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Parents Blog

Susan Boyd blogs on USYouthSoccer.org every Monday.  A dedicated mother and wife, Susan offers a truly unique perspective into the world of a "Soccer Mom". 

 

Watch the game

Susan Boyd

Professional soccer hits its stride in the spring. Feb. 28 was the Carling Cup won by Manchester United. May 15 was the FA Cup won by Chelsea. May 22 is the UEFA Cup played between Inter Milan and Bayern Munich – which will be decided before you read this blog but after I wrote it! And on June 12 the World Cup begins in South Africa. While the majority of youth players won't have the privilege of playing in any of these events and most won't even have a chance to see one of these matches live, youth players and their families should still make these and other professional games part of their TV viewing schedule.

I'm supposing many in America will watch the U.S. team play their three group games in the World Cup which kicks off against England June 12 at 2:30 p.m. (ET) on ABC.   The England team may be strong enough to win the Cup, so that game in particular should hold some exciting possibilities for American fans. The U.S. doesn't need to beat England to advance, although they do need to beat the other two in their group. But beating England would certainly up the stock for respect by the soccer community. The U.S. is ranked 14th in the world while England is ranked 8th, so there's a chance for an upset. Despite loyalty and expectations, watching the World Cup shouldn't be limited to the U.S. matches.

Many of the world's greatest players return to their home countries to compete in the World Cup. Didier Drogba, the stand-out player on Chelsea, plays for the Ivory Coast. You might not consider looking for the Ivory Coast games in the World Cup schedule, but that team will provide some of the best soccer you'll see. Overshadowed by the Cameroon and Nigerian teams they have fought their way up to a respectable 4th place in the African continental rankings with some strong victories in the months leading up to the World Cup, including a 3-1 win over Ghana. Other players of note should encourage us to watch more than just the U.S.: Samuel Eto'o from Cameroon a member of the UEFA finalist Inter Milan, Mark Schwarzer from Australia a member of Fulham UEFA Cup runners-up, and Theofanis Gekas from Greece, a member of Eintracht Frankfurt and the top European World Cup qualifier goal scorer.

Youth players and their parents should make it a regular habit to watch as many professional games as possible. Developing that keen eye and inherent understanding of the sport through consistent exposure to the highest level of play remains an essential component to both succeeding at and loving the game. Parents can benefit through a clearer understanding of the rules and how far rough play can go before referees make a call. Watching replays of fouls, goals, questionable play, outstanding play, and set plays helps both youth players and parents appreciate the nuances and requirements of the game. Most of us didn't play the sports we watch but we understand them because we watch them so often. 

When families watch professional soccer games on a regular basis it helps establish the legitimacy of and respect for the sport. If we send the message that soccer isn't worth watching then we also send the message that it isn't worth playing. Kids need to know that their choices are considered significant and valuable. Sitting down and enjoying a game together gives that support unambiguously to the player. In addition there's that aspect of bonding over a game that I've always thought justifies the hours of soccer viewing that goes on in my household.  Maybe I'm just rationalizing so I don't have to feel so badly that the grass isn't getting mowed or the screens aren't being replaced. But I do believe for the really big games, those memories of sharing the moment with one another outweigh some of the chores.

Here are links to the TV schedules for upcoming soccer games. Take the time to click on them, print them off, and then decide which ones you'll watch as a family. I can guarantee not only some serious thrills, but also some excellent insights to this game the world loves.