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Parents Blog

Susan Boyd blogs on USYouthSoccer.org every Monday.  A dedicated mother and wife, Susan offers a truly unique perspective into the world of a "Soccer Mom". 

 

Money for nothing

Susan Boyd

Imagine receiving an e-mail that announces you can "Run your own soccer business!" Suddenly all those years of buying new cleats on a Monday and having them be too small by a Friday or learning that the World Cup ball you had imported from Germany has been kicked into the Menomonee River canal and is now drifting to Lake Michigan or being told that all soccer fees would be covered by the club meant a few soccer fees would be covered by the club now would no longer stress you out because you could be running a soccer business generating an income rather than sucking out a life's savings. Like all get-rich-quick schemes, this one has a few hiccups, but it was certainly enticing enough for me to not only read the e-mail clear through, but to actually click on a few links to learn more.

Here's the deal. A national soccer organization sponsors a toddler soccer training program, and my job, if I decided to seize the opportunity, would be to sell the program to existing establishments in my district to incorporate into their curricula. It could be schools, churches, day care centers, or soccer clubs. The various groups provide the facilities, while I provide the coaches, and the kids register and pay through the national sponsor. All of this sounds wonderful except for the money part. The kids pay $10 per hour of training and there's a coach to player ratio of 1:10. This means, if my math is right, that per hour I am collecting a maximum of $100. Out of that a coach has to be paid, marketing costs must be deducted, I'm certain that there are insurance fees, and the national organization will collect a percentage. If your profit is even $50, you'll need a minimum of 10 full classes every week of the year to scrape by at $24,000 a year.  You'll also need to be aggressive since you are competing with soccer clubs each having their own Mighty Mites, Micro Soccer, Kiddie Kixx, and Goal Gang toddler programs, so finding an open market might be difficult. A long time ago clubs figured out that attracting kids in the two to five-year-old range meant keeping them for their recreational soccer programs and possibly for their select programs, so they'll guard those recruits tenaciously.

The truth is that youth soccer isn't a money-making venture in the United States. Despite what you may believe after writing that check for spring soccer fees, no one in youth soccer is getting rich. I worked as a club administrator for four years and was paid for three of those years with enough to qualify me for food stamps if that was my only income. Then I moved up to the state association where I made the same salary only now I had to pay for a commute.   In effect what I earned being an administrator I paid back to a club as a soccer mom. I'm all for soccer being promoted at all ages, so I like the idea of a national organization trying to market a program for toddlers. They make no bones that their opportunity is more about being a salesperson than being a soccer person. A real go-getter in a virgin market might actually be able to sell the program to enough groups to nail down a living for awhile. But eventually you'll have to find something else.

I wish I could figure out a way to make money off of soccer. I certainly have invested enough time, attention, emotion, and money to hope for some kind of payoff. But I'm no different than any other soccer parent out there struggling to pay for uniforms, equipment, travel, fees, more travel, and all the "just because" monetary requests that come our way. I wrote a blog a few years back where I tallied all I had spent on soccer. I figured out that if I had put that money in treasury bonds I would have been able to easily pay for an Ivy League education for my sons. So we have to accept that the money we spend on soccer we spend because of the intangibles such as family togetherness, good health, fun, pride, and staying out of trouble (although that one doesn't always pan out). I am most definitely not a salesperson, so this income producer would never work out for me, but hopefully there are some bright, aggressive young people out there who can recognize an emerging market and make hay for a few years.   As for me, I'll just have to keep looking for that pot at the end of the rainbow which won't be filled with gold soccer balls.