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Coaches Blog

Sam's Blog is a bi-weekly addition to the US Youth Soccer Blog. Sam Snow is the Coaching Director for US Youth Soccer.

 

Risk Management

Sam Snow

A stance from the State Associations Technical Directors on background checks for coaches:
 
Risk management No. 7
We believe all coaches involved in youth soccer should be subject to background checks and that coaching licenses be required as part of the risk management process.  We also believe that each coach should be issued a registration card, certifying that they have completed the risk management process and have attained the required coaching certification.
 

Facilities for Development

Sam Snow

Here is another excerpt from the soon to be released Player Development Model from US Youth Soccer.
 
If You Build It They Will Come         
Throughout the United States a great deal of effort and time is being put into the education and development of coaches like you. You are diligently improving so that you can better develop players. The goal of any good coach is to develop players to their full potential and to help them rise in the game as far as their talents will allow. Raising the professional standards of your coaching is laudable. Yet it can be frustrating for you. You acquire knowledge and learn of proper training techniques, but are then frustrated by the lack of facilities to use these new abilities. Too many teams must train on the outfield of a baseball diamond or on one half of a soccer field or on any open patch of ground they can find. Sometimes there are no goals, corner flags or any proper training equipment. Usually if there are goals they are fixed permanently in the ground, so the turf in front of the goal is worn away. Consequently the players reach a certain level of play and then stagnate there. The best coaches in the world cannot fully develop players without the right training environment.
 
Across the nation outstanding soccer complexes are being built for matches; in most cases though the fields are used only on match day. So where do the players train? A simple observation of most club teams will show that the coaches and players spend one to three days per week training and one day per week in a match on the average. If the time spent training is triple that of playing, why isn't more emphasis put on the development of training grounds?
 
You have gained knowledge on how to train players at coaching courses, clinics, workshops, symposia, etc. You must then be given the tools to apply that knowledge. In your club the administrators and coaches can all work together to help develop the best facilities. The role of soccer administrators here is to raise the funds to provide the tools. Through this teamwork administrators and coaches jointly can produce quality players. When a new soccer complex is built consideration must be given to providing grounds for the players to develop into those skillful, intelligent players who are entertaining to watch on match day. Building fields for only matches doesn't meet the needs of the soccer community – land at the complex must be set aside on which to construct a training ground. Devote and develop field space just for training sessions; the space allocated depends upon the number of teams in the club. Certainly the larger the better, but any space set aside specifically for training is a step in the right direction.
 
Consider too the need for covered or indoor facilities during inclement weather. If you live in an area with ice and snow or high heat {90°+} for long periods then the training phase in your seasonal plan is interrupted. As a club construct a facility or make lease or rent arrangements with a suitable facility to be productive during these periods of the year. With access to an appropriate facility games and training can continue with Futsal, indoor soccer or with a field house you could play 3-a-side on up to 11-a-side soccer.
 
The construction of a soccer complex is typically done in phases over many years. The training ground must be a part of these phases of construction, particularly during its initial phase. While a fair amount of land will be needed to construct a high quality training ground the benefits will be long lasting. Those who are sincere about making decisions in soccer while placing the players first will start immediate construction of training grounds. Quality coaching and facilities will contribute positively to player development. Since player development is the backbone of the game the construction of training grounds is mandatory! National, regional and state associations along with local clubs must work together toward this goal. This aspect of soccer's growth can no longer be neglected!
US Youth Soccer Recommended Field Dimensions
Age Group
Length x Width
U6
25 x 20
U8
35 x 25
U10
55 x 40
U12
80 x 50
U14
100 x 65
U16
110 x 70
U18
115 x 70
U20
120 x 75
Table 5 Field Dimensions
 
The dimensions of the playing field have a real impact on the players' ability to perform in a skillful and intelligent way. Playing on an age appropriate size field allows for soccer to be played as opposed to kick ball which occurs on inappropriate sized fields. If clubs build full sized plots – 130 x 100 – then any size field or fields from the table above can be marked off.
 
Here are some of the "tools" needed at a first rate soccer training ground.
  • Sand field and/or pit
  • Kicking board or rebound goal and portable free kick wall
  • Flat faced goals and portable goals of various sizes {be sure they are properly anchored}
  • Cones and training bibs of various sizes, colors and shapes for the cones
  • Corner flags, coaching poles, yellow rope, pendulum pole and hurdles
  • Balls of various sizes and colors and medicine balls
  • Tennis and volleyball nets and standards
  • Video camera scaffolding
  • Grids (10 x 15) marked off on part of the training ground
  • Storage
 

No. 6 Coaching Licenses

Sam Snow

We believe that competitive level coaches should hold a minimum of a "D" License.  Recreation level coaches should hold a minimum of an "E" certificate, if they are coaching teenage players and an age appropriate Youth Module certificate if they are coaching children.  Coaches working at the top level (premier/classic) should hold a "C" License or National Diploma.  Ideally they should hold a "B" License and/or an Advanced National Diploma.

The overall intent here is to create minimum license requirements in the U.S.A. and to establish levels of license with commensurate levels of play.  We recommend that this implementation be completed by December 31, 2010.

The rationale for these requirements follows:
- To provide continuing education on the game in the United States of America.
- To ensure that American coaches have an equal opportunity for education and standards in the game as our domestic and foreign counterparts.  Many countries now require mandatory licensing.
- To create the appropriate training environment to minimize the risk of injury.  To provide information on the prevention and care of injury.
- To reduce the risk claims against negligence and to be accountable for background screening.
- To equal other sports such as softball and ice hockey who have established mandatory coaching education requirement policies.  Ice hockey's rationale is very similar to that of
U. S. Soccer. 

"The coaching education program of USA Hockey is committed to developing coaches through a comprehensive education program at all levels.  Since quality coaching is the single most important element affecting the athletes and the sport itself, the experience athletes' gain through participation will be a direct result of the coach's qualifications, education and competencies.  Therefore, it is paramount that we prepare our coaches through a comprehensive curriculum which follows the different levels of skill progressions for the development of players."
 

Players Train Player

Sam Snow

In our youth soccer environment the training sessions tend to fairly sterile in that the U7 team only practices with the U7 age group, girls only practice with girls and so forth. We have evolved into a situation where there's little interaction between age groups and sometimes gender too. By allowing this to continue we devolve our clubs into mere associations of loosely connected teams without allegiance to the club. We also miss out on opportunities for the players to help one another grow in the game. For example in soccer times past we had pick-up games with mixed ages and occasionally mixed gender. Now-a-days far too much of our training environment is isolated by age group and gender. We are missing out on the chance for older players to help the younger players learn a bit more about playing the game. Not all teaching of the game comes from coaches nor should it. Players should also learn from watching college, professional and USA national team matches. They can also learn from the players in their own soccer club at practices. The coaching leaders in a club should organize times for older teams to practice with a younger team. The U9 and U10 teams combine in a training session one day for example. The U14 boys team has a practice game versus the U17 girls team as another example. From this environment within the club the players help each other grow in the game, they get to know one another better and a feeling of club unity expands. They may also begin to support each other's matches. If the older players come and cheer now and then for the younger players at one of the matches the impact on self-esteem, confidence and club loyalty will be profound. When the younger players go to watch a match of an older team in the club the crowd atmosphere improves and the younger players are exposed intimately to a higher level of play. The older players could attend younger team training sessions to play alongside of them or help coach them or just to be the example of how to do certain ball skills. The possibilities are many if we take advantage of clubs with a full range of age groups developing players from within. So in a club these are the older age groups to come and help with the younger age group with training and to cheer at their games. The U12 age group works with the U6 age group. The U14 age group works with the U8 age group. The U16 age group works with the U10 age group. The U19 age group works with the U12 age group. The adult teams work with the U14, U16 and U19 age groups. Indeed players 16-years-old and older should be encouraged to play on both a youth team and an adult team.