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Coaches Blog

Sam's Blog is a bi-weekly addition to the US Youth Soccer Blog. Sam Snow is the Coaching Director for US Youth Soccer.

 

Continuing Education

Sam Snow

Soccer coaches in America have a multitude of both formal and informal coaching education available to them. The formal education is the courses such as the “E” or “Y” or “C” Licenses through the state and national associations. Formal education could also be the Master’s Degree in Coaching Soccer through Ohio University. http://www.ohio.edu/graduate/programinfo/CoachingOnlineSoccer-Info.cfm

Informal education may include mentoring within a club, clinics, webinars or conventions. In the last category I recently attended the 2015 US Youth Soccer Workshop / NSCAA Convention in Philadelphia. This was my 34th NSCAA Convention and my 20th US Youth Soccer Workshop http://www.usyouthsoccer.org/workshop/nscaa/. For the last three years the two events have taken place side-by-side. The contract has been renewed for another three years. I foresee the partnership continuing for many more years.

This gathering of coaches, vendors, referees and administrators is unsurpassed in the world. Where else could professional team coaches rub elbows with local youth coaches? Indeed with over 9000 people in attendance every level of soccer is represented. The convention is a fantastic education opportunity. Sessions are given for administrators, coaches and referees. There are demonstrations done with players of all ages and both genders. Classroom sessions take place from Wednesday through Sunday of the convention week. There are so many wonderful sessions going on that you couldn’t possibly attend them all. Truthfully you will need to attend two or three years in a row to take it all in.

As I write this blog post I’m flying from Denver back to Dallas. I, along with Mike Freitag, gave some sessions for a coach clinic hosted by the Broomfield S.C. http://www.broomfieldsoccerclub.org/Default.aspx?tabid=690416&mid=714779&newskeyid=HN1&newsid=47512&ctl=newsdetail Bill Stara organized the clinic for all coaches in the northern Denver area. Over the course of the day about 100 coaches, players, their parents and administrators attended.

All youth soccer clubs must budget and plan for continuing education of the coaches, administrators and parents in the club. The players deserve this effort by the adults. Investment in the growth of its personnel is a club’s highest priority.

So whether it’s a small clinic in a club or attendance at a national convention, coaches must be lifelong students of the game. Indeed refining one’s craft of coaching is an on-going process. If you are a soccer coach then you must be committed to your formal and informal education. A coach has every right to expect the club to host a clinic at least once a year. But the coach has an obligation to attend the clinic. On the club wide ‘clinic day’ all training sessions and matches should be postponed.

Youth soccer clubs should also budget to annually send some of the staff to a state symposium or a national convention.  The experience is eye opening!

Continuing education of coaches should be a cultural norm in all American soccer clubs. I look forward to seeing you at the 2016 US Youth Soccer Workshop in Baltimore next January.

 

Comments

 
Kyle Jackson in Little Rock, AR said: Sam, I attended the NSCAA Convention for the first time this year after coaching for over 20 years. It was worth every minute and I would recommend to any soccer coach that you try to attend the convention at least once in your career. But my comment is to your statement of the renewal of the NSCAA and US Youth partnership for the convention. As many are aware, the USSF has announced they will no longer accept NSCAA licensing for their pre-requisites to get into courses. There are a lot of great coaches such as yourself that teach courses within both organizations. So, why has US Youth chosen not to recognize NSCAA licensing, when both organizations have signed a renewed partnership agreement and share staff coaches for licensing courses? This is very frustrating and confusing for a lot of coaches. I assumed there would not be a renewed partnership, after I heard the announcement about licensing. Thank you for your insight and commitment to make all of us better coaches! In Soccer, Kyle
06 April 2015 at 3:16 PM
 

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