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Parents Blog

Susan Boyd blogs on USYouthSoccer.org every Monday.  A dedicated mother and wife, Susan offers a truly unique perspective into the world of a "Soccer Mom". 

 

Another road trip

Susan Boyd

I'm excited. I get to attend the US Youth Soccer Regional Championship for Region II because Robbie's team won State Cup. I love Regionals. There's pageantry and an expectation that fills the event with energy. I love going to different states to see different soccer fields. It's like having the office over for dinner. You get out the good china, you polish the silver, you clean the house, you buy flowers, and you put on your best outfits. I'm so happy to be on the guest list!

Getting to the championships means working through several rounds of competition. Emerging victorious puts teams in an elite group that only grows more elite the farther up you go. Any young soccer player who aspires to higher levels of soccer will want to play in his or her State Championship and hopefully in Regional and National Championships. Many of the best American players have had the thrill of playing in and even winning these events. It starts with working hard at practice, developing individual and team talent throughout the year, being dedicated to fitness (Robbie hated running 7 miles a day with his team but it paid off), and making some sacrifices along the way. But the result is a week of great competition, fun, and networking. Some of Robbie's and Bryce's soccer friends are kids they met at these events. Players can't help but be impressed by the talent they face and the elevated level of competition required of them.

By the time you read this Region III will be ready to enter its quarterfinals in Baton Rouge, but Region IV will just be getting the first games of the round robin started in Albuquerque, N.M., Region II will kick off on Saturday in Beavercreek, Ohio (a suburb of Dayton), and Region I will begin July 2in Barboursville, W.Va., home to Marshall University. If the event is nearby your hometown, then by all means take a day to see what your Region has to offer and what your own players can aspire to achieve. Schedules are on the various regional websites which can be accessed from http://championships.usyouthsoccer.org/2010_Play_Dates_Regional_and_National_Competitions.asp?. The events will cost you no more than a parking permit and you can then share in all the activities, booths, and viewing the competitions that Regionals offer.

I did check that my hotel has ESPN and ESPN2 so I will miss as little as possible of the World Cup action. But I have to admit that attending the Region II Championship to watch my son and his team play serves as a significant reason to miss a World Cup game!! While each age bracket begins with around 12 to 16 teams, only one will advance to the National Championships. So every game provides the heart-pounding repercussions that a World Cup team faces, only with your own children facing them. The oohs and ahhs that accompany every shot, every save, every pass, and every foul have far more electricity than your same investment in a World Cup game. Thank goodness it's only one game a day, unless you have two or more kids on different teams. There were two years where both boys competed, and I think I owe my grey hair to the stress of two games a day for those three days each year.

I'll have a few more blogs this next week because I'll be at the Region II Championships, and I hope to pass on a bit of the flavor of the event. We'll be driving 400 miles to Dayton, which in and of itself could be a saga since we will be carpooling a number of boys and then I am half of the official chaperones. There will be hotels, trips to and from the fields, discovering things to do for 18 restless boys, and reconnecting with my old haunts in the Dayton area. I am an Ohio girl although I only lived there the first five years of my life. But nearly every relative on my father's side and a fair number on my mother's side filled out a significant percentage of the Ohio census forms. I used to say that you couldn't name a town in Ohio that didn't have one of my relatives living in it. That's less true now as I've gotten older, but I have relatives in some pretty out of the way hamlets as well as the cities. So I'm ready for another road trip. Bring it on!