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Parents Blog

Susan Boyd blogs on USYouthSoccer.org every Monday.  A dedicated mother and wife, Susan offers a truly unique perspective into the world of a "Soccer Mom". 

 

Protective Custody

Susan Boyd

I make my living as a writer which probably doesn't seem like a real vocation. I began graduate school in computer science which would have been a much wiser financial choice. Everyone I was in school with has now retired from Microsoft and owns soccer teams. I still write for my dinner and wash soccer uniforms.   My relationship with computers now revolves around my seriously significant dependence upon my laptop. It is the repository of all my writing, finances, addresses, calendar, and solitaire games. Losing my laptop would be worse than losing my brain. So although I rarely invest in those protection plans that push up the profit margins of Best Buy and cover everything from big screen TVs to tweezers, I bought one for my laptop.
               
This policy was amazing. I could blow torch my laptop, drop it from the Leaning Tower, roll over it with my car, or allow my dog to eat it. In every case it would be repaired or replaced.   I had an amazing sense of security knowing that no matter how clumsy I might be I would still be able to insure I had my laptop. My Scottish father would have told me just to be careful and save the money. After all he didn't just pinch pennies; he photographed them and kept the negatives in his safe deposit box. Maybe I had a premonition having bought the laptop in Tampa during a soccer tournament. I threw traditional financial caution to the winds and signed on the dotted line.
               
I also further secured the safety of my precious computer by instituting the "no one touches this thing but me" policy with the iron clad rider of  "absolutely no soccer balls in the house." My laptop ended up on Robbie's bed because he "borrowed" it to watch DVDs. It provided the perfect back stop for the size 5 soccer ball Bryce bicycle kicked down the hallway into Robbie's bedroom. In an instant the screen turned into smithereens as the LCD fairies released their Technicolor pixels into cyber space and the boys rapidly began pointing fingers.
               
The Best Buy help desk had a good laugh at my expense, but took my disabled laptop and promised to have it back good as new in two weeks. Those weeks gave me time to think, a dangerous proposition since I seem to have no governor on my ruminations. I got to thinking about how wonderful this protection policy was. For a certain fee, probably way overpriced, I could assure that no matter how awful my calamity and damage, I could once again have perfection. Not too many things in life are so reassuring. With two boys in soccer I immediately thought about all the times I've watched them writhing on the ground or seen their friends limping off the field where no guarantees of full recovery are offered.   We can't buy any sort of policy which offers the promise of full protection for our children. We can only do our best to insure a modicum of safety for them by providing guidance in wise behaviors and by providing equipment which helps diminish injury.
               
Every time we insist on a helmet, buckling a seat belt, wearing a mouth guard, slipping on elbow or knee pads, buying proper sized shin guards, and teaching responsibilities we're buying a small insurance policy on their future. We can't wrap them in bubble wrap and lock them in a room because children need to develop independence, exercise their bodies, and give flight to their imaginations. We accept a certain amount of risk. That's not always easy because it also means giving up some control. When Robbie is tackled from behind and crashes to the ground, I have moments of complete panic until he gets up. I know injury is a very real possibility, so all I can do is hope that the coaches, referees, and players keep things under control to reduce injuries.
               
We can also help our children stay safely mobile by insisting on definite limits when they go down. Any head trauma, no matter how slight at first blush, should be treated seriously. Small hemorrhages can appear in the brain taking up to several hours to show any danger. Anyone getting a significant bump, even if he or she is lucid, should not return to play and should be monitored for 24 hours. Twists, turns, and knocks on any other body part where there is definite pain to the player and where limbs strain when supporting weight mean the player needs to sit out for 10 or 15 minutes to watch for swelling, discoloration, or increased pain. Cuts or tears can be patched up to stem the bleeding, but immediately following the practice or game should be seen by a doctor to assess if stitches will be needed.
               
I definitely encourage teams to elect one parent to be the medical safety officer for the team. This person should always have a good first aid kit available at all games and practices, plus it would be a great idea if they could become CPR certified. The Red Cross website www.redcrossstore.org or the OSHA website www.osha-safety-training.net/FA/firstaid.html provide guidelines and order forms for various first aid kits. The Red Cross and YMCA offer CPR courses for the public. Teams should always have ice and plastic bags available to make ice packs for any injuries. 
               
Children come under our protective custody, but no protection is perfect. Sometimes catastrophic injuries occur. In those cases we have to accept that we can't protect our children from everything and not bury ourselves in guilt. Sports provide children with exercise, life lessons, and joy. Those gifts come with some peril but not enough to justify keeping kids out of sports. Good judgment offers enough protection, that while not perfect, comes close enough to give us some ease. I also just got new laptop last week on which the hard drive crashed after three days. The protection policy got me a new laptop immediately, but didn't get me back the two articles I had just written. So I guess there is no perfect protection out there even for laptops or tweezers.