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Parents Blog

Susan Boyd blogs on USYouthSoccer.org every Monday.  A dedicated mother and wife, Susan offers a truly unique perspective into the world of a "Soccer Mom". 

 

Soccer in print

Susan Boyd

We're in the midst of college football bowls, NFL playoffs and an abbreviated NBA season. We grew up with these sports. Even without serious interest, we understand the rules and follow the stars. Soccer has grown over the last twenty years in the United States, but we don't have the same internalized understanding of the game. Once our sons and daughters embrace soccer, we do our best to grasp the rules, make our acquaintance with the main players and immerse ourselves in the soccer community. Now that the holidays are over, we may have some gift certificates to bookstores that we can cash in. Here are some suggestions for reading that the entire family can enjoy and can help make soccer a more understandable sport.
 
For soccer news there are several great magazines out there which will give your family a contemporaneous understanding of the game. My favorite is "Soccer America" which you can receive in an email option called "Soccer America Daily". This option includes "Youth Soccer Insider" which offers both news about youth, high schoo, and college soccer, and also information on training, coaches, and recruiting (socceramerica.com). For more experienced players, my sons love "Four Four Two" out of England. This magazine focuses on British professional soccer, but also provides great articles on health, training and player profiles. A year's subscription comes in around $69 but the magazine is substantial (fourfourtwo.magazine.co.uk). For a more global view of the sport, I recommend "World Soccer." Bylines in this magazine come from some of the top reporters and experts in the sport (worldsoccer.com). The websites for these publications offer up some great articles without even subscribing. Finally there's "Fuel" magazine from US Youth Soccer. This annual publication offers up the best from the website and articles from top youth soccer experts. You can read it online at usyouthsoccer.org or order from the website.
 
For in-depth soccer education, there are a number of excellent books available. If you want to understand the rules of soccer better, you can go right to the source "Kwik Goal FIFA Rules of the Game" ($14 on Amazon). This book is updated yearly for referees and fans alike. The NCAA and most youth soccer games operate under slightly different rules, but this book covers enough common ground for fans to learn and understand how soccer games are governed. For less detail and more understandable rules, you can pick up a copy of "Official Soccer Rules Illustrated" ($11 on Amazon). The website Soccer for Parents has downloadable rule books for each youth level (soccer-for-parents.com/soccer-rule.html). Understanding the difference between what creates a goal kick and what creates a corner kick, or what the offsides rule really means can help make the game more enjoyable and help you cheer appropriately.
 
Most youth coaches are volunteers who have minimal soccer experience. We need these coaches because their dedication and investment can't be created, but the knowledge can be taught. If some of you signed up to coach this spring, you may be looking for some information. I do suggest that everyone get their USSF "G" License through U.S. Soccer, which most clubs and state organizations require. But the course can only cover so much information about actual coaching methods, so turning to some outside help is natural. How could you doubt a book with the reassuring title "The Complete Book of Coaching Youth Soccer" by Simon Whitehead? The book is endorsed by the National Youth Soccer Coaches Association and is available on Amazon for $12. The book provides a ten-week training program for various age levels along with illustrations. For the youngest group of players "The Baffled Parents Guide to Coaching 6-and-Under Soccer" by David Williams and Scott Graham has gotten rave reviews. While most readers stated that they knew soccer, they quickly realized that knowing the game and transferring that knowledge to a wild group of young soccer players are two very different skill sets. In addition there is "The Baffled Parents Guide to Coaching Youth Soccer" by Bobby Clark for older teams. The books use photos, lesson plans, and detailed explanations to help youth coaches convey the game to younger players. David Williams and Scott Graham have been youth coaches for years and bring their expertise to the book. Bobby Clark is the coach of the men's program at Notre Dame. Both books sell for $12 each at Amazon.
 
Kids tend to stick with sports when they have role models in the game that encourage them with their own stories of both success and loss. For some fictional soccer heroes there's the series "The Wild Soccer Bunch" by Joachim Masannek which has become a world-wide sensation. (Free book has been claimed). The series began in Germany and has been translated into dozens of languages. The books are appropriate for most elementary aged players and come recommended by Landon Donovan. Each book costs $10.50 on Amazon. "A Beautiful Game: The World's Greatest Players and How Soccer Changed Their Lives" by Tom Watt looks at players the world over including from Nigeria, Italy, and the United States to discover why soccer became so important to them. Unfortunately he only interviews male players, but the book is beautiful and 5 percent of the sales are donated to UNICEF ($19 on Amazon). For girls there's "The U.S. Women's Soccer Team: An American Success Story" by Clemente A. Lisi. The book examines the women's national team from their amazing success in 1999 to the present. Many of the top stars are interviewed (Hardcover $32 on Amazon).
 
If you put "soccer" in the Amazon search engine, you'll be faced with 19,000 choices. So there's no doubt that soccer has grown in the U.S. enough to make publishers confident that they can make money off of our interest. That also means that the few books I have mentioned above can lead to others. You can easily find any number of books that would interest your kids and yourself. Bringing a few soccer magazines and books into your home can help enrich your family's interest in the sport while providing some education. For a relatively minor investment you can create a fun and permanent soccer library that will augment and enlighten the sport.