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Coaches Blog

Sam's Blog is a bi-weekly addition to the US Youth Soccer Blog. Sam Snow is the Coaching Director for US Youth Soccer.

 

Giving Coaches the Best Coaching Materials

Sam Snow

One aspect that separates US Youth Soccer from other soccer organizations is the research based information we use in our education of coaches, administrators and parents. This is reflected in the National Youth License curriculum, the content of The Novice Coach DVD Series, the new Skills School DVD and Technical Manual, as well as, the online postings on USYouthSoccer.org.

At the annual US Youth Soccer adidas Workshop and Awards Gala, the presenters are often leaders in their field. We try to expose our members to the latest and sometimes quite innovative methods in our soccer world. One of those presentations, two years ago in St. Louis, was made by Angel Planells. Coach Planells holds a Master's Degree in Nutrition as well as being an active youth coach in Manhattan. With the help of US Youth Soccer, he completed a survey of hundreds of youth soccer players, parents of players and coaches on their sport nutrition habits. Angel then made a presentation on his findings at the 2007 Workshop. A copy of his research paper was distributed to state and club coaches across the country.

In the same vein, recent research was done by Kristen Jones on the stresses involved in coaching. Much of the research was based on a through survey done with US Youth Soccer coaches across the nation. The complete dissertation was sent to the coaches who have singed into the US Youth Soccer Coaches database, on USYouthSoccer.org. These coaches are our first point of contact when research projects such as the two mentioned are undertaken. They too are the first members of US Youth Soccer to receive copies of the completed papers. If you have not entered yourself into the database and would like to do so, here are the details and link to sign up.

We are looking to build a national directory of US Youth Soccer club coaches. 

GOAL: build accurate contacts at the coach level to further the communication of programs, benefits and educational opportunities offered by US Youth Soccer to those who impact the game daily.

The purpose of the national coaching database is to further the communication efforts of US Youth Soccer to those who impact and influence youth soccer on a daily basis, specifically at the grassroots level.  This database would receive coaching information as deemed necessary and have the option of receiving US Youth Soccer's Kwik Kicks eNewsletter to further the efforts of the organization's membership benefits.

The US Youth Soccer National Coaching Database is live, to submit your information please click the link below.

/coaches/NationalCoachDatabaseForm/

This information is not intended to be sold to any third party.  The privacy policy can be found in its entirety by clicking the link below. 

US Youth Soccer Privacy Policy:

Please pass this message along to coaches in the soccer clubs in your area.  Thank you for your contribution in our effort to improve our communication and service to America's youth soccer coaches.
 

TOPSoccer Coaching Course

Sam Snow

This past weekend I attended the US Youth Soccer Region IV TOPSoccer symposium. Over 80 people from around the region attend the event from administrators, coaches and referees involved with US Youth Soccer TOPSoccer. The presentations made included How to Start a Program, Hosting Your Initial Event, Safety and Risk Management, Roundtable on the Field Sessions, Coaching Tips, Training Activities, Integrating the Players and TOPSoccer parent. The main focus this weekend though was the new course, Coaching TOPSoccer. This is a new four hour coaching course that will be offered by the US Youth Soccer state associations. The course was delivered by Rick Flores and me.

This was the final pilot course after the first one being delivered in Pittsburgh at the 2008 US Youth Soccer adidas Workshop & Coaches Convention by Brett Thompson and Rick Flores. The course involves classroom and field sessions. The section topics in the course are Why Do People Play Soccer, Player Challenges, Qualities of Coaches, Prevention & Care of Injuries/Risk Management, as well as, Communication and Ideas for Coaching. The practical field session takes the course candidates through training activities that are suitable for players with Down syndrome, Autism, ADHD and Cerebral Palsy. Coaches who complete the course will earn a US Youth Soccer certificate issued by the state association.

The symposium attendees completed the course in the Saturday morning sessions. They were issued the inaugural certificates at the beginning of the afternoon session. We then went to the Starfire indoor fields where TOPSoccer players from the local TUSK soccer club joined us. Rick Flores took the kids through a very good one hour session. He used the symposium attendees as the soccer buddies to assist the players as necessary in the training activities and the match. This 'hands on' opportunity was a great learning experience for many of the coaches and administrators. After training we all joined the players for a pizza party.

The following day of the symposium we attended four classroom presentations before our departure. The symposium was quite well done with a range of topics for parents, coaches and administrators. The next TOPSoccer symposium will be hosted by the Ohio South Youth Soccer Association and US Youth Soccer Region II in Cincinnati on August 1st to the 2nd. Plans are underway for similar symposia in US Youth Soccer Regions I and III.

The US Youth Soccer TOPSoccer program has room for dramatic growth. According to the U.S. Census Bureau 51 million Americans have some sort of disability. Four million of those citizens are children age four to sixteen. Our clubs and state associations have just begun to bring soccer to this segment of our population. As these youngsters are afforded the chance to play the world's game we will 'walk the talk' as The Game for ALL Kids!
 

International Travel

Sam Snow

Elite players in soccer have an opportunity that participants in other sports do not have to the same extent, travel. Given the truly global nature of soccer with 202 countries as members of FIFA an American soccer team could literally go anywhere in the world and have a match. Players and staff must be flexible and adaptable to both on the field situations and away from the pitch. Some young elite players have their international careers derailed by their inability to manage the off the field aspects of foreign travel. Here are a few of the adjustments the 1994 and 1993 boys' teams in the US Youth Soccer Olympic Development Program had to make while competing in Italy last week.

Using locker rooms and showers at the match venue was a new experience for many of the kids. Very few, if any, youth soccer complexes in the USA have locker rooms or showers. Our youth soccer players are in the habit of changing into their game uniform at home or the hotel, then ride back dirty after the match. Using the locker room and changing, as well as showering, in front of teammates were new experiences for all of these players. While it took some prodding and they were reluctant they did adapt to this new aspect of European soccer customs. Good preparation perhaps for high school, college and professional soccer where locker rooms are the norm.

They also learned that at game time, the subs put on training bibs and go to the bench first. The starting eleven line up, first the captain then the goalkeeper, defenders, midfielders and forwards, with the other team and march to center field to line up on either side of the officials to then wave to the crowd and be acknowledged. From here they go directly to their positions on the field to kick-off the match. They do not return to the bench, so this means that warm-ups or water bottles or other personal items must be taken to the bench by the reserve players and staff. This also means that the coaches must have their act together and get across to the players everything they need to in the locker room before exiting for the pitch.

The players also had to adjust to a Mediterranean diet and being 14-years-old this was a major adjustment for some. A few of the kids were unable to adapt and their intake of a balanced diet suffered. This of course caught up with them on the field for the energy to play at a high pace for a full match. Begging for french fries was an indicator to the staff that the players need more guidance on an athlete's diet back home. They did adapt to the time zone and a change in their sleep routine. This was merely adjusting to a five hour change in time zones which they did after the first two days.

A great aspect of foreign travel for our soccer players is the chance to experience a different culture; to broaden their horizons both in soccer and life experiences. Of course a piece of that experience is languages other than English. Players and staff should learn some of the language for the country they will visit before going. One interesting aspect of the language experience is not speaking the same language as the referee. Of course tone of voice and body language still come across if you are cutting loose on the referee. It may seem a small thing but not the being able to understand the language of the referee means the players really do need to understand the universal signals used by referees for the calls made during a match. This is another consideration for the coaches of elite players to teach to their teams.

Well, these are just a few examples of the versatility needed by select players and their staff. However, there are more to consider such as, altitude, weather and field conditions. The point for coaches here is to know that you must teach the players proper off the field habits that will impact their match performance. The more versatile the players and staff the more positive will be the experience of international soccer travel.
 

Fair Play

Sam Snow

Yesterday I was in Milan, Italy at the San Siro stadium. I watched Inter Milan play against Palermo. Inter won the match 2-1 in front of 40,000 spectators. Those watching included the 1993 and 1994 US Youth Soccer Olympic Development Program Region I boys' teams and staff. The match was skillful, quite tactical and in the second half it was played at a fast and entertaining pace. Three distinct times during the match the teams displayed an unwritten rule of the game. It is a rule which more of our coaches should teach their players.
 
When a hard injury occurs and it is seen by the players that the injured player or players will not get up then the team with the ball intentionally kicks the ball out over the touchline. Once the ball is out of play then the referee may allow onto the field the first aid staff. They may now attend to the injured player or players. When the match resumes the team taking the throw-in throws the ball back to the other team's defensive third and they do not challenge the ball until the other team has the ball under control. So team A has kicked the ball into touch so that aid can be given to an injury. In a return act of Fair Play team B puts the ball back into play with a throw-in and gives the ball back to team A. Fair Play – be a good sport! This act occurred in a Serie A match where big money is on the line. Inter Milan played the ball out and Palermo gave it back. This was one instance of Fair Play.
 
In the other two cases players had horrific collisions with both players collapsing to the ground and then no movement at all. The referee immediately stopped the match and called on the first aid personnel. When hurt players don't move it's a real red flag; sometimes writhing is a good sign. When play resumed with a drop ball the team that didn't have possession of the ball at the time the match was stopped stood passively at the drop ball and let the opponent kick the ball to a teammate; an act of Fair Play by team A. Mind you too that team B kicked the drop ball back toward their end of the field to a supporting teammate. This act occurred in the Palermo and Inter match.
 
During the same match a second serious collision occurred with again the referee instantly halting play. This time at the drop ball the opponent didn't even stand near the drop ball and allowed the team who had been in possession to play the drop ball completely uncontested. In this last case it was Palermo in possession and they played the drop ball back to a supporting teammate; an impressive bit of sportsmanship for a team that was losing 2-1 at the time.
 
Now if professional teams in one of the best leagues in the world where millions of dollars are at stake can display Fair Play why not our youth teams? So whose job is it to instill Fair Play into our youngsters? First and foremost it's a responsibility of the parents. Then of course the coaches must teach and demonstrate sporting ethics. Once the adults set the right example then it is up to the players to live up to the standard.