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Coaches Blog

Sam's Blog is a bi-weekly addition to the US Youth Soccer Blog. Sam Snow is the Coaching Director for US Youth Soccer.

 

Transition

Sam Snow

Last week's blog has brought up some good discussion on transition in soccer and those moments that make up a good match. In brief here are two of the discussions I've had on the topic of ""Soccer is a Game of Moments.""

The first one was about a 2010 FIFA World Cup match between the U.S. and Algeria in which Jozy Altidore missed a chance to score. 

The exchange began with:

"Sam, loved the blog this week. I actually had some e-mail conversation today with some friends from around the country about this exact topic. The conversation was sparked by an article about why the U.S. struggles to produce natural goal scorers and forwards. Your blog topic was a major point coming across in our e-mails." 

I replied with this comment:

"Jozy had his 'moment' and let his mind get ahead of the moment at hand. It's an interesting part of our game that you need to think ahead to anticipate the action, the next move, but there are those times (with a sitter in front of goal in this case) that you need to be entirely in the moment and ONLY that moment. We'll watch a match tonight (FC Dallas against New York) and see that dichotomy unfold again and again."

In observing that match between the New York Red Bulls and FC Dallas, we often saw the players in the moment of when to think ahead a move or two and when to zero in on the moment at hand.  Naturally, mistakes occurred.  Players at every level of play make these mistakes of being in the wrong moment.  The only difference between professional players and youth players is that the pros make the mistakes less often.  In the case of these two MLS teams, the mistake was usually one of being in the present moment and not thinking ahead a move or two, which is also known as reading the game. Lapses in concentration occur even with national team players too.  So, those of us coaching youth players must expect mistakes in recognizing the 'moment'.  Learning how to stay focused for an entire match is a long-term process.  Gradual improvement in mental focus leads to better tactical decision making, reading the game.  Here is yet another reason for Small-Sided Games for preteen players and continuing to use Small-Sided Games in training sessions for teenaged players.

Here's another comment on the topic:

"I liked your recent blog about helping players learn about transition play. I cannot find any exercises to help practice this. Can you send me a link or a practice session for this? I am coaching a U-13 girls' team that is having some difficulty learning this concept
."

In reply I wrote:

"Transition by itself is not really a full training session topic, but a tactical moment which needs to be taught and worked at by players and coaches at every training session. Anytime you have two groups of players playing against one another, from 1v1 to 11v11, the moment the attackers lose the ball they must instantly transition to defense, the team which just gained possession of the ball must now all think and play on the attack. It is the mental switch changing quickly followed by quick physical action. This is the area where too many American players are slow to react, or better yet, to anticipate and be prepared to react, even before the moment of transition occurs.

So, in your training session some of the activities need to be an 'us' versus 'them' situation, which could be numbers even, 4v4 for example, or numbers uneven, 5 v 2 perhaps. I have attached to this message a series of 4v4 training activities which you could play and emphasize transition within these games."

*If you would like to have a copy of those activities just drop me a note.