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Coaches Blog

Sam's Blog is a bi-weekly addition to the US Youth Soccer Blog. Sam Snow is the Coaching Director for US Youth Soccer.

 

Lessons from USA vs. Argentina

Sam Snow

Well, of course, last night we all watched the U.S. Men's National Team play against the number one national team in the world, Argentina. There are so many things for us to take away from the match. Indeed there are even a few items to take away from what we did before this match. 
 
Let's start with three in a row against some of the very best in the world, Argentina, England and Spain; all in preparation for 2010 World Cup qualifying matches for us here in CONCACAF. This is a great sign of the health of our sport.
 
Number one, USSF has the financial wherewithal to arrange such matches, which cost a pretty penny. Second it is clear that we have the confidence and foresight to take on very good teams in preparation for World Cup qualifiers. This states indirectly that we want the experience that pushes our players and staff to their limits and helps them to grow beyond those limits. Further it tells every other team in CONCACAF how serious we are about qualifying for South Africa. These are the circumstances leading up to and surrounding last night's match.
 
Now, as to the match itself it was good to see us play a rather complete game. We went forward and attacked and created good scoring chances. That's a highly significant fact given the caliber of the Argentinean team. The U.S. squad did this with a mix of veterans and youngsters on the field. Bob Bradley showed real confidence in his personnel to give a good number of new faces to our National Team playing time in a high level match. This is great preparation for the depth of our team that no doubt will compete in South Africa in 2010. Yes, our play was a bit choppy at times, but I believe that's normal for most National Teams which get little time together to gel as a team. We are still in the testing phase of our pool of players. Several of them tested very well yesterday.
 
Now mind you it was a friendly and doesn't count in qualification or a league standing, although it will influence our FIFA ranking. Yet Coach Bradley and his staff took some chances with their approach to the match. Those chances were worth any possible risk given the experience gained and lessons learned. I wonder how many youth coaches actually plan such events for their developing players. How many adults involved with youth soccer will recognize what our National Team staff did which is that many of the players on the full Men's National Team are still quite young developing players?
 
Several players for the USA came into the match as subs. It's a real challenge to a player to step into a match already underway and get instantly into the flow of the game and literally up to match speed. In your development of your youth players do you intentionally set up these experiences? One of the great lessons from the World Cup winning team of France 1998 was the preparation of the team by Aime Jacquet and his staff. One aspect of which was that every player on the team experienced being a starter, coming on as a substitute and being taken off. In this way the team was mentally prepared for any mix of players in the lineup. Does your team while on the road to the US Youth Soccer National Championship Series take such an approach?
 
Late in the match the USA had a player ejected and found themselves playing a man down against the number one ranked team on the planet. Now I'm sure that as a coach, you have experienced your team playing a man down at some point. Did you prepare for such an experience? Have you taken your team through that scenario during a training session or a practice match with another team in your club? Waiting until the situation arises in a league match is not preparation. So in training run the players through situations of playing numbers up and numbers down and how do they adjust tactically and the possible repositioning of the personnel on the field.
 
Those are just two of the occurrences from yesterday's match that also occur in youth matches now and then. Coaches need to put into their curriculum for player and team development these types of scenarios and teach players and staff how to handle them.
Well, of course, last night we all watched the U.S. Men's National Team play against the number one national team in the world, Argentina. There are so many things for us to take away from the match. Indeed there are even a few items to take away from what we did before this match. 
 
Let's start with three in a row against some of the very best in the world, Argentina, England and Spain; all in preparation for 2010 World Cup qualifying matches for us here in CONCACAF. This is a great sign of the health of our sport.
 
Number one, USSF has the financial wherewithal to arrange such matches, which cost a pretty penny. Second it is clear that we have the confidence and foresight to take on very good teams in preparation for World Cup qualifiers. This states indirectly that we want the experience that pushes our players and staff to their limits and helps them to grow beyond those limits. Further it tells every other team in CONCACAF how serious we are about qualifying for South Africa. These are the circumstances leading up to and surrounding last night's match.
 
Now, as to the match itself it was good to see us play a rather complete game. We went forward and attacked and created good scoring chances. That's a highly significant fact given the caliber of the Argentinean team. The U.S. squad did this with a mix of veterans and youngsters on the field. Bob Bradley showed real confidence in his personnel to give a good number of new faces to our National Team playing time in a high level match. This is great preparation for the depth of our team that no doubt will compete in South Africa in 2010. Yes, our play was a bit choppy at times, but I believe that's normal for most National Teams which get little time together to gel as a team. We are still in the testing phase of our pool of players. Several of them tested very well yesterday.
 
Now mind you it was a friendly and doesn't count in qualification or a league standing, although it will influence our FIFA ranking. Yet Coach Bradley and his staff took some chances with their approach to the match. Those chances were worth any possible risk given the experience gained and lessons learned. I wonder how many youth coaches actually plan such events for their developing players. How many adults involved with youth soccer will recognize what our National Team staff did which is that many of the players on the full Men's National Team are still quite young developing players?
 
Several players for the USA came into the match as subs. It's a real challenge to a player to step into a match already underway and get instantly into the flow of the game and literally up to match speed. In your development of your youth players do you intentionally set up these experiences? One of the great lessons from the World Cup winning team of France 1998 was the preparation of the team by Aime Jacquet and his staff. One aspect of which was that every player on the team experienced being a starter, coming on as a substitute and being taken off. In this way the team was mentally prepared for any mix of players in the lineup. Does your team while on the road to the US Youth Soccer National Championship Series take such an approach?
 
Late in the match the USA had a player ejected and found themselves playing a man down against the number one ranked team on the planet. Now I'm sure that as a coach, you have experienced your team playing a man down at some point. Did you prepare for such an experience? Have you taken your team through that scenario during a training session or a practice match with another team in your club? Waiting until the situation arises in a league match is not preparation. So in training run the players through situations of playing numbers up and numbers down and how do they adjust tactically and the possible repositioning of the personnel on the field.
 
Well, of course, last night we all watched the U.S. Men's National Team play against the number one national team in the world, Argentina. There are so many things for us to take away from the match. Indeed there are even a few items to take away from what we did before this match. 
 
Let's start with three in a row against some of the very best in the world, Argentina, England and Spain; all in preparation for 2010 World Cup qualifying matches for us here in CONCACAF. This is a great sign of the health of our sport.
 
Number one, USSF has the financial wherewithal to arrange such matches, which cost a pretty penny. Second it is clear that we have the confidence and foresight to take on very good teams in preparation for World Cup qualifiers. This states indirectly that we want the experience that pushes our players and staff to their limits and helps them to grow beyond those limits. Further it tells every other team in CONCACAF how serious we are about qualifying for South Africa. These are the circumstances leading up to and surrounding last night's match.
 
Now, as to the match itself it was good to see us play a rather complete game. We went forward and attacked and created good scoring chances. That's a highly significant fact given the caliber of the Argentinean team. The U.S. squad did this with a mix of veterans and youngsters on the field. Bob Bradley showed real confidence in his personnel to give a good number of new faces to our National Team playing time in a high level match. This is great preparation for the depth of our team that no doubt will compete in South Africa in 2010. Yes, our play was a bit choppy at times, but I believe that's normal for most National Teams which get little time together to gel as a team. We are still in the testing phase of our pool of players. Several of them tested very well yesterday.
 
Now mind you it was a friendly and doesn't count in qualification or a league standing, although it will influence our FIFA ranking. Yet Coach Bradley and his staff took some chances with their approach to the match. Those chances were worth any possible risk given the experience gained and lessons learned. I wonder how many youth coaches actually plan such events for their developing players. How many adults involved with youth soccer will recognize what our National Team staff did which is that many of the players on the full Men's National Team are still quite young developing players?
 
Several players for the USA came into the match as subs. It's a real challenge to a player to step into a match already underway and get instantly into the flow of the game and literally up to match speed. In your development of your youth players do you intentionally set up these experiences? One of the great lessons from the World Cup winning team of France 1998 was the preparation of the team by Aime Jacquet and his staff. One aspect of which was that every player on the team experienced being a starter, coming on as a substitute and being taken off. In this way the team was mentally prepared for any mix of players in the lineup. Does your team while on the road to the US Youth Soccer National Championship Series take such an approach?
 
Late in the match the USA had a player ejected and found themselves playing a man down against the number one ranked team on the planet. Now I'm sure that as a coach, you have experienced your team playing a man down at some point. Did you prepare for such an experience? Have you taken your team through that scenario during a training session or a practice match with another team in your club? Waiting until the situation arises in a league match is not preparation. So in training run the players through situations of playing numbers up and numbers down and how do they adjust tactically and the possible repositioning of the personnel on the field.
 
Those are just two of the occurrences from yesterday's match that also occur in youth matches now and then. Coaches need to put into their curriculum for player and team development these types of scenarios and teach players and staff how to handle them.