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Coaches Blog

Sam's Blog is a bi-weekly addition to the US Youth Soccer Blog. Sam Snow is the Coaching Director for US Youth Soccer.

 

In-house teams

Sam Snow

The topic at hand here is possible approaches to the format for in-house teams.
 
I am writing this to inquire about your philosophies when it comes to the organization of In-House teams. I am attempting to institute a better balanced In-House program by having our team placements done more randomly, rather than teams being formed by family and friends. In our current set up, teams can rarely change from year to year.
 
I feel that it will be best for the player's overall development to have the opportunity to play with new teammates and coaches each season...but I am getting a lot of push back on this idea.
 
I was hoping you could share your thoughts with me on what is the most effective way to organize recreational players into teams so that our club can develop more well-rounded skillful players.
 
The most common method of team formation for in-house teams is to redistribute a portion of the players each year. I think though the teams should be reshuffled every two years, if the club has teams at such a young age. The preferred method of player development for Under-10 and younger teams is to have player pools for training. The approach is generally known as ability based grouping. The players can then be moved from group to group thus providing the best growth for their needs at that point in time. So you could have a group A, group B and group C for example and the players would move from group to group as needed. The groups can have matches within the group and then also between the groups. The makeup of the teams for these matches can change as the coaches see the need to help players develop.
 
Spectators are not keen on this approach because they feel it offers them less viewing pleasure on match day since there is less of an 'us' versus 'them' setting. The adults need to be reminded that the youth soccer game is about the players not the spectators, coaches or referees. However, the parents can now focus on their child's individual development. This will lessen the drive for team results measured by goals for and against, won-loss record, etc. The adults need to be reminded that the youth soccer experience is about the players just as elementary school is about the students. At school they learn academics. At the club they learn soccer. In both settings they are students.
 
Here are some pertinent notes from U.S. Soccer:
 
UNITED STATES SOCCER FEDERATION BEST PRACTICES FOR COACHING SOCCER IN THE UNITED STATES
 
PRE ACADEMY LEVEL:
U-6 through U-12 age groups
U-6: K and 1st graders
 
Soccer at these ages should be discouraged in any form other than as a fun activity for kids that happens to include a soccer ball. There should be groups of players rather than teams. Fees should be nominal. Attendance should be optional. Creating a joyful environment is mandatory. 
 
GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF WHAT SHOULD BE HAPPENING IN MATCHES
 
U.S. Soccer recommends that there be no organized matches at this age. Consistently set up mini games at practice for your kids to compete with and against each other, according to their age.
 
U-8: 1st and 2nd Graders
 
U. S. Soccer recommends that there be no organized matches at this age. Consistently set up mini games at practice for your kids to compete with and against each other, according to their age. There will be no need to keep score or even be very involved, except to enjoy the players and their effort and joy. Every player should look forward to opportunities to have the ball at his or her feet and to score. It is the coach’s responsibility to encourage this fear-free culture. For the 7- and 8-year-old groups, these games should only be seen as another fun activity that happens to include a soccer ball. They are not ready for specific soccer type information and there should be no emphasis on team concepts or positions. They will have plenty of opportunities to play in "real soccer games," as they get older. Most of the information from coaches during these times will pertain to each player’s individual relationship with the soccer ball — to want it, how to find it, deal with it, feel more comfortable with it, keep it close, etc.
 
Please also take a look at the academy set up for the U10 age group on the North Carolina Youth Soccer web site: http://www.ncsoccer.org/home/default.asp?menu_category=Academy.
 

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