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Parents Blog

Susan Boyd blogs on USYouthSoccer.org every Monday.  A dedicated mother and wife, Susan offers a truly unique perspective into the world of a "Soccer Mom". 

 

Sunscreen . . .Check!

Susan Boyd

           Traveling for soccer requires a mobilization of resources that stay pretty much the same whether you're going ten miles for a league game or hundreds of miles for a tournament. I divide these resources into the bare essentials and my essentials. Traveling by car makes the transport of all these essentials easier than going by air, so I have some hints for the later. But first – the list.

            I keep a ""soccer box"" in my car stocked with the following items: paper towels, toilet paper, wet ones, bug spray, sunscreen, quart size plastic bags, plastic shopping bags, 33 gallon plastic garbage bags, hats, visors, gloves, travel-size umbrellas, rain ponchos, extra socks, safety pins, duct tape, travel sewing kit, band-aids, anti-bacterial cream, and scissors. A few of these smaller items I grab out of the box and stick in a bag to take with me directly to the field since they might be more useful there than in my trunk. The plastic bags are invaluable for keeping your car clean and not smelling like wet grass and sweat. I cover the floor of my car with the large garbage bags like cheap floor carpets. I can fold up any mess, shake it out on the ground, and then reuse the bags. Believe me having a roll of toilet paper at these large tournaments has been a blessing. I hate, hate, hate portable toilets, but you can't avoid them when you're playing in a corn field fifty miles from a sewage line.  There's only one thing worse than a portable toilet and that's a portable toilet without toilet paper. The wet ones may be your only sanitizing possibility after visiting these traveling thrones.

            Besides the ""box"" I have several other items in my car. These include full-size umbrellas, portable chairs, a shoe drier, binoculars, maps (despite GPS these can be useful), light and dark t-shirts (you never know who will forget a uniform), and lots and lots of water. These are all easy to have along with you if traveling by car, but once you have to fly, the rules change. Now since airlines charge for the oxygen you breathe and expect you to bring your own flotation device, it's not the same game for soccer travelers. Here's where bare and my essentials come into play.

            Bare essentials are uniforms, cleats, shin guards, keeper gloves and necessary forms. Players and spectators on a very sunny day or at dusk when the mosquitoes arise will argue that sunscreen and bug spray are bare essentials. However, when I travel I say that if I have my tickets, my ID, a credit card and some cash, I'm good to go. I can find everything else once I land. I'm resourceful if nothing else. I can easily make my own soccer box for my rental car. Toilet paper's a snap…I just take the extra roll from the hotel and return it if I don't use it. I also ask housekeeping for a roll of paper towels. TSA's restriction on liquids means that I leave the bug spray and sunscreen at home. Instead I depend on a big box store to supply me with my essentials. 

            I make a run often before unpacking. I collect the bug spray, sunscreen, anti-bacterial cream, tape and scissors, since they may qualify as a weapon when flying. As many of you know, I love a good portable chair. I have a favorite that I like to use, but I can't take it on air trips any longer. So I just nab a cheap one from the store. The cheap ones usually advertise some local team, so that's why on recent trips I have been a supporter of the Dallas Cowboys, the L.A. Angels, and the Orlando Magic. After the last game I make a gift of the chair to someone at the park.

            (Pardon the interruption…the U.S. just scored against Algeria in the 92nd minute insuring us to move into the round of 16)

            Many of the other items I can tuck into the corners of my luggage such as rain ponchos, plastic bags, sewing kit, visors, safety pins, extra socks, and travel umbrellas. In fact I used to keep a separate ""airplane soccer box"" but I never put it back together after the flooding in my house. Still, it's not a bad idea to have a few sandwich bags filled with these items set aside in a drawer that you can quickly gather and toss into the bags as you pack them. You can even throw the rain ponchos in the soccer bag, since they can provide some much appreciated cover while on the bench. I used to keep in the soccer bags one of those ""solar"" blankets made out of mylar that you can get at a sporting goods store. But they both disappeared after games and I never replaced them. But they can be great wind and rain guards for team members on the bench during a stormy game.

            The final tip I'll offer is to go to these coupon web sites and look up some of the restaurants you might visit on your way to the tournaments and while you're at your destination. Some coupons even have 2 for 1 offers which can make trips much more affordable. Check out what restaurants, entertainment options, malls, etc. can be found at your destination. Most mapping websites such as Google Maps have the ability to indicate these options on their maps. That way you'll know ahead of time where you can nab that early morning mocha or bowl a few lines. You'll also know what coupons to be on the lookout for.

            For this trip we're driving, so I have the advantage of being able to take everything along that I want including my favorite chair. I'll toss in my list of nearby attractions, fold my coupons into my wallet, turn on my satellite radio to listen in on World Cup games, and take off for Dayton. I'll let you know how the drive went.
 

Another road trip

Susan Boyd

I'm excited. I get to attend the US Youth Soccer Regional Championship for Region II because Robbie's team won State Cup. I love Regionals. There's pageantry and an expectation that fills the event with energy. I love going to different states to see different soccer fields. It's like having the office over for dinner. You get out the good china, you polish the silver, you clean the house, you buy flowers, and you put on your best outfits. I'm so happy to be on the guest list!

Getting to the championships means working through several rounds of competition. Emerging victorious puts teams in an elite group that only grows more elite the farther up you go. Any young soccer player who aspires to higher levels of soccer will want to play in his or her State Championship and hopefully in Regional and National Championships. Many of the best American players have had the thrill of playing in and even winning these events. It starts with working hard at practice, developing individual and team talent throughout the year, being dedicated to fitness (Robbie hated running 7 miles a day with his team but it paid off), and making some sacrifices along the way. But the result is a week of great competition, fun, and networking. Some of Robbie's and Bryce's soccer friends are kids they met at these events. Players can't help but be impressed by the talent they face and the elevated level of competition required of them.

By the time you read this Region III will be ready to enter its quarterfinals in Baton Rouge, but Region IV will just be getting the first games of the round robin started in Albuquerque, N.M., Region II will kick off on Saturday in Beavercreek, Ohio (a suburb of Dayton), and Region I will begin July 2in Barboursville, W.Va., home to Marshall University. If the event is nearby your hometown, then by all means take a day to see what your Region has to offer and what your own players can aspire to achieve. Schedules are on the various regional websites which can be accessed from http://championships.usyouthsoccer.org/2010_Play_Dates_Regional_and_National_Competitions.asp?. The events will cost you no more than a parking permit and you can then share in all the activities, booths, and viewing the competitions that Regionals offer.

I did check that my hotel has ESPN and ESPN2 so I will miss as little as possible of the World Cup action. But I have to admit that attending the Region II Championship to watch my son and his team play serves as a significant reason to miss a World Cup game!! While each age bracket begins with around 12 to 16 teams, only one will advance to the National Championships. So every game provides the heart-pounding repercussions that a World Cup team faces, only with your own children facing them. The oohs and ahhs that accompany every shot, every save, every pass, and every foul have far more electricity than your same investment in a World Cup game. Thank goodness it's only one game a day, unless you have two or more kids on different teams. There were two years where both boys competed, and I think I owe my grey hair to the stress of two games a day for those three days each year.

I'll have a few more blogs this next week because I'll be at the Region II Championships, and I hope to pass on a bit of the flavor of the event. We'll be driving 400 miles to Dayton, which in and of itself could be a saga since we will be carpooling a number of boys and then I am half of the official chaperones. There will be hotels, trips to and from the fields, discovering things to do for 18 restless boys, and reconnecting with my old haunts in the Dayton area. I am an Ohio girl although I only lived there the first five years of my life. But nearly every relative on my father's side and a fair number on my mother's side filled out a significant percentage of the Ohio census forms. I used to say that you couldn't name a town in Ohio that didn't have one of my relatives living in it. That's less true now as I've gotten older, but I have relatives in some pretty out of the way hamlets as well as the cities. So I'm ready for another road trip. Bring it on!
 

All eyes turn to South Africa

Susan Boyd

Whether or not you love soccer you can't avoid it for the next four weeks. It has taken over the airwaves, the sports news, the evening news, the ticker tapes under programs, and advertising. World Cup fever has infected our house completely. There are no other TV channels available except ESPN and ABC. Four weeks of "GOOOOOOOOOOOOOAL" and heartache. Four weeks of second guessing and hoping. Four weeks of supreme misery and supreme joy. If you love soccer, you've got to love the World Cup which trumps any soap opera with more intensity and intrigue than a crime drama, more entertainment than any comedy, and more international exposure than any history lesson. Usually summer soccer limits itself to camps and tournaments, but every four years there's a larger stage for this sport that has captivated the world and is slowly winning over America one family at a time.

I remember watching my first soccer game in 1965. I don't remember their opponent, but I do remember the Italian National team. Why? Because the players crumpled to the grass on every real or imagined touch to their bodies and writhed in agony until an official suggested they should get up. Miraculously they recovered and often went on to achieve some spectacular steal or score. I thought they were incredible babies. My opinion has changed over time and experience. I still think Italians dissolve more easily than other nations, but I now understand the philosophy and the reasoning behind those breakdowns. In 34 years of watching soccer I've grown quite a bit in my understanding of the game, but I still learn something new every time I see a contest.

This will be my 11th World Cup, although it will be the first in which I have the opportunity to easily see all the games. Thank goodness the US sponsored the World Cup in 1994 which ushered in the deep TV coverage in America that most of us depend upon for our World Cup experience. This year the World Cup coverage is deeper than ever with TV, HD, mobile phone, and internet coverage. No matter where I am, I'll be able to tune into the World Cup and with my DVR and ESPN3.com, even if I absolutely can't tune in at that moment, I'll still be able to see the complete game and hear it announced in several languages should I decide to practice my fading German and French. I have push notifications coming to my cell phone to report half time and final scores as well as injury reports, cards, and substitutions. 

As part of the anticipation leading up to the World Cup, South Africa sponsored a music festival in Johannesburg. Although most of the audience clearly called South Africa home, there were flags from all over the world waving during the performances. The show brought out some emotional feelings as the camera panned the multi-racial crowd enjoying the same music, the same night air, and the same experiences without borders or animosity. This international spirit of cooperation embedded in international competition always brings a lump to my throat. I'm a sucker for the Olympics, Summer and Winter, and I truly love the World Cup. Within the confines of international rules governing these games, nations can compete, win or lose, and shake hands at the end to go on to another contest or go home. There are individual bad behaviors which mar the overall civilized nature of the month's games, but thankfully those are few and quickly dealt with.

I'll probably write a few more blogs about the World Cup, so forgive me this indulgence. But I can't emphasize enough the significance of this event. Soccer has many large stages, but none so large as the World Cup. As a soccer fan and a soccer mom, I have to celebrate these four weeks. But especially as a mom I'm thankful for an experience we share as a family. I love the hours of white knuckles, agony, and unfettered joy that a delicious World Cup game offers to young and old. It's better than a 3D movie, which by the way is probably how you'll watch the World Cup next time around on your personal mobile TV. Believe me . . . this World Cup has just begun and I can't wait until 2014 in Brazil.
 

Stealthy Healthy

Susan Boyd

Last week I had my annual doctor's appointment which means I actually saw her 18 months ago. You know how that goes. Good intentions don't always translate into action. Because I had some vitamin D deficiency and some low potassium, it got me thinking again about the snacks I provide before and after games to help boost the various electrolytes and vitamin levels that can deplete with heavy activity and loss of fluids. While there are sport drinks which concentrate on three electrolytes levels and carbohydrates through sugars, they don't cover everything. Young players, to perform at top health and ability, need regular vitamins, fiber, and calcium in addition to common electrolytes and carbohydrates. No drink can give them all they need, so adding some healthy before and after game snacks makes sense.

We all hear about potassium and the important role it plays in helping muscles to fire. The stand-by for potassium has been bananas, which are a good source of potassium, but not the best. In fact on the scale of the best foods which give a potassium boost, bananas hold the bottom place. What they do offer is potassium without sodium, a huge bonus since several potassium-rich foods also contain a fair amount of sodium. A better alternative would be a snack box of raisins which provide 1020 mg of potassium as compared to 400 mg from a banana, and they only have 60 mg of sodium. Sultanas have even less sodium, 20 mg, and 1050 mg of potassium, but they are usually more difficult to find and not as appealing to young players. If your children like fresh apricots, then that's the ultimate potassium provider with 1380 mg of potassium and only 15 mg of sodium. They need to eat four apricots to get those benefits, so they had better love them!

Children need energy from carbohydrates, but like everything in life, there are good and bad varieties. You'll want carbs that aren't easily digested. These will usually come from foods high in fiber content and not processed.   For example, fresh oranges have half the sugar and twice the fiber of orange juice. As a rule of thumb for fruits and vegetables those with vibrant colors indicate more nutritional benefits. Additionally, since vegetables are usually a hard sell, I found that color did encourage my children to at least try a taste so I opted for red, yellow, and orange peppers rather than the standby green ones.   They usually cost more, but if the children eat them, the expense is worth it.  If you go green then the darker and richer the green, the more vitamins and nutrients contained within. One great source of carbohydrates on the way to or from a game is graham crackers. You need to be sure that these are made with graham and whole wheat rather than refined bleached flour. Usually the whole wheat flour has been fortified with vitamin B 1 and B 2, another nutritional plus. They also come in a low-fat option that does have a bit more sugar for taste. 

Granola bars can be a source of both carbohydrates and fiber, but be careful of the refined sugar content. Even though a chocolate covering can make a bar palatable for children used to sugary cereals and drinks, it negates the benefits the bars provide. Reading labels, now that the government requires significant detail in the explanations, can insure you get the healthiest option. If you use granola bars as a team snack, be sure you check for nut allergies since many bars either contain nuts or are manufactured in a factory that has nuts on the premises. When you find a good bar, you can't beat the convenience of throwing a few in a purse or backpack to curb a child's hunger after a game.

Calcium often goes hand in hand with fat, so you need to find sources that have a low fat option. Milk is high in calories, so it's not the best source for calcium. In fact all the dairy family of products offer good sources of calcium, but need to be consumed in moderation. I grew up in a household that drank whole milk like water, not very heart-healthy. To this day, the best I can do is 2% milk because I grew up with a beverage that didn't let light through the glass. I have opted for calcium enriched orange juice, which has natural sugars, but no fat. Other sources of calcium are leafy vegetables, again a hard sell for children, but some will eat broccoli. We called it "tree" and even today the children still call it that. For convenience you can turn to the low-fat yogurts in a tube, but again read the label carefully to avoid those yogurts high in sugar and fat. The advantage of the tubes is that they can be frozen and become a healthy alternative to ice cream bars. They also make a wonderful team snack.

There's a great resource on the internet provided by Harvard School of Public Health that details not only high-quality nutrition options, but also has recipes and links to other information (http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/). Another resource is Everyday Health (http://www.everydayhealth.com/) which has a wonderful and clear guide to the nutritional and caloric contents of many fresh and packaged foods. Additional manufacturers provide the nutritional information for their products on their websites which you can locate through a search. That way you can compare labels in the comfort of your easy chair before heading out to the grocery. Ultimately no source can supplement the information you glean from your personal physician who knows your family's health and what will benefit it best. So be sure to check with him or her if you have any concerns or questions.

We can provide healthy snacks before and after games that supply the necessary nutrients a young athlete needs. Sports drinks can replenish some of those elements, but not all. Children need to have the broad spectrum of vitamins, minerals, electrolytes, carbohydrates, proteins, and even fats to operate their bodies at optimal levels. As parents, we can pack a pretty good pre- and post-game variety of foods that meet the requirements of good health and good taste.