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Parents Blog

Susan Boyd blogs on USYouthSoccer.org every Monday.  A dedicated mother and wife, Susan offers a truly unique perspective into the world of a "Soccer Mom". 

 

Not Exactly Nostradamus

Susan Boyd

Most pundits like to consider the year in review during this season and with a new decade beginning the review can extend back to 2000. I'd rather look forward – primarily because I don't have that good of a memory and I'm too lazy to do any research. So I'd like to make some predictions about soccer for the coming year.

First, I predict the U.S. Men's National Team will advance out of their bracket during the World Cup this June in South Africa. I also predict I won't be attending. I looked up a few packages for the World Cup and discovered that unless I had been a "retired" CEO for some of the failed banks and brokerage firms last year I couldn't hope to come up with enough money to attend. Most tour packages including airfare begin at $5000 per person. Of course for that price you only get one ticket to one game. Just for fun, since I couldn't afford Economy, I check on First Class. After all, if I can't attend, I may as well not attend on the highest level, which begins at $25,000. I've needed a tooth implant for the past five years which will cost me $1600 after insurance. Every time I get that much money together I have some child related expense. So even if I decided to remain toothless and deprive my children of their education, that $1600 would only take me somewhere over the Atlantic. I'll also go out on a limb and predict that I won't be attending the World Cup in 2014 in Brazil unless I win the lottery which I have been predicting I'll win for the last two decades.

Second, I predict that youth soccer will grow by at least 2 percent this year which is a pretty safe prediction given the fact that high school soccer has grown 72 percent in the past ten years compared to football, basketball, and baseball at 3.4 percent, 5.1 percent, and 7 percent respectively as reported by American Soccer History (http://homepages.sover.net/~spectrum/).   Also our local soccer store opened a new branch last year. I figure any business that expands in last year's economy has to be based on a fairly strong growth curve. Now I just need someone to do a survey to prove me right.

Third, I predict we'll see another major shift in youth soccer training and competition in the next two to three years. In the 12 years my sons have been in youth soccer they have seen the formation of US Club Soccer, the Y-League, Regional League, Red Bull League, USSF Development Academy, and the US Youth Soccer National League. Some new variations on those programs or entirely new programs will arrive on the youth soccer scene to further confuse parents and complicate decision-making. While most changes look good on paper, in practice they end up with lots of bumps requiring either refinement or complete overhauls. Once soccer gets to the numbers here it enjoys in other countries, we'll be able to develop a nationwide training and development model which will provide all youth soccer players with convenient, consistent, and significant opportunities to advance to the higher levels of the sport. For the time being, youth players are well-served by programs supported through US Youth Soccer Association and their local state Soccer Associations. While development isn't perfect, it does exist with identification programs such as US Youth Soccer Olympic Development Program and increasingly stronger requirements for coaches' training and licenses.

Finally, I predict that youth soccer will continue to provide players with a great forum for physical fitness, mental development, and fun. There's nothing to compare to watching a six year old streaking towards the goal, shooting, and scoring. The joy on her face can't be erased by the fans' knowledge that she streaked the wrong direction! When kids run on that field, begin to kick the ball around, and discover that they can actually look just like the pros they see on TV, the pride and pleasure are priceless. I think the real allure of soccer comes from how easily anyone can play the game. You don't really need any equipment. Many kids around the world don't even have a ball. As long as players have an open area with something round to kick, they can play soccer. This is a sport that comes from the heart of the player. So I predict the more we play, the more we'll love the game.
 

'Tis the Season for Giving

Susan Boyd

Last week I talked about some ways you could find appropriate gifts for the soccer player or fan in your family. But we also realize that many children don't have access to even the barest necessities of life including food, clothes, medicine, and housing. Many soccer associations and players have formed charitable organizations to address the needs of children through the game itself. While there are literally hundreds of these organizations throughout the world, I'd like to point out a few that could use your support this holiday season as well as the rest of the year. Consider donating to one of these foundations as part of your gift giving tradition.

America SCORES (www.americascores.org) is an innovative foundation that serves 14 metropolitan areas in the United States. It provides after school soccer for inner city kids while also engaging them in a writing and literacy program. Using soccer as a means to both recruit and excite the children, the foundation then shifts during inclement weather to a literacy program tied to the kids' experiences both on the soccer pitch and in their world.  Sponsors of the program are diverse ranging from ASCAP, which is a song composers' organization to adidas. Nearly 100% of donations to the organization are used directly for the program as it is largely volunteer-staffed. The poetry the kids have created in the program has been featured on Wall Street and the Sunday Boston Globe.

Many of you will use Hanukkah and Christmas as a time to replace cleats, jerseys, and other soccer equipment, most of which will still be useable. The U.S. Soccer Foundation (www.ussoccerfoundation.org/site/c.ipIQKXOvFoG/b.5438455/k.CCC2/Passback.htm) sponsors a program called Passback which collects, organizes, and sends out used soccer gear to kids in need both here in the U.S. and around the world. Usually they will advertise a collection two or three times a year through each US Youth Soccer State Association office. Clubs are asked to collect donations and bring them to the state office. Or you can organize your own collection and arrange with the foundation for pick-up. Naturally monetary donations are also welcomed.

In 1997 Garret Hamm, Mia's brother, passed away due to complications from aplastic anemia. The best hope for a cure for many patients is a bone marrow transplant. Therefore Mia formed her Mia Foundation (www.miafoundation.org) to raise research funds for and awareness about bone marrow transplants and to provide support for families going through the process. In addition she uses her foundation to promote the growth of women's sports. She wants to see the progress made in the last ten years continue so that all girls who wish to play sports have that opportunity.

With the first ever World Cup in Africa coming in 2010, eyes will be upon both South Africa and on the entire continent. Unfortunately HIV and AIDS continue to be a deadly epidemic throughout Africa. In 2002 Tommy Clark, who had played soccer professionally in Zimbabwe and then became a physician, joined with other soccer players, including Ethan Zohn who won Survivor, to form Grass Root Soccer (www.grassrootsoccer.org). They had the idea that kids learn best from people they respect as role models. So using soccer players and the sport, the organization entered Zimbabwe with the mission to stem the advance of HIV/AIDS in the country through a soccer centered education program. Using an innovative "Skillz" program, the foundation teaches kids how to prevent HIV. The program has now spread to other African nations and has the support of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

All over the world soccer can be found in the most impoverished areas of any country or city. In the United States soccer has gained a reputation as a more elitist sport for those who have the money for club fees, travel, and top gear. However, in the streets of Rio de Janeiro or the dusty back fields of Botswana, kids play soccer bare foot with a melon or a bucket for a ball. That passion for and universal attraction of the game became the starting point for Street Soccer USA (www.streetsoccerusa.org). Founders use soccer as a means to reach homeless men, women, and children, bring them into a community of players, and create leagues in order to provide them with a purpose beyond crime or self-destruction. The idea is to end homelessness through soccer. The organization has teams in sixteen metropolitan areas. Their model uses a mentoring program to help players get off drugs, deal with mental health issues, find employment, and eventually permanent housing. They have reached 20 percent of the homeless in the areas they serve and have a 75 percent success rate in affecting a life change among the population they reach.

We can affect a major change in someone's life with a simple donation of $5.00. Just think if every US Youth Soccer member contributed $5.00 to one of these or any other charitable organization, we would make a net $15 million contribution to those in need. We can be a powerful factor in helping the poor in America and around the world. So please consider clicking on one of the links above and giving them a small donation that when joined with others can be a significant gift.
 

It Takes Thought to Find a Gift that Counts

Susan Boyd

Winter holidays mean three things: the celebration of beliefs and traditions; less soccer; and gift buying. Families make their own decision about the first, and I can't really do much about the second, but I can help out with the third. Soccer fans, especially young soccer fans, have no end of soccer items they want (translate – need) to get them through any winter hiatus and give them a reason to last until spring. Unfortunately soccer gear usually comes with a very high price and professional teams have a way of redesigning their jerseys every year, so that last year's $75 jersey needs to be replaced by this year's $80 jersey. Additionally, star players move among the top international clubs and change numbers as well as affiliations. So kids don't want to be wearing Ronaldinho's Barcelona 10 jersey. They want his A.C. Milan 80 jersey instead. If we had Ronaldinho's $30 million contract, we could easily keep up. But most of us are just trying to get by with far fewer zeros on our pay checks.

So what can we get for a more modest sum that answers the wants and needs of our younger soccer fans? Plenty, it turns out if we think creatively.

Let's start with small items that can be stocking stuffers or help stretch out the gifts over Hanukkah. Zipper pulls run around $3 and come in the classic soccer ball design or in team logos. They can add some pizzazz to a warm up or a soccer bag. And speaking of soccer bags, consider purchasing a luggage tag that you can have custom made for your player. These usually run between $10 and $20 depending on how much customization you have done from name and address on already designed tags to having a cut-out of your club's logo. It certainly helps to quickly identify your child's bag from the long identical line of bags behind the bench. To keep that bag from getting too rancid buy several bag dog deodorizers at $10 each. Shoe bags are a great way to keep mud, indoor rubber confetti, and moisture from ruining everything in the soccer backpack. They usually cost between $10 and $15. Girls appreciate rubber hair bands and sleeve clips that get lost easily. Packages holding five or ten of each usually cost under $10.

Unique gifts for $20 to $50 exist for any soccer fan. Rugs, wastebaskets, sheet sets, wall stickers, and over door hanging racks all come with pro team designs or have soccer themes and can brighten up a bedroom. I found a magnetic soccer cork board that hangs on the refrigerator and can be used to tack up maps to games, game schedules, and photos and programs making them readily accessible and easy to change. These boards cost between $15 and $30 depending on size and design. Glitter soccer tote bags in hot pink, fluorescent green, and brilliant purple could add that extra flair to a girl's soccer bag and help hold jewelry, hair brushes, and toiletries in style for $17. Mom might appreciate soccer themed jewelry in necklaces, earrings, and hair clips for around $20 each. Dad could go for a soccer tie, soccer socks, or a soccer headband in the $20 range.

Getting a gift for the coach isn't always easy. Any coach who has seen a few years on the pitch already has a cupboard full of soccer mugs and a tree full of soccer ornaments. Finding a more personal and memorable gift can be solved with a few of these items. For around $17 you can get a soccer autograph pillow that every player can sign for the coach. Coach Guy Newman designed a Coach Deck which is a set of cards for $22 which show over 50 drills divided into passing, dribbling, shooting, and defense. They fit easily into a pocket or backpack. For $45 you could get your coach a PEET shoe dryer which he and she would definitely appreciate so that they didn't need to stand in wet shoes on the sidelines for several games over a tournament weekend. Buying a soccer frame and then making a collage with team photos, autographs, and team records would create a wonderful personal coach's gift for under $50.

Instead of jerseys which can run as much as $100, consider buying a club team or national team flag for around $40. The boys hung them as room dividers and on their doors. For a bit less you can buy a soccer scarf for $25 either for national or individual professional teams. Robbie and Bryce hung them around the top of their walls like a border and put pictures they cut out of soccer magazines under the scarves to show who was on what team. And that's another great gift to consider, soccer magazine subscriptions. These can run $20 to $50 for a year. Players who want to be serious about the game should be reading up on the sport on a regular basis. Some titles are soccer specific such as Soccer America, Four Four Two, Fair Game (women's soccer) and Soccer Times while others are general sports magazines such as ESPN which always has a great soccer section. 

With the World Cup next summer in South Africa, World Cup themed gear has erupted. Every kid wants the official World Cup ball which is $150 and is sure to be lost or stolen in the first practice. Or for $25 to $40 you can get a replica World Cup ball which will also probably disappear, but with a smaller blow to the wallet. Few of us can attend the World Cup, but we can all attend live soccer games. So consider getting tickets to MLS games, MISL games, college games, or even high school games. I can guarantee that there is live soccer within an hour of 80% of American families. Support your local college or junior college teams by attending a game or two or becoming a season ticket sponsor. Usually players on these teams are fairly accessible to spectators and the teams are always looking for volunteer ball boys and girls. Going to a local soccer game can be cheaper and more entertaining than going to a movie. So look around for an opportunity to buy some tickets as gifts.

I don't endorse any particular Web site for finding these gifts. Most can be located using a simple browser search engine and typing in "soccer gifts" or even specific items such as "World Cup ball." I do suggest that you also locate promotional codes for the website you land on by searching "promo codes" on the web since many venues offer free shipping or 10% off using one of the codes. With some creativity and some bargain hunting, you can pick up great soccer gifts for your players and fans without falling back on the expensive standbys such as official jerseys and warm-ups. However, if you want the ultimate gift for your player, consider having a large, even life-sized wall clinger poster for up to $200 made from a high-resolution photo of your son or daughter. Several online businesses and even your local photographer offer this option. If you can afford it, this would be a memorable and personal gift for the holidays.
 

Lost in Translation

Susan Boyd

Watching my grandson's soccer game last week I was reminded that even when we think kids aren't listening, they really are, it's just that they don't understand us. But they try, because they want to please us. The following results come from some of the most confusing and therefore entertaining vignettes of my journey through youth soccer.
  • A U-6 coach attempted to exhort his tiny players to get more energy into the game. "Come on. Pick it up you guys." With some confusion the team paused to consider this instruction. "What are you stopping for? I said pick it up." With a shrug of his shoulders, one player ran over to the ball rolling across the field, and picked it up.
  • At an indoor game the teams were 3v3 using the smaller Pugg goals. When the players came out for the second half, we noticed that the team on the near side only had two players on the field. The coach started to laugh, walked over to the goal and pulled the third player out of the far back edges of the Pugg. "But you told me to get in goal," the frustrated five year old shouted.
  • During a particularly combative U-10 game, the coach of one team was continually barking instructions to his players. One girl seemed frozen unable to respond to the increasingly strident orders from her coach. Finally, on the verge of tears she turned to him, "What do you mean goal side? Which side of the goal?"
  • In a post game dissection, the coach, trying to explain passing, asked if anyone could do a cross. A player popped up his hand. "I can do that. We do it before we pray."
  • Once when Robbie was playing in a 3v3 tournament he got the ball and began to dribble down the field. I cheered, or so I thought, "Go Robbie go!" He stopped immediately. Stomping his foot, he yelled right at me "I'm running as fast as I can."
  • When Bryce was eight he used to run behind the goal during defensive plays. It took us a couple weeks to piece it all together. The coach told him to defend the far post. 
  • Innovation saved the day when a U-8 girl was admonished several times during the game to "mark her man." First of all it was a girls' game and second of all she had nothing to write with. After the fourth or fifth insistence a light bulb went on. She picked up some dirt, ran over to the sidelines, rubbed it on her father, and then looked proudly to her coach.
  • Another coach explaining defensive midfield to his young player was telling him that he needed to move up during offense and then run back during defense. Unfortunately he said, "I need you to straddle both lanes." A bowling reference in a soccer pep talk just doesn't cut it.
We parents all too often forget that what we know about the world we learned through decades of experience. What seems abundantly clear to us comes across as confusing and occasionally ridiculous to our half-pint players. Bless them for wanting to do the right thing, so we need to just enjoy the ride. It may be a cliché, but it's true: they are young for such a short time. Let them invent their world.  What they discover can be more fun to experience with them than what we try so hard to teach them. Their fresh minds can translate life into adventure.