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Parents Blog

Susan Boyd blogs on USYouthSoccer.org every Monday.  A dedicated mother and wife, Susan offers a truly unique perspective into the world of a "Soccer Mom". 

 

It's Never Too Late

Susan Boyd

I hate to be late. I go crazy when I'm late, which makes my family crazy. I admit I probably have an unhealthy addiction to time, but at least I let my window panes stay dirty and the dust bunnies peacefully multiply under the furniture. So I have a few good qualities.

But here we are with just two days left in National Youth Soccer Month, and I haven't even mentioned it. The website has had some good articles, games, profiles, and promotions for the month, but not one blog from me. I'm going to say that I planned this; that I wanted to create a bridge from National Youth Soccer Month into the rest of soccer playing months ahead. That's my story, and I'm sticking to it.

Soccer can be found in nearly every country of the world, even tiny Caribbean islands and South Pacific atolls. Celebrating September as National Youth Soccer Month barely scratches the surface of the widespread appeal of and attention to soccer. For most countries in the world, national pride is closely aligned with success or failure on the soccer pitch. While we should observe a month that focuses on all the benefits and enjoyment soccer provides, we should also use the month as a springboard to discovering and participating in the many ways soccer infuses our lives. After all, we spend most weekends watching our kids play, so we have already committed to a nearly year-round soccer attention.

There's a great book, "How Soccer Explains the World," by Franklin Foer, that offers an enticing theory that most of the world's social, economic, and political events can be connected to soccer. While some of the arguments require a suspension of basic geopolitical tenets, the book nevertheless tantalizes the reader with thought-provoking examples of the parallels between soccer and the development of the planet's history. However, since my life has been overtaken by soccer, I'd like to think I've astutely selected the main moving force of the world's advancement rather than just an obsession. That way, every time I attend a game I can claim lofty social and historical motives. Somewhere in the great circle of life, your child's Under-8 game is affecting social change: the proverbial fluttering wings of a butterfly affecting the climate.

Even without these elevated standards, soccer can positively affect lives. Soccer teaches parents and children alike to accept defeat with graciousness and to win with humility. Soccer provides an avenue to interact with our children lovingly and candidly. Soccer offers physical and mental benefits. Soccer crosses all cultural, social, and economic strata without regard to any of them as limiting factors. Soccer can be played by both genders, old and young, and players with physical challenges. Soccer doesn't require any equipment; players can manage with an open area and a cantaloupe if necessary. Soccer brings people together and it can separate them. As the t-shirt says: "Soccer is Life."

So despite National Youth Soccer Month approaching its final days, I'm hoping that the spirit which infused the celebration will continue throughout the year. Make it your goal (don't groan) every month to do something special as it relates to soccer. Try to catch a national team game, any age both men and women, either live or on TV. Go to your local college to see a game. Spend a few hours in the backyard practicing juggling with your player. Hold a soccer birthday party. Make it a point to congratulate every player on your child's team with a positive comment about his or her play. Donate time to TOPSoccer to help kids with physical challenges play the game. Collect your neighborhood's old soccer gear and give to a local charity or to the U.S. Soccer Federation Passback Program. Pick something each month to make soccer special. In that way you guarantee that soccer will influence the world, and more importantly will influence your life.