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Coaches Blog

Sam's Blog is a bi-weekly addition to the US Youth Soccer Blog. Sam Snow is the Coaching Director for US Youth Soccer.

 

Get In The Game

Sam Snow

For several years US Youth Soccer has had advertisements for TV and other mediums called "Get Out and Get in the Game". The idea was to promote young people to get outside play soccer and interact with their friends. I have the same idea in mind for coaches. No, I don't mean coaches going to play soccer; although that would be a good thing. I mean for coaches getting involved in the political game.

Now before you panic coaches, I'm not saying you should run for an elected position; although that's not a bad idea either. What I mean is for coaches to get involved in the decision making process for policies and by-laws. The thought of coaches getting themselves involved with the decision makers comes to my mind since this weekend is the Annual General Meeting (AGM) of US Youth Soccer. The AGM is held in conjunction with the Finals of the National Championships Series (NCS). Both the NCS Finals and the AGM are took place in Phoenix last week. Check out the US Youth Soccer web site for great video clips and stories on the Finals.

As to the AGM and coaches involving themselves in the decision making process, I have always advocated that coaches do so. I hear too many coaches complain about the decisions made at the AGM of their club or state association, but they never made any effort to participate. When I was the Technical Director for Louisiana Soccer I encouraged the club directors of coaching to attend the state AGM and speak up on issues that impacted the playing environment. A few of the club coaches took up the challenge and voiced their thoughts at the meetings. Even though they did not have a vote, usually the club president had that right, having coaches there and speaking on the proposals helped to sway the decisions being made.

It is that kind of involvement as a leader in a club or a state association in which coaches should participate. Do not become a politician. Let the administrators make the business decisions that are necessary to operate clubs, leagues and associations. Do, however, get involved in the decision being made that impacts players and coaches. If you do not get in the game then you have no right to complain about the outcome. Some coaches say that soccer decisions are being made by non-soccer people. Well where are you? If you want decisions made by "soccer people" then get yourself to those meetings. So come on coaches, Get Out and Get in the Game!
 

Appropriate Field

Sam Snow

Last week the U.S. Soccer Developmental Academy held a tournament at Pizza Hut Park, which is the location of the US Youth Soccer national office. I was able that week to watch some great matches. I was also able to share a meeting with Claudio Reyna, Youth Technical Director; Tony Lepore, Director of Youth National Team Scouting; and Asher Mendelsohn, Director of Referees, Coaching Administration and Development Academy Programs.

We had good discussions on coaching education and aspects of player development in the USA. One facet of player development on which we all agree is that players twelve years old and younger should play small-sided games. But what must be further addressed is that often the field on which these small-sided games are played are too large for the age group. There's little point to the match if the field is so large that the players must play kick-n-run simply to cover the yardage. When the field is too big then quality soccer only makes a rare appearance.

For real soccer to happen in a small-sided game for players in the Under-6, U-8, U-10 and U-12 age groups then the field must be of the appropriate dimensions. The right size field makes it possible for players to dribble, pass and shoot in realistic situations on realistic parts of the field. As they get into the U-12 age group then the tactical possibilities in the game grow for the players when on the right size field.

So the right environment for preteen players must be a smaller field with an adjusted size goal and smaller ball. The length of play must be shorter and the number of players on the field must be less than eleven-a-side. Here are the national recommendations for the proper size ball and field by age group.

Age Appropriate Ball Sizes
Age group
Ball size
Circumference
Weight
U-6 and U-8
3
23-24 inches
11-12 ounces
U-10 and U-12
4
25-26 inches
12-13 ounces
U-14 to U-18+
5
27-28 inches
14-16 ounces

 
US Youth Soccer Recommended Field Dimensions
Age Group
Length x Width (yards)
U-6
25 x 20
U-8
35 x 25
U-10
55 x 40
U-12
80 x 55
U-14
100 x 65
U-16
110 x 70
U-18+
120 x 75
 
 

Taking a knee

Sam Snow

This week's question concerns the irregular habit of all of the players on the field of play taking a knee when another player goes down with an injury.

Hey guys, I'm currently coaching a girls U8 travel team. I've played soccer as a kid, played in college, managed a junior college men's team as well as trained club teams in the New York Hudson Valley area. Currently a concern for my team is understanding that taking a knee for an injured player is not required but a courtesy. Personally I don't agree with taking a knee and would rather group the players together, reiterate where they are in the game and clap for the player. The players also get tight and are more likely to cramp. I'm not sure I never did it and don't think it's disrespectful not to take a knee.

The action to take knee when a player is injured is not required in the Laws of the Game. However, it has become a bit of a local habit in some youth soccer circles (a spillover from gridiron football). The better procedure would be that if the referee has stopped the match for an injury to have the rest of the players to go to the touchline in front of their team bench, but do not leave the field of play, and get a drink of water. If the coach is not involved with the care of the injured player, then he or she may have a BRIEF word with the players (during this moment in the game the coach must remain in the technical area). But a coach must be very careful here to not get across more than one point. Too many coaches talk too much. It is more effective with children to be concise. Of course, if the injured player needs to come off the field, then the other players should recognize her or him with applause. This form of fair play should be expected of your players whether the injured player is from your team or the opposing team.

The action of recognizing with applause the injured player if she or he must come off is a stronger public showing of being good sports than taking a knee. Hopefully, the players are taught that they do not need to stop automatically if a player is injured. The game plays on unless the referee calls for an injury time out. Having said that, it is also incumbent on the coach to teach players that if a player is badly injured and the referee has not seen the player on the ground and has not stopped play then the players should play the ball out over the touchline.

The team in possession of the ball should put the ball out of bounds. The referee can then let on the medical staff to care for the injured player. Once play is resumed with a throw-in for U-10 and older teams or a pass-in for U-6 and U-8 teams, the team awarded the restart should give the ball back to the opponents if they were the team who played the ball out to care for an opposing injured player. If the team who played the ball out of bounds did so for their own injured player then the team taking the throw-in or pass-in may keep possession, but should put the ball back into play by sending it back toward their defensive third. Fair play then resumes from there.

Of course THE most respectful recognition of the injured player is not applause or taking a knee but a personal kind word from one player to another.
 

Team Captain

Sam Snow

Not long ago I was asked about the process of selecting a team captain in youth soccer. The question and comments were this:
 
I have been coaching youth soccer since I was in college back in 1983. I have taken the National Youth Soccer Course, have various other certifications and regularly attend coaching clinics. I have coached several Travel Teams and recreational teams from ages ranging from U6 to U18. I also coached an adult Women's recreation team for six years until two years ago when I stopped coaching. Nevertheless, I am still my town's youth soccer club's vice president. I currently manage my 14 year-old daughter's Travel Team, but I am not the coach. I have a son who plays high school soccer and a younger daughter who plays both U11 Travel and Premiere soccer.
 
In my twenty-seven years of coaching, I have never appointed or had elections for team captains. Instead I have always used a game captain approach beginning around the U11 age group to reward improved play and to give all the children a taste of being a game captain during the season. While I have researched and I understand the utility and benefits of having team Captains at the high school level and above, I firmly believe that it is inappropriate in youth soccer. Recently, my daughter's U11 Travel Coach held elections and appointed two team captains based upon this vote. Her Premier Team does not have Team Captains, but uses a similar game captain approach that I use.
 
All of the parents of the children on the team were very surprised that the coach did this. Indeed, they are all looking to me for direction based on my experience and as the club's vice president on whether to approach the coach about our collective disagreement with the use of Team Captains. I have always also believed that other than when asked by the coach that I do not interfere with a coach's decision unless in my role as a board member to enforce disciplinary action. I am very interested in US Youth Soccer's views on the use of team captains in youth soccer and whether you can direct me to some articles on the subject.
 
US Youth Soccer does not have an official policy on identifying or selecting the team captain or captains. We feel the decision is up to the club to make. If the club does not have a policy in place for the various age groups in the club on the function and selection of captains then the club director of coaching should devise one. From the US Youth Soccer Coaching Department we recommend giving all of the players the opportunity to be the captain at least once per season not just in matches but in training sessions too. That should take place with the U8 to the U14 age groups. The U6 age group does not need team captains in any manner. The U16 and older age groups should have captains voted upon by the players and accredited by the coaching staff. I like these suggestions from Eric McGrath.
 
How to Pick Captains for a Soccer Team
By Eric McGrath, eHow Contributor
 
When looking to create a good team bond from a disparate group of soccer players, it is a good idea for the coach to select good captains in order to maintain discipline in the group, to relay tactical developments during a game, and to keep movement from exercise to exercise as efficient as possible. This article looks at some ideas on selecting the right personnel for this important role in any soccer team.
 
Look within the group for natural leaders. Sometimes these players will lead quietly by example with their behavior and level of play; other times they will be strong vocal personalities. Either way, these personality types will be the most obvious choice for a captaincy.
 
Decide whether the team will have one captain or many captains…
 
Decide whether the captains, if more than one, will be co-captains or a head-captain and a vice-captain. Again, the larger the squad, the more sensible it is to delegate leadership to more than one person. Conversely, for a smaller squad, it probably makes sense to have two co-captains or one head captain and a vice-captain.
 
Observe all possible candidates for captain's roles, and judge them on their presence in the team, the reaction of their teammates towards them, and the methods they use to exert their natural authority on their teammates.
 
Once a decision has been reached, announce the captains at an opportune time when every player is present. Explain the reasons why the specific player or players were chosen, and make sure everyone on the team supports the decision.