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Coaches Blog

Sam's Blog is a bi-weekly addition to the US Youth Soccer Blog. Sam Snow is the Coaching Director for US Youth Soccer.

 

Being a Good Coach

Sam Snow

Enjoy this insight from our former Women's National Team coach Greg Ryan on being a good coach.

Coaching players to develop to their full potential is more of an art than a science. Each aspect of player development must be addressed at the appropriate time and reinforced until it becomes second nature to the young player. The coach must allow the player the freedom to develop by learning from millions of experiences. The coach must resist the temptation to interrupt the players, realizing that learning takes place by experiencing the game.

Good coaches will create sessions in which the players are constantly playing the game whether it is 1
vs. 1 or up to 11vs. 11. The exercises will look and feel just like the real game. The players will love these coaches for giving them back the game and allowing them to express themselves on the field. They will develop players who "feel" the game, rather than players who only "think" the game.

Good coaches provide feedback throughout the session usually without stopping the flow of play. Sometimes, they are cheerleaders, just shouting…."great pass".   Sometimes, they have a quiet word in the flow of play to give a player an idea about how to solve a problem on the field. When they see a universal problem, they will stop the session, sort it out and restart as soon as possible.

A good coach does not try to solve every problem in each session. They understand that development whether individual or team is a long term process. They also understand that players can only assimilate a little information at a time, so they choose their comments carefully. In the end, it does not matter what the coach knows or says it only matters what the players can receive and implement.

The best chance a coach has to develop a player is to insure that they love the game. The best way to do this is to let them play the game.