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Coaches Blog

Sam's Blog is a bi-weekly addition to the US Youth Soccer Blog. Sam Snow is the Coaching Director for US Youth Soccer.

 

Foreign Development

Sam Snow

Many soccer fans enjoyed watching Germany play in the 2010 FIFA World Cup. They played some exciting soccer and went quite far in the tournament. Often, when a nation has a good run in the World Cup or they win, as Spain did, then clubs at many levels try to copy the system of play or maybe even the entire developmental process. I believe that we should always look to how players are developed around the world. Let's look closely at what Spain, Germany or others have done, but I do not believe we should ever take someone else's program in whole. The circumstances and developmental stages of the game are different in each country. Few nations have the situation we have with soccer in America. Let's take the best from other nations for our particular needs. But let's not ever copy carte blanche the methods of another nation. Here is the Sports Illustrated article which spurred these thoughts when it was sent to me by a youth soccer coach.

Here's my initial response to the article:

I know there are good ideas in Germany (DFB) for us to copy. Some of the infrastructure they have created is beyond us presently. As the richest Football Association in the world, the DFB can underwrite a lot of the expenses for elite player development. Plus, they have the will to do so.

The question in my mind is, are we doing all we can with our resources? Personally I think we should pour in personnel and resources to Zone 1 (U-6 to U-12) of the U.S. Soccer Player Development Pyramid. When the base of pyramid becomes stronger and broader then the Zones above it benefit.

Furthermore, some interesting insights from Coach Löw are made in the article. I like the direction of playing the game with the emphasis on attack. I know that approach suits our American participants in the game.

Now, the point that he divided the pitch into 18 sections to be clear on each player's job on the field is wonderful for National Teams, pro teams and perhaps for college teams and U-19 select teams. The younger you go though, I think the reins need to be loosened. 

So for the U-6 age group, go ahead and run 'willy nilly' all over the field. Chase the ball to your heart's delight.

With the U-8 age group, instill a more clear idea on the attacking half and the defending half of the field and some general ideas on how to play there.

For the U-10 age group, teach the concept of the horizontal and vertical thirds of the field.

With the U-12 age groups, take the thirds (horizontal and vertical) of the field and really ingrain it into the players' minds. Let's get across ideas on how to play on the flanks and the central channel. Also teach the general tactical ideas for each horizontal third; i.e., less dribbling out of the defending third and more passing.

At U-14, let's work on the outsides of the defending and attacking thirds, the corners of the field if you will, and how to play in those zones.

With U-16 teams, train in detail about playing in the midfield third and how to get into the attacking third with tactics beyond always playing the through ball.

At U-19, by all means break down the pitch into those 18 quadrants.