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Parents Blog

Susan Boyd blogs on USYouthSoccer.org every Monday.  A dedicated mother and wife, Susan offers a truly unique perspective into the world of a "Soccer Mom". 

 

Finder's Fee

Susan Boyd

Cam Newton is arguably the best college quarterback, even the best football player, this year. But he's been embroiled in ongoing questions into his eligibility stemming from accusations of pay for play negotiations with Mississippi State by his father. As Auburn climbed into the BCS No. 1 spot last Sunday, the school faced the possibility of having Newton declared ineligible and having their wins vacated. However on Tuesday the NCAA gave Newton provisional eligibility stating that it didn't appear that Newton knew anything about his father's attempt to get a six-figure bounty for delivering Newton to Mississippi State. 

For purposes of full disclosure I received my graduate degree from University of Oregon who was number one until Auburn took over last Sunday edging out my beloved Ducks by .002 points in the rankings. Nevertheless this discussion of Newton is not sour grapes on my part. Rather, I'm concerned about parents who feel entitled to a cash reward for doing their job. That's the real point. No matter how much we spend on our kids, it's our job to support their dreams both emotionally and financially. I'm not saying that our children are entitled to unlimited contributions from our family income. But when we can afford it, we should be underwriting our children's dreams to the best of our abilities. 

If Cam Newton's father Cecil felt he was owed something for his years of sacrifice, he's wrong. If I had to place a value on what I've spent on my four children it would exceed this week's Powerball jackpot. Seriously! There isn't a college around that could pay me enough to cover what I've spent. Even if one of my children was a superstar, I couldn't imagine risking their eligibility and everything he or she had worked for by seeking some remuneration for doing my job. As things stand now, I'd merely give some coaching staff a really good laugh if I asked for money to convince my child to play for their school. All we can hope for is our kids' thanks. Robbie once told me that when he makes it big he'll get me a Lincoln Navigator. I don't really want a Lincoln Navigator, but that was his way of saying thank you, so I said thank you back. I'll never see a Lincoln Navigator or even Lincoln Logs, but I have had the pleasure of watching my children play in their respective sports and the knowledge they each had an activity that kept them involved, healthy, and happy. I'm not owed anything more than that.

Many non-sport kids have parents supporting their aspirations. There's rarely any major payoff down the road for anyone, athletes or not. But the amount of attention and money sports generate for colleges, could give the parents of athletes some wrong-headed idea that they deserve to share in the pot. Good parents support their kids whether it be sports, music, forensics, or model building. Non-athletic pursuits can require as much or more financial support than those who play sports. And I suppose there are parents of super smart kids who push for bigger scholarships by playing one college against another. But that's not money directly in their pockets. That's not a reward for being the bearer of the fruit.

Whatever our kids achieve stems from their passion and their investment in themselves. We can facilitate, but we're not out there running the field or practicing the scales. We may get up at 3 a.m. to take our son or daughter to 5 a.m. hockey practice, but that doesn't merit a paycheck. When we're so involved it's difficult not to have our ego invested in our children's accomplishments because we feel those accomplishments somehow reflect on our parental abilities. To some extent it does reflect on our parenting because if we weren't supportive, if we didn't pay for lessons or team fees, if we didn't drive to practices our kids most likely couldn't achieve in their interests. But ultimately their success falls solely to their own investment in their talents. If they don't work hard, if they don't learn from their mistakes, if they don't give 100 percent, then it won't matter how much money we throw at the situation. 

Cecil Newton deserves to be in the parent hall of shame. No matter how talented and extraordinary Cam turned out, there's no development bonus for the parent. Cecil risked his son's ability to earn the highest accolades in football including the Heisman Trophy and a national championship because he saw an opportunity to cash in. He risked not only his son's future, but the future of every player on his son's team – kids who have talent, but may have just eked by to win a coveted spot on the football team. Those kids had parents who probably made as big, or bigger, a financial investment. But they chose to respect that their obligation comes without compensation. Since the NCAA investigation is still open, there remains a chance that this will be a house of cards that collapses on Cam, his Tiger teammates, and Auburn. I don't really care what happens to Cecil, but I do care about what happens to young dedicated athletes whose only sin was guilt by association. I can't imagine my boys working hard enough to have their team reach the number one rank in the United States only to lose it all because the parent of a teammate wanted to line his pockets.   But my kids would have to wait in line to box that parent's ears. I have first dibs.

Side note: As I was writing this blog I was watching the awarding of the FIFA World Cup hosts for 2018 and 2022. Russia won for 2018 and Qatar for 2022. The United States was thwarted in their bid for 2022, so it will be back to the drawing board for 2026, although the early favorite for that year is China.