching Director for US Youth Soccer.

 

In-house teams

Sam Snow

The topic at hand here is possible approaches to the format for in-house teams.
 
I am writing this to inquire about your philosophies when it comes to the organization of In-House teams. I am attempting to institute a better balanced In-House program by having our team placements done more randomly, rather than teams being formed by family and friends. In our current set up, teams can rarely change from year to year.
 
I feel that it will be best for the player's overall development to have the opportunity to play with new teammates and coaches each season...but I am getting a lot of push back on this idea.
 
I was hoping you could share your thoughts with me on what is the most effective way to organize recreational players into teams so that our club can develop more well-rounded skillful players.
 
The most common method of team formation for in-house teams is to redistribute a portion of the players each year. I think though the teams should be reshuffled every two years, if the club has teams at such a young age. The preferred method of player development for Under-10 and younger teams is to have player pools for training. The approach is generally known as ability based grouping. The players can then be moved from group to group thus providing the best growth for their needs at that point in time. So you could have a group A, group B and group C for example and the players would move from group to group as needed. The groups can have matches within the group and then also between the groups. The makeup of the teams for these matches can change as the coaches see the need to help players develop.
 
Spectators are not keen on this approach because they feel it offers them less viewing pleasure on match day since there is less of an 'us' versus 'them' setting. The adults need to be reminded that the youth soccer game is about the players not the spectators, coaches or referees. However, the parents can now focus on their child's individual development. This will lessen the drive for team results measured by goals for and against, won-loss record, etc. The adults need to be reminded that the youth soccer experience is about the players just as elementary school is about the students. At school they learn academics. At the club they learn soccer. In both settings they are students.
 
Here are some pertinent notes from U.S. Soccer:
 
UNITED STATES SOCCER FEDERATION BEST PRACTICES FOR COACHING SOCCER IN THE UNITED STATES
 
PRE ACADEMY LEVEL:
U-6 through U-12 age groups
U-6: K and 1st graders
 
Soccer at these ages should be discouraged in any form other than as a fun activity for kids that happens to include a soccer ball. There should be groups of players rather than teams. Fees should be nominal. Attendance should be optional. Creating a joyful environment is mandatory. 
 
GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF WHAT SHOULD BE HAPPENING IN MATCHES
 
U.S. Soccer recommends that there be no organized matches at this age. Consistently set up mini games at practice for your kids to compete with and against each other, according to their age.
 
U-8: 1st and 2nd Graders
 
U. S. Soccer recommends that there be no organized matches at this age. Consistently set up mini games at practice for your kids to compete with and against each other, according to their age. There will be no need to keep score or even be very involved, except to enjoy the players and their effort and joy. Every player should look forward to opportunities to have the ball at his or her feet and to score. It is the coach’s responsibility to encourage this fear-free culture. For the 7- and 8-year-old groups, these games should only be seen as another fun activity that happens to include a soccer ball. They are not ready for specific soccer type information and there should be no emphasis on team concepts or positions. They will have plenty of opportunities to play in "real soccer games," as they get older. Most of the information from coaches during these times will pertain to each player’s individual relationship with the soccer ball — to want it, how to find it, deal with it, feel more comfortable with it, keep it close, etc.
 
Please also take a look at the academy set up for the U10 age group on the North Carolina Youth Soccer web site: http://www.ncsoccer.org/home/default.asp?menu_category=Academy.

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Application

Susan Boyd

I distinctly remember being out in a rural area at a soccer match and seeing one of the fathers walking up with a Starbucks coffee. First of all, I couldn’t believe that there was a Starbucks anywhere close, and second that he could have found it among the maze of empty country roads that surrounded us. So I asked how he came across it. "I used the Starbucks application on my GPS," he said. And in that moment, I was ushered into the wonderful world of apps. These ingenious programs, now available on nearly every cell phone in America, can simplify your life and add to your soccer trips. Stuff you never even thought about needing at your fingertips suddenly becomes indispensable. Here are a few of my favorite applications that I use regularly. Most are free while others cost no more than $4.99.

Let’s start with coffee. Most of us need it to wake up, stay warm during those cold, drizzly games and provide a bit of comfort while waiting for a game to start. Starbucks provides a buffet of options under its applications. You can locate a store, refill your Starbucks card, play games and create a Starbucks scanning box so you can drive-thru, be scanned and drive-off. Despite Starbucks proliferation, there are places where they don’t exist, or you may not be a Starbucks connoisseur. So you might want the Coffee Shop Locator ($2.99) on iTunes and free through Android: which uses your phone’s location service to show coffee available within a two mile radius.  

How often have you arrived at your destination only to find you’re missing a shin guard, socks or shorts? Now you need to find a store quickly that can sell you what you are missing.There are applications for Dick’s, Champs, Sport’s Authority, and several other major sports stores on both play.google.com and iTunes. Most of these are free. You can also download Google Maps, which allow you to request stores in the area and gives you directions. 

In case of emergency, Androidmedicalapps.com has a handy app that provides urgent medical information. iTunes provides scores of medical applications which will prove helpful in game situations. However, I highly encourage you to download a concussion application that details how to test for concussion and what to do if you suspect a concussion. iTunes has an app called Concussion Recognition and Response from Par, Inc. ($3.99), which is designed specifically for coaches and parents. Children’s National Medical Center has also developed an application ($3.99) for smart phones that you can download to diagnose concussions. While rashes, cuts and bruises are important to treat, concussions are far more serious. So having information readily available, especially the way to test for a concussion, can be life and brain saving.

Most smart phones carry a stop watch already uploaded to the phone, but there are apps which provide an entire box of tools that should prove helpful for a soccer parent. These tools include a flashlight, stop watch, ruler, calculator and translator. The latter comes in handy when you have players from other countries on your team. While the kids often speak English well, their parents and other family members may not. I have found that having a translator to help communicate with these parents on the sidelines has been invaluable. It helps to include them in the team, and in the social network of the team. You can find a great iPhone application at iTunes called Appbox Pro. Unfortunately you’ll need two Android applications one for tools, and a second for a translator

One application I have found really invaluable, both in saving time and keeping tabs on flight changes, has been a flight tracker. I can hang around the house, field, or hotel until just before the plane lands. I also can discover flight delays, rerouting and rescheduling that let me plan better. Flight Tracker on iPhone is the application I use, but there are literally dozens of applications to choose from. For smart phones, Flight View has a link to a mobile app. The additional advantage of these applications is that they provide airport parking maps, and many of the applications have an airport terminal map for major airports. These tools can make your trip to that opposite coast tournament smoother.

The application I found out about just a few days ago is the one that got me thinking about a blog on applications. This particular app really got me excited because I realized how important it could be for anyone traveling with small children or teenagers who think drinking six sports drinks after a match is necessary for hydration. Charmin Toilet Tissue has an app to locate the nearest clean toilets! Aptly named Sit or Squat, the application uses your phone’s GPS locator to detail the nearest clean restrooms for you. The application can be downloaded to either iphones or Androids so it covers (excuse the pun) every bum. Additionally, Charmin has rolled out restroom renovations and deluxe port-a-johns across the country for special events. They may be visiting your state fair or music festival this year, so check their website to see where they will clean up next.

I am sure there are dozen more applications that you could come up with. I do encourage parents to add these applications, because they are useful. With the advantages of smart phones, we can employ them in so many ways to make our soccer lives easier. Besides being able to locate family members when separated across dozens of soccer fields, updating scores and big plays when you have to be at different games or sending photos of that amazing goal, our phones can provide us with some helping hands in other ways. So embrace the technologies, and when you have the time, search for some applications that interest you. It could be a pizza locator, a soccer game to occupy the trip home or video of the latest EPL game. Really whatever you can think of, you can find. So apply yourself.

 

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The Hook

Susan Boyd

Youth sports in general promote discipline, fitness, teamwork and most importantly, fun.  Soccer specifically has the added dimension of being a world-wide sport, which connects its players to a broad spectrum of cultures, languages and traditions.  Whether you’re lucky enough to travel overseas and play soccer or watch it on TV, you can connect immediately to a country through the experience of soccer.  The power of soccer has channeled into country, continent and world competitions, bringing together both players and fans to celebrate the game.  Soccer is being used in a more significant capacity.  Several organizations around the world are using soccer as a tool to empower the youth of countries where there has been political and economic upheaval.  Most of these groups run on a shoe-string budget and depend on the monetary and equipment donations from fellow soccer players around the world.

In Cambodia, the Salt Academy uses soccer to help eradicate human trafficking by bringing young girls into soccer leagues where they can be protected. The Salt Academy also helps them become strong, exceptional athletes with the self-esteem to resist the lure of recruiters.  This Mighty Girls program has expanded into three border provinces in Cambodia.  The girls play in leagues similar to those our own kids join with designations of U12 and up.  Recently their U15 girls’ team won the first Cambodian National Tournament, and their U14 team won an International Tournament.  In addition to the football training, the academy promotes high educational standards in hope of graduating many of the girls on to a university.

Project Congo takes girls from the dangerous and impoverished villages in the center of warfare and tribal traditions, which subjugate and terrorize women.  The project seeks to educate girls so they can graduate high school, something only a small percentage of females accomplish in the Congo.  It uses soccer to build self-esteem and will power, giving the girls tools to move ahead socially and educationally in an independent manner.  The project seeks sister teams in the US to help sponsor and support the teams in the Congo.  Soccer creates this connection between two cultures that normally have no connection.  Sponsoring a team can offer a US girls’ team a fantastic opportunity to learn their own lessons in altruism and social awareness.

The Give N Go Project provides soccer equipment to orphanages around the world.  According to their website, there are 143 million abandoned children in the world.  Since soccer is the most popular sport in the world, the organization can connect with these children through the sport.  They provide reconditioned used gear, new gear and clinics for orphanages and occasionally for foster children in the United States.  They use the clinics to impact these children’s lives to strive for excellence in all they do.  They encourage the kids to work as hard in the classroom as they do on the pitch.  They also want the children to develop pride through the ownership of their own soccer equipment and through success in soccer. 

Grassroots Soccer takes a different approach to using soccer.  The idea behind the program is to teach African kids about HIV/AIDS through various soccer drills.  The goal is to reduce the incidence of the disease in Africa by helping kids understand how it can be contracted and how to avoid it.  As Michelle Obama said about the program "The solution lies within us. . .and soccer is the hook." Presently it operates in South Africa, Zimbabwe and Zambia, with satellite programs in Ethiopia, Kenya and even Guatemala to name just a few.  The program was founded by former soccer players, Dr. Tommy Clark and Ethan Zohn, who both played professionally in Zimbabwe.  When they saw the devastation of AIDS in that country, they decided that they could use soccer as the means to educate and stem the course of the disease.

Soccer Without Borders in Granada, Nicaragua works with girls ages 7 – 19 to develop recreational opportunities equal to those available to their male peers, and to offer strong support which the girls might not find in their community.  Recently the program expanded to Uganda (soccerwithoutborders.org/Uganda).  There it works with both refugee and national youth to train them in soccer.  Since Uganda has opened its borders to those displaced from the Horn of Africa and Sudan due to economic and political problems, the border villages have huge refugee populations, which face language and religious barriers, but most importantly have lost educational opportunities.  The SWB program attempts to provide these opportunities to both refugees and nationals as well as offer soccer training at least twice a week to give the kids some fun and some discipline that they can carry over into the classroom.  The main campus is in the capitol Kampala, from which teams go to the borders to conduct clinics and support schools in the area. The agency also works in Oakland, Calif. to provide the same type of support for recently arrived refugee and immigrant youth.  Since soccer carries great importance in the lives of these immigrants, it is a means to bring youth together in a safe environment and develop skills both on and off the field to help them assimilate into the US on the field, and in the classroom.

These groups are just the tip of the iceberg of programs using soccer to connect with youth and to help them build a future.  As Give N Go states on its mission page, "the childhood you have determines the adult you will be."  Therefore using soccer as the hook to draw in young people these agencies can build on the skills, pride and love they have in soccer to translate into the same things for education, self-esteem and self-discipline.  Soccer is being used to protect young women from sexual abuse, to teach young people to avoid AIDS and to become stronger students.  The language of soccer translates into everyday life.  The same discipline you need to develop a particular soccer move can be used to learn the times table.  The joy you bring to the sport can be brought to appreciating literature.  Even more importantly, we can join with our fellow soccer brothers and sisters in making these dreams come true through our donations both in equipment and monetary or by adopting a team to support financially and vocally with letters and videos.  Soccer can be a bridge to the rest of the globe. 

 

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Coach your kid in soccer

Sam Snow

Here are five fundamentals to coaching your own child in soccer. Ditch the over-the-top act for a style that will keep your kid happy and engaged.
 
Level the playing field

Sit your child down and ask if you can "join the team." You’ll probably get an emphatic "yes." The point is to let the kid know you’re both on the same side.
 
Be consistent

When critiquing play, always lead by citing something commendable ("Great job dribbling up field!") before giving feedback ("Now try to keep your head up"). Finish positively with another  encouraging comment ("You’ll get it, keep working hard!").
 
Look beyond your kid

If you’re not a coach, hang out with other parents. Their comments (like "That was a sweet pass" or "They’re crowding the ball") can help you lose the tunnel vision for your child and see the whole team.
 
Stoke inspiration

If you see your child’ motivation starts to drag, whip up a game at home to focus on skills while still having fun. For kicking strength, tack up a target on a brick wall and see if he can hit it with the ball. For ball control, offer them ice cream for stringing together five juggles.
 
[Editor’s note: Intrinsic rewards (praise, acknowledgement, fulfillment from hard work) are better long-term motivators than extrinsic rewards, which tend to lose their positive affect in time.]
 
Discipline privately

No kid responds well to public scolding, so if yours is acting out or not being a team player, pull her aside; then you can switch to parent mode. Explain why it’s important that she accept the consequences for her actions just like any other teammate does. Don’t make a scene. If she’s not receptive, say you’ll finish the talk at home – but try to avoid mixing at-home disciplinary tactics with on-the-field ones.
 
Sources: Jimmy Nielsen, goalkeeper for Sporting Kansas City; Larry Lauer, Ph.D., of the Institute for the Study of Youth Sports at Michigan State University

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