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Parents Blog

Susan Boyd blogs on USYouthSoccer.org every Monday.  A dedicated mother and wife, Susan offers a truly unique perspective into the world of a "Soccer Mom". 

 

Ke Nako

Susan Boyd

Sports often become the allegory for other events. Father's Day has families replaying Field of Dreams where baseball provides the connection between a resentful adult son and his deceased father. Football is the backdrop for improving racial relations in Remember the Titans. Even soccer has been the means for a daughter to earn her father's respect in Gracie or break loose from traditions while still honoring her roots in Bend it Like Beckham. But this year South Africa invites the world to its home to show its political, economic, and social renovations. South Africa won its bid for the World Cup in 2004 just 10 years after officially abolishing apartheid. The World Cup has become not only an allegory for what the world can achieve but for how people previously oppressed both politically and economically can triumph. No matter if South Africa wins their first match against Mexico on June 11, as a nation they will have the pride of showcasing their independence and growth.

But their first opportunity came in 1995, one year after apartheid was entirely abolished and just months into Nelson Mandela's first year as president of South Africa. That year South Africa hosted the Rugby World Cup. Their team, the Springboks, was all-white with one lone black player, Chester Williams. Mandela, however, saw the team as a significant binding symbol for his country in turmoil. The slogan "One Team, One Country" epitomized Mandela's vision for what a sport could achieve. He met opposition from both blacks and whites for his support of the "Boks," but he recognized that if they could win the World Cup the victory could be a moment of pride to be shared by everyone in the country. The movie Invictus and the ESPN documentary The 16th Man chronicle these watershed moments for a country teetering on the brink of either social collapse or political unity. When Mandela, a former black political prisoner, handed the World Cup trophy to captain Francois Pienaar, a white member of the former ruling class, it was against the background of a united nation of sports fans both black and white who for that moment felt the kinship of a shared victory. You couldn't write a better Hollywood script.

Most youth players were born after the abolishment of apartheid and long after the Civil Rights Act in the U.S. But it's important to recognize that not too many years ago many of the sports images we take for granted couldn't and didn't exist. Sports have always been a means to highlight and overcome injustices. Jesse Owens made mincemeat of Hitler's Aryan hopes in the 1936 Olympics with grace and humility, proving that no one race has the monopoly on talent and class. Integrated sports teams are now not only accepted but expected. Even golf, which is often played on private golf courses with strict membership policies, has evolved.   Part of getting golf included in the Olympics is whether or not it is played at all levels "without discrimination with a spirit of friendship, solidarity and fair play."

Sports have also been used as one tool to put pressure on discriminatory practices. In South Africa athletes faced ostracism from major world events including the Olympics, rugby friendlies, and soccer competitions because of their country's policy of apartheid. Add to that economic trade embargos, including the British actors' union refusing to allow the sale of British T.V. programs to South Africa. In 1992 most of these bans were lifted as the apartheid policies were slowly repealed. So bringing the World Cup to Africa for the first time and giving South Africa the stage for this event has greater significance than any other World Cup. A stable shift of power happened in 1994 and a continued growth to equality and integration has established South Africa as an example of how the end of oppression doesn't need to lead to instability and continued violence. 

Did the Rugby World Cup set the foundation for a smooth transition of power? That's probably giving one sporting event too much credit. But it certainly was one of the defining moments in South Africa coming together as "A Rainbow Nation" as Mandela called it. My sons are African American, and we had hoped to afford a trip to South Africa for this World Cup not only because we love soccer but because for the boys' heritage this is a watershed moment. But we will have to content ourselves with watching on TV with all the other millions of soccer fans. While we watch hopefully we will not forget the historical canvas on which this sporting event plays out. There will always be distrust, hatred, prejudice, and domination from one group towards another. It's human nature. But remembering that 20 years ago the relatives of the black players on South Africa's soccer team couldn't vote, had to live in areas specifically designated for how they were defined racially, couldn't go to university with whites, couldn't set foot in whites only beaches, restaurants, and stores, couldn't travel outside of their designated areas without government permission, and for most wouldn't have been allowed to play for the national team indicates how significant this change is for the country, the continent and the world. The official slogan of this World Cup is "Ke Nako (It's Time). Celebrate Africa's Humanity." I'm ready.
 

Watch the game

Susan Boyd

Professional soccer hits its stride in the spring. Feb. 28 was the Carling Cup won by Manchester United. May 15 was the FA Cup won by Chelsea. May 22 is the UEFA Cup played between Inter Milan and Bayern Munich – which will be decided before you read this blog but after I wrote it! And on June 12 the World Cup begins in South Africa. While the majority of youth players won't have the privilege of playing in any of these events and most won't even have a chance to see one of these matches live, youth players and their families should still make these and other professional games part of their TV viewing schedule.

I'm supposing many in America will watch the U.S. team play their three group games in the World Cup which kicks off against England June 12 at 2:30 p.m. (ET) on ABC.   The England team may be strong enough to win the Cup, so that game in particular should hold some exciting possibilities for American fans. The U.S. doesn't need to beat England to advance, although they do need to beat the other two in their group. But beating England would certainly up the stock for respect by the soccer community. The U.S. is ranked 14th in the world while England is ranked 8th, so there's a chance for an upset. Despite loyalty and expectations, watching the World Cup shouldn't be limited to the U.S. matches.

Many of the world's greatest players return to their home countries to compete in the World Cup. Didier Drogba, the stand-out player on Chelsea, plays for the Ivory Coast. You might not consider looking for the Ivory Coast games in the World Cup schedule, but that team will provide some of the best soccer you'll see. Overshadowed by the Cameroon and Nigerian teams they have fought their way up to a respectable 4th place in the African continental rankings with some strong victories in the months leading up to the World Cup, including a 3-1 win over Ghana. Other players of note should encourage us to watch more than just the U.S.: Samuel Eto'o from Cameroon a member of the UEFA finalist Inter Milan, Mark Schwarzer from Australia a member of Fulham UEFA Cup runners-up, and Theofanis Gekas from Greece, a member of Eintracht Frankfurt and the top European World Cup qualifier goal scorer.

Youth players and their parents should make it a regular habit to watch as many professional games as possible. Developing that keen eye and inherent understanding of the sport through consistent exposure to the highest level of play remains an essential component to both succeeding at and loving the game. Parents can benefit through a clearer understanding of the rules and how far rough play can go before referees make a call. Watching replays of fouls, goals, questionable play, outstanding play, and set plays helps both youth players and parents appreciate the nuances and requirements of the game. Most of us didn't play the sports we watch but we understand them because we watch them so often. 

When families watch professional soccer games on a regular basis it helps establish the legitimacy of and respect for the sport. If we send the message that soccer isn't worth watching then we also send the message that it isn't worth playing. Kids need to know that their choices are considered significant and valuable. Sitting down and enjoying a game together gives that support unambiguously to the player. In addition there's that aspect of bonding over a game that I've always thought justifies the hours of soccer viewing that goes on in my household.  Maybe I'm just rationalizing so I don't have to feel so badly that the grass isn't getting mowed or the screens aren't being replaced. But I do believe for the really big games, those memories of sharing the moment with one another outweigh some of the chores.

Here are links to the TV schedules for upcoming soccer games. Take the time to click on them, print them off, and then decide which ones you'll watch as a family. I can guarantee not only some serious thrills, but also some excellent insights to this game the world loves.
 
 
 
 

Age of reckoning

Susan Boyd

Last week a Texas high school basketball player was busted for being 22 years old.  He was outed at a tournament where his former Florida high school coaches recognized him.  Ramifications of this discovery comprise his Texas team forfeiting all their games including the state championship and a renewed discussion on how we can insure that youth sports are played by youth.  Every couple of years a sports prodigy pops who challenges our ideas of what a youth player should be able to accomplish.  That challenge ultimately leads to endless forums questioning the player's age.  Once an overage player is discovered, everyone suffers from guilt by association.

Most of us remember the dust-up over Freddy Adu.  The soccer player from Ghana was just 14 years old when he was selected in the 2004 MLS draft by DC United.  Because he had immigrated to the United States at age 8 many sports writers questioned his actual birth date which is listed as June 2, 1989, making him just a week younger than my oldest son.  So the swirling arguments were not only fascinating but also relevant.  During many of Bryce's games we parents on the sidelines would comment on the "Adu situation."  Most of it was fueled by jealousy, but part of it was fueled by incredulity.  How could anyone be that good that young?  Issues which never came up in normal conversation were suddenly on the lips of most soccer parents:  bone length studies, DNA analysis, cranial evaluation.  In the end Freddy played in the MLS and on the 2008 U.S. Olympic team, was picked up by overseas clubs, and then essentially faded into the broad spectrum of American soccer players abroad.  His brightly burning star cooled to the same temperature as any of his peers because once the age issue was no longer significant the only aspect of his career that mattered was his talent which has dipped in comparison recently.  He didn't even make the U.S. roster for the World Cup team.  

Scandals involving Little League players show up regularly because the age limits for the World Series teams are extremely tight.  In 2001 a pitching phenomenon led his team to a third place finish in the World Series only to have that finish wiped from the record books when it was revealed that he was overage by just a few months.  Danny Altimonte, now 23 years old, had baseball success in high school helping his team win the state championship, and is working towards developing a coaching career.  His unfortunate miss of the age deadline really shouldn't eclipse his ability to pitch at 90 miles an hour while waiting for his voice to change.  But for the purposes of rules and an even playing field, those few months became the story.  Controversy over players both on foreign teams and foreign players on U.S. teams has plagued the Little League.  Inaccurate birth certificates, easily doctored records, and missing documentation all contribute to serious questions about player eligibility.  Of course, if a player is average, no one bothers with questions about age or eligibility.

When Robbie was in preschool his best friend was a boy two months his junior and over a foot taller.  While Robbie was in the lower fifth percentile on the growth chart, his friend was off the scale.  When they played sports together no one believed that this boy was actually the younger of the two.  Many people seriously questioned his age and therefore called into question his athletic ability as being only an offshoot of his "true" age.  It certainly made things awkward at soccer games where opposing team coaches and parents would loudly protest his participation.  The poor kid, who absolutely was the age he said he was, felt dishonest and unworthy.  His parents grew weary of defending their six year old from ugly verbal attacks.  He eventually switched to football, which was better suited for his frame and once he got to middle school he had several teammates bigger than he was, so no one challenged his age any longer.

Robbie faced a different age challenge because he was born on Dec. 27, making him young for his US Youth Soccer Olympic Development Program team.  He would often moan about not being born four days later so he could play on the next year up.  And he was right.  His very same skills would be more impressive against players six months younger than he was instead of six months older than he was.  But those were the rules.  The disparity in age got less and less significant as he grew older because the physical development of the boys evened out, and Robbie got more "looks" once he reached age 14.  On the other hand his teammate, Josh Lambo, was just a month older than Robbie and he joined FC Dallas when he was 17.  So birthdates aren't the only factor in a player's success or controversy.

The downside of players being overage exists more for the team than for the player.  Although the 22-year-old basketball player is under arrest for identity theft and other crimes related to his unfortunate choice, the real losers are his teammates who now will forfeit that all-important high school memory of a state championship.  The Little League pitcher has obviously gone on to forge his future in baseball, but his teammates will forever have the bitter taste of a significant accomplishment taken away.  Somewhere in this huge world of 6 billion people there are kids who develop early, possess talent beyond their years, and find their accomplishments called into question.  Right now the buzz in the soccer world is about a 9-year-old Brazilian and an 8-year-old Dutch boy who apparently have skills that beg the issue if they could really be that good and that young.  In 10 years they will either have risen to epic status or become just another good soccer player.  The real reckoning will depend on several factors:  talent, opportunity, drive, and development.  Amazingly those are the same factors that affect any young player, sensation or not.  While our children may not be awarded a million dollar Nike contract before getting their driver's licenses, they will be awarded the fun and memories of playing the sport they love and the chance to make something great out of their experience.  We'll even joke that once they hit the big time we'll get all those thousands of dollars invested in their play returned with interest.  Just one more thing, if your kids get there before mine do, toss a few crumbs my way.
 

Soccer is the key

Susan Boyd

Last week I spent Friday evening with a group of women friends for a "Happy Hour" of drinks and conversation. I met the woman hosting when our sons all went to the same preschool. Of the other women invited I knew one through American Field Service foreign exchanges, another because her son played baseball with Robbie one summer when they were 10, another because we attended a Passover Seder together, and one became a new acquaintance that evening. Yet all of us shared one thing in common – soccer.

I have begun to think that soccer is the new social networking media. While Facebook and Twitter have faster connection times, soccer has that steady, solid base that takes families through years of connection. Although none of our children ever played soccer together, we women all knew instantly the same stories, adventures, concerns, joys, and frustrations. We all had endured coaches who were mean or played favorites, we had stayed in flea bag hotels or paid way too much for a team dinner, we had washed uniforms in a tiny sink, pulled Band-Aids from our purses for an emergency blister, eaten junk food to the point that gourmet meant a burger with a tomato on it, driven thousands of miles, sat in the rain, and loved every minute of it. I had a band of sisters rising from the shared experiences of soccer.

I know that other sports could be as bonding, but for some reason, sitting in a group, when people talk about youth sports and find the common ground for discussion it seems to gravitate towards soccer. I'd like to think that's because first and foremost soccer is consistently and for the long term played equally by boys and girls, which you won't find with football, occasionally find with baseball (softball), and do find with basketball but with physical limitations, which cut down the pool of players as they grow older. Soccer can be played by anyone at any age in any physical shape or size. There are over-30, over-50, women, co-ed, youth, rec, select, and Major League teams. It's not surprising that when my husband talks about his patients he invariably mentions that they play soccer or have kids who play soccer. Even his nurse used to play college soccer.

Networking has become such an essential part of any business model, and soccer has one of the best networks around. I can't go long without bumping into something connected to youth soccer. The other night in a deli a father and son walked in and the son had soccer gear on. After dinner we went to the bookstore and three other soccer families were there. On the way home six of the cars on the two mile trip had soccer club stickers in the window. If I want to open a conversation with a stranger, I'll often start with some soccer question. I am rarely met with a blank, confused stare. If you want to instantly be part of group, soccer is your key.

Therefore I don't understand why businesses don't capitalize on that network more often. For example, most soccer tournaments are huge, covering acres of area with thousands of participants, spectators, and coaches. If businesses and soccer tournament organizers joined forces they could create a mutually beneficial arrangement. People attending a tournament come from all walks of life and have a huge variety of interests. It's a perfect place to test various demographics and gather pertinent data during those down times between games when everyone is looking for something to fill the gaps. I could see booths that offer cosmetics, electronics, shoes, restaurant samples, airlines, and other products people use regularly, not just cleats and head bands. Show soccer moms a booth demonstrating relaxation products and you'll have a line three fields long. Give soccer players a chance to test a new cereal, I can guarantee they'll use their electronic messaging to spread their approval to friends and family. The tentacles of the soccer community run far and wide. There aren't many consumer groups that have grown as dramatically as the players registered with US Youth Soccer Association growing from 100,000 in 1974 to more than 3 million today. Each of those 3 million players has parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, siblings, teachers, and neighbors. I can image if Apple demonstrated their iPad at soccer tournaments the word would spread as quickly as a 30 second spot during "Lost." I'd think that would be a marketer's dream and the key to some significant sales.