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Parents Blog

Susan Boyd blogs on USYouthSoccer.org every Monday.  A dedicated mother and wife, Susan offers a truly unique perspective into the world of a "Soccer Mom". 

 

The Power of Hate

Susan Boyd

News exploded with the fireworks of bigotry last week. Somehow, the recorded private conversation of wealthy landlord Donald Sterling with his 49-years-younger mistress got released to the media, revealing some very distasteful, ugly and intolerant vitriol. I don’t know if it was the salacious nature of the primary actors’ relationship, the wealth of the bigot, the fact he owns the L.A. Clippers, or the actual atrocious dialog that earned it world-wide attention, but attention it got. I have a theory. Very few were surprised by Sterling’s prejudice, but it had been ignored for years. These tapes, revealed in the middle of the NBA playoffs — when teams earn the bulk of their income — jeopardized the economy of the league. Players were threatening to boycott the games, sponsors were pulling their money, and fans were protesting. Adam Silver, the first-year NBA Commissioner, had no choice given two facts: Sterling admitted the tapes were authentic and the financial bleeding needed a tourniquet. He issued a quick, decisive response banning Donald Sterling for life and urging the other team owners to vote that he divest himself of the team. Of course, selling his team will make him a tidy profit of $580 to $780 million minus the $2.5 million fine he has to pay for his remarks. So the pain of his ban will be mitigated by his expanding bank account.               

This underbelly of bigotry that exists in our society is often overlooked, denied or excused. I would argue those who ignore it are just as complicit as those who speak it. And when both actors have the power to not just exercise free speech but to use that speech to put into place policies that suppress the rights, progress and freedoms of others based on their race, religion, sexual orientation or disability, then bigotry morphs into real racism (or any of the other appropriate –isms). Merriam-Webster defines it as poor treatment of or violence against people because of their race, a definition which goes beyond just thinking people of another race are inferior to your own. Donald Sterling has power to put his viewpoints into practice, which he has shown over the last eight years. In 2006, he was sued for discriminatory housing practices in his rental properties and settled in 2007 by paying out $2.77 million in fines. This was public record and reported in the news, so the NBA can’t say they didn’t know with whom they were dealing. In 2006, ESPN reporter Bomani Jones wrote an article titled, “Donald Sterling’s Racism Should Be News.” Jones’ point was that people focus on the wrong thing. While the opinions Sterling expressed are repugnant, they are merely opinions, which is probably why everyone turned a deaf ear. However, Jones stressed that Sterling has the power to put his opinions into action. He has been in a position to deny decent housing to Blacks, Latinos and families with children. The power to block housing for minority families prevents them from living in neighborhoods with good schools, safety and pride. Forced to take lesser options, these families are held back from opportunities in which they have the economic ability, but not the freedom, to enjoy. The old argument of “there goes the neighborhood” taints the efforts of families to improve their circumstances, and Donald Sterling has the power to insure that continues.              

By brushing aside Sterling as merely a socially ignorant man, the NBA also allowed Sterling to exercise his bigoted power in the league. Evidence that his policies hurt people associated with the team can be found in the number of staff that quit, unable to work under his vitriolic points of view, the players who operated under a cloud of prejudice and disrespect, and in Elgin Baylor, the 22-year general manager of the Clippers, who filed suit in 2009 against Sterling for discrimination and wrongful termination on the basis of age and race. He lost the case in 2011. The racial discrimination portion of the case was dropped prior to it going to court. Nevertheless, Baylor said during the trial that Sterling embraced "a Southern plantation-type structure" (supported by Sterling’s own words in the tapes – “I support [the players] and give them food, and clothes, and cars, and houses.” — a stance slave owners took to show their “benevolence”). Allegations of racism were levied against Sterling in the trial, many involving former Clippers players. Putting it all in context, there are certain conclusions that can be drawn. In 2008-09, the team went 19-63, so Sterling’s team was no threat to the economics of the NBA. There was no reason to act. As long as everything that happened within the league was quiet and unobtrusive, the NBA wouldn’t rock the boat. However, the “morals clause” of Article 35(A), titled, “Misconduct of Persons other than Players” subsection (d) allows the Commissioner to suspend or fine an owner for being found guilty of conduct prejudicial or detrimental to the NBA existed then as did Sterling’s overt and verbal racism. The only thing that has changed is that this recent audio revelation comes during the playoffs, when teams make the bulk of their income, and sponsors were pulling out rapidly. “Doing the right thing” was probably as much driven by economics as by honor. That makes the NBA a partner in how the offensive behaviors grew and ultimately exploded. Had they put Donald Sterling’s feet to the fire in 2007, his behavior would have been addressed without possibly the grave consequences both for the league and for Sterling that ensued last week. Even more importantly, the league would have taken a strong public stance against racism expressed both inside and outside the NBA — showing that intolerance would never be tolerated. That message would have been far more powerful than anything implemented recently when, frankly, the commissioner really had no other choice. Rather than an act of standing up against racism, this was more an act of bending to pressure.               

For our children, I’m happy that justice was meted out to this man for his attitudes that reflect badly on the sport he represents. Our kids need to see that in this era of quick, knee-jerk Twitter, Instagram and Facebook comments, words have the power to hurt and the power to destroy. Kids who express hate-filled language need to experience consequences just as they would for physical actions. People who recite, “Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me” as a deflection from their actions have probably never experienced the unrelenting barrage of prejudice that so many of our young people endure day in and day out, targeting their race, religion, appearance, sexual preferences, disabilities and even gender. Like verbal water torture, the constant drip, drip, drip of words pierce our children’s self-esteem, sense of safety and happiness. Unfortunately, unless a kid snaps and uses a real weapon to heap physical retaliation on the word warriors, this problem gets little attention.              

My sons are African-American and Hispanic. They constantly face some type of prejudice or disrespect for their race. It can be as subtle as being ignored when in line to pay for something or as overt as hate language spewed at them. Something as simple as marking their race in official forms can’t be completed because, although being born to an African-American father and a Latina mother, there is no box for 50/50, an insult to their pride in being representative of two minorities. In middle school, Robbie was subjected to a daily rant on his bus ride to and from school from a kid calling him every hateful racial slur in the book. This went on for more than a year despite repeated complaints to the principal. One day, in the locker room after his physical education class, this kid’s shoe was resting in front of Robbie, so he asked him to give it to him with the phrase, “Hey N…., give me my shoe.” Robbie obliged by throwing it at him and they ended up wrestling on the locker room floor. For this episode, Robbie got suspended for two days and the kid got no punishment. In a conversation with the principal, he explained that Robbie started it by throwing the shoe, and that “I love black people. I have black friends. This has nothing to do with Robbie being black.” Only he was wrong. It had everything to do with Robbie’s race and with this kid’s unfettered autonomy to constantly denigrate Robbie’s race. I never advocate physical retaliation, but I also don’t condone tacitly supporting hate speech by ignoring it. Both boys deserved suspensions.            

On the field, our sons have been verbally assaulted by players using the boys’ race as a way to provoke them. We have always told the boys that people love to latch onto what they perceive to be the warts of others, so our sons can’t use race as an excuse for failure. Still, suffering the racial barbs flung at them, rarely as Nietzsche would argue, make them stronger. It’s just a beat down on their psychological well-being. Hate language is too often the armor with which people enter the battle of life, hoping to deflect criticism from themselves by dishing it out first. What really gets my blood boiling is not just that players and fans use bigotry to make a point, but that they aren’t called out for it. Those of us not directly affected by that type of language don’t have the empathy to understand how overwhelmingly defeating it can be. Imagine that someone angrily and publicly belittles you for something in your appearance. If you woke up every morning knowing you were going to regularly hear “What a fat cow you are,” “Hey big nose,” or “No one can see you, you little shrimp,” you’d cringe going out in public. Language can wound us deeply.           

While I’m glad Donald Sterling got caught and reprimanded for his opinions, parents need to understand that his behavior is only the tiniest sliver of the tip of a giant iceberg. If we just focus on professional sports, here’s a taste of what has happened in the recent past. During a game last week between Villarreal and Barcelona, the latter’s Brazilian defender, Dani Alves, who is black, got pelted by a banana thrown by a Villarreal youth club coach. Wayne Simmonds, an African-American player for the Philadelphia Flyers hockey team, also had a banana thrown at him during a game in London, Ontario and during the 2012 lockout when NHL players went to Europe to play he had racial taunts aimed at him by fans in the Czech Republic. Jonathan Martin resigned from the Miami Dolphins after an unrelenting harassment of racially charged texts from teammate Richie Incognito. The fan club of the Zenit St. Petersburg (Russia) soccer team has demanded that there be no black or gay players on the team while disturbingly the managers remain silent in rebuking their requests.             

When it comes to our children, prejudice in the hands of powerful people can have similar effects on a smaller scale. If bigoted coaches won’t give players field time, or silently tolerate prejudicially charged comments from teammates, opponents and parents, or express prejudice themselves, they have the power to take away the dreams and joy of players. They also condone an environment where our children believe hate language to be acceptable. As parents who don’t want our children to be either victims or abusers, we need to call the purveyors of hate talk to task. Robbie’s college soccer coach was eventually fired for his continued racial slurs, but it took months of documentation, protest and several players quitting the team, including Robbie, before the athletic director took action. Even then, the school argued that his firing was for NCAA violations and not for his hate speech. Why are we so afraid to confront prejudice and to punish those in positions of power who exercise it? While every accused person deserves a fair chance to defend themselves against charges of discrimination, that moment of defense should come with the first complaints, not months or even years later. And every charge should be investigated and taken seriously.          

The positive of the Sterling incident is that it forced a public discussion about prejudice. I know plenty of bigots, and I do my best to address their opinions. But anyone who has the power to act on their bigotry carries a bigger, scarier stick. The very definition of a racist is someone who has the power to subjugate another due to their race. Donald Sterling fits that description and actually has used his intolerance as a weapon. But I would also argue that the NBA likewise borders on racism by tolerating his behavior for at least eight years and quietly sweeping it under the carpet. They allowed Sterling to exercise his viewpoint in the running of his team and to represent the NBA in his public dealings. If nothing else, by speaking up, parents will show our children how to handle bigotry. That’s the lesson I hope comes from this event — when we tolerate hate speech we empower the speaker.

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Keeping the Lid on Costs

Susan Boyd

Recently, my oldest son announced he needed new cleats. As he put it: “Nothing special. Certainly, not top of the line. I just need cleats that don’t rip apart.” He said this right before he informed me cleats fitting those three categories apparently cost $220 to $270. Yeah, right. When I went online and looked, I discovered plenty of cleats in the $70 to $150 range, so I wondered how the ones he touted weren’t “top of the line.” He had no response other than to say he needed the right weight and durability and, of course, the right colors. I had run into the technology wall. Soccer equipment, which used to be serviceable boots and something round to kick, has now moved into the realm of super-scientifically designed gear. Cleats have become an impressive selection of incredibly lightweight, colorful, streamlined and transitory purchases. New car models have nothing on new shoe models. How do parents fight our children’s urge to gravitate to the shiniest and therefore most expensive baubles in the soccer shop?              

Sports products are driven by the professional athletes in the sport. Whatever high-end equipment the superstars use immediately floods the stores, fulfilling the dreams of thousands of youth fans. If Ronaldo runs faster in 3-ounce shoes, then every kid believes he or she will also run faster. Boots in radiant color schemes that light up the pitch in a UEFA Champions League game continue their siren call from the shelves of the local soccer shop. Soccer balls that promise straighter passes and elegant bends serve up rapid sales. Team jerseys, practice shirts, and warm-ups run two to five times the cost of regular soccer clothing. Throw in scarves, pennants, posters, t-shirts, and training DVDS and books to create a black hole of expense for the soccer family. Finding the happy medium can prove elusive, especially when one kid on the team shows up in the most expensive cleats. Just like we all stop and gape as a bright yellow Lamborghini purrs by, kids do the same for top-of-the-line soccer gear. We end up not only trying to keep up with the Joneses, but also with the junior Messis, Wambachs, Beckhams and Drogbas. We are fighting a tide of trendiness.              

First of all, very few players need specialized gear other than for the cool factor. While light-weight cleats are great for giving an extra split-second of speed, they also offer less foot stability and support. Youth players with their developing bones and muscles don’t have the physical strengths to make effective, safe use of such specifically designed gear. While they may have faster feet, they may also end up with Achilles’ tendon strains, ankle sprains, calf and shin cramps, and arch collapses due to inappropriate equipment for their developmental level. The damage can extend to other joints, especially knees, as the body tries to compensate for inadequate support at foot level. Luckily the major companies, such as Nike and adidas, have recognized the twinkling lure of the professional gear and create various levels of the same gear with slight exterior design tweaks on the proper “chassis” for a child’s feet. Kids will recognize the design differences, but when parents appear willing to spring for a less fancy model that at least mimics the higher-end prototype, they will often be happy to concur. Ask at the soccer shop or run a search online for these kid and budget friendlier products. Ultimately cost and safety should take the front seat in making your selection. Discuss with your kids the possibility that injuries, even soccer ending injuries, could result from making the wrong choice of cleats. Most kids will understand and happily accept a small change in design to get a pair of the cooler cleats rather than the pragmatic basic black brand.             

The older the player, the tougher that argument is to win. The good news is that teen players usually have stopped growing, or at least growing rapidly, so that a pair of shoes can fit one or two seasons. Your budget may allow for a more expensive model but not for all the sparkling options that assault players entering the soccer or sports store. You can put the responsibility on your child. Offer the mid-priced option, but agree that if your child wants to spring for the difference in price between that and the top-of-the-line model, then that would be a possibility. I found my sons, when faced with that choice, let me pay for the mid-price and kept their money. Coolness had a price they let me sacrifice for, but not themselves. Older players also can work to earn some of these treats. State Associations are always looking for referees. The flexibility of officiating games when the player’s schedule allows makes this a great job for soccer kids. Many clubs will pay their players to mow and line fields, run concession stands and clean public areas, including bathrooms. Again, these jobs offer some flexibility. Getting a job with a store like Sports Authority not only provides a pay check, but also gives the employee a steep discount on store merchandise. So that’s a great way for a player to stock up on the elite equipment they crave.             

Team jerseys rarely come with a discount. They can cost $120 to $200. This is the time to alert grandparents to the wish list. They can purchase gift certificates to major distributors and online soccer sites for special occasions like birthdays and graduations. There are off-brand replica possibilities for several teams, but rarely for Premier League teams and players. Online auction sites might offer jerseys, albeit discontinued styles, for a bargain. The same holds true for warm-ups. These specialized jerseys shouldn’t be impulse buys. Also consider less expensive official team training jerseys. They aren’t as fancy but come in all the team colors and designs. They can run as low as $50, a much more palatable price for a young family. Saving these purchases, which aren’t necessary to play the game, for significant moments will make them more meaningful and let our kids know that focusing on their development is the important point of spending money. However, I will agree that kids find validation in their sports’ choices by identifying with particular teams and players. Since soccer’s popularity is still evolving in America, finding those factors that make a kid feel proud are important. The cheapest way to do that is by supporting them at their games, attending high school, college and professional games as a family, and watching games on TV. Creating the bonds between parent and child also creates the pride in the sport and the child’s participation in the sport.          

Soccer balls make me crazy. First of all, hundreds of thousands of skillful players grew up kicking a can, a melon, a threadbare ball or a piece of wood. So paying over $50 for any soccer ball seems ridiculously extravagant. Then I’ll ask you how many soccer balls your child has lost over the years? I bought a 2006 World Cup ball for nearly $200 for my boys with strict orders it was not to be used for practice. One week later it was lost in the canal behind the Marquette University fields because they brought it to US Youth Soccer ODP practice. UGH! Unless you are in the business of collecting sports memorabilia, there’s no need for such fancy expensive balls. I have found great balls for $3 at Goodwill and kept a huge supply in the trunk for practices and games. Often these balls were selected as the game ball because they were actually quite good. Invest in two good pumps — one for the garage and one for the trunk — and then three or four inexpensive balls. Kids can claim a fancy ball, but when it comes down to it, balls become communal once they hit the pitch, so there’s no need to help a teammate go home with your expensive treasure. Occasionally, high schools and colleges may sell or give away their old balls, so that’s worth a phone call to the appropriate athletic directors.      

Today, I’m addressing the issue of my son’s shoes the way I always have. I set a budget and if he wants to go over it, then that’s up to him. I did the research, and, for half the price, I found the same shoes just a half ounce heavier with a slightly different color scheme. He’s trying to save for a car and the insurance to cover it, so having flashy cleats will steal away from having a serviceable car. We’ll see what he opts to do. When all else fails, I return to the speech he hates, but knows is true. I put 10 pennies on the table which each represent $100. Then we look at choices he has to make every day with his limited budget. It’s a tangible representation of the budget none of us want to acknowledge constrains us. A lot of pennies skittered off to the side for rent, car payment, car insurance and food — leaving just one to represent anything vaguely “disposable income,” a term I scoff at. I feel like all we do in the year is dispose of our income and rarely for something fun and extra. That remaining penny also had to cover any emergency and any savings. Looking at the pile of pennies at first seems comforting and sufficient; pulling them out one by one shows how transient his finances actually are. He hates the penny demo, but he also appreciates how it reminds him to stay focused on what is really important. I’m hoping cleats with the coolest gradations of orange are less important in the grand scheme of things.

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Get Organized

Susan Boyd

Every spring, I reevaluate my organizational needs for soccer. Manufacturers recognize how important tidiness is for active families juggling kids with lots of activities. I’m always amazed and pleased to see what new products come available that can smooth out the chaos of getting ready for soccer and traveling to practices, games, and tournaments. Helping me out is the latest issue of Real Simple magazine, which is devoted entirely to organization. I discovered several great ideas that should help everyone out and then sprinkled in a few of the hints I’ve found that work for me or for my friends.            

The best hint I got from Real Simple was a mom who used EnviroSax to keep her kids organized. You can certainly use any sack you want, but I personally own a dozen of these huge “sacs” that I have used for three years to carry groceries, clothing and firewood, along with scores of other usages and all I need to do is throw the bags in the washer and they come out good as new. This mom provides each of her children a bag for each of their activities. She attaches a luggage tag to the bag with the child’s name on one side with the activity (i.e. Billy - soccer) and on the other side she lists all the items necessary to participate in the activity (i.e. cleats, jersey, shorts, socks, shin guards etc.) That way she can look quickly at the list and the items in the bag, replenishing what needs to be added. It also makes it easy for babysitters, grandparents and neighbors to help out without her having to print out instructions. The idea is so simple I’m surprised I didn’t come across it sooner. But I think it’s a brilliant way to keep things all orderly and complete. EnviroSax sell for around $8 for one sack or $35 for five sacks. There’s even a Sesame Street set. They come in a small carry bag and roll up to just a tiny percentage of their full size. Luggage tags can be found on Zazzle.com with thousands of options in just about any price range.           

A second wonderful suggestion from a mom is a product called Cocoon Grid It. This comes in a variety of sizes and is essentially a flat board covered in heavy-duty nylon. On one side there are dozens of interwoven elastic straps, which will hold all those items in your purse, backpack or soccer bag that fall down to the bottom and get lost. You can put things in it like charging cords for your phone, the phone, Chap Stick, headphones, pens, pencils, extra keys, shoelaces, sunscreen, any little things you carry with you. Once you get the items stuck into the straps, you can then slide the entire Cocoon into your purse, backpack, car seat pocket or bag. Then, just pull the entire board out to retrieve what you want when you want it. The prices range from 7x 9 inches for $15 to 8x10 inches for $18 to 9.5x15 inches for $25 from CocoonInnovations.com and come in a variety of colors. These boards seem to be a great, inexpensive solution to the tiny clutter we all accumulate when we travel and have kids. You could fill these with arts and crafts to slide into car seat pockets.             

I recommend getting everything organized before the season starts into what I have termed “the soccer box.” You can get as big a box as you need, either a cardboard one or a specialty one to fit whatever you feel you will use at most soccer games. I suggest towels (to wipe down bleacher seats after rain or to dry off hair), blankets, toilet paper, paper towels, bug spray, sunscreen, extra gloves and hats, several bottles of water, extra t-shirts (light and dark) in case someone forgets their jersey, extra socks (there is nothing worse than playing several games in wet socks), flashlight, paper and pen, and I’ve even thrown a calculator in there, although now with smart phones you probably don’t need it. Just think about what you used or wish you had last season and throw that in the box. There’s a three compartment trunk organizer from Picnic at Ascot that holds tons of those soccer box needs like first aid kits, extra clothing, tire pumps and toilet paper (trust me this is a must to have along for the ride!). Amazon.com offers the organizer, which also includes a removable cooler, for $46.75. The entire product collapses if you want to create more trunk space, but in my experience once you fill it up, you’ll never empty it. Along that line you might want to get a car emergency kit that includes battery cables, aerosol tire refill, ice scraper, and shammy cloths. AAA has a great kit with flashlight, batteries, booster cables, first aid kit, poncho, duct tape, fuses and cloths for $25, which Amazon sells for $19.50.              

My top suggestion is to keep a roll of large 33 gallon trash bags and 13 gallon kitchen bags to deal with all the clothing and shoes covered in mud, grass, turf chips and rain. Throw the large bags on the floor of your car to protect against those muddy cleats. Use the kitchen bags to hold rain and mud-soaked uniforms without letting out the stench and the stains on your upholstery. I’ve used them for over a decade and found them to be the best solution for protecting the car’s interior, not to mention the passengers’ sense of smell. I’ve hosed down the large trash bags and reused them. I know there are those WeatherTech liners, but they run about $100 and the garbage bags are less than $20. Not nearly as attractive, but you remove them when not needed.             

The one thing that seems to get out of hand quickly in the truck are those soccer chairs. Once a game is over, few of us want to spend the time shoving the chair back in its travel bag, or we end up losing those. The stack of chairs tend to collapse and are hard to keep contained in a small area. A 30x50-inch military duffle bag will hold four or five chairs easily, keeping them tightly packed in one place. The bag is canvas, so very sturdy and only costs $25 at Militaryuniformsupply.com. There are smaller bags, but the large one leaves room to stuff in some blankets. The duffle bag has two shoulder straps to allow you to carry all your chairs at once to the fields. There is an option for $55, which has wheels should you feel so inclined, but is smaller, so less versatile.            

Traveling to tournaments, especially if you are the team parent, can mean tons of paperwork that never seems to stay organized and the pages you need get shuffled around and lost. Obviously, a three-ring binder would help. Beyond that, I got a great hint from a friend. She prints the various paperwork on different colored paper, depending on the purpose. So, for example, the hotel confirmations are printed on pink, the rental car on green, the airline itinerary on yellow, etc. Although you could invest in tabs, you still have to sort through to find the right tab. The different colored paper is a quick visual cue that can be readily detected. If something gets out of order you’ll be able to see that immediately. I found this a wonderful way to keep things straight.              

I don’t know if it happens to you, but my sons managed to see one cleat or one shin guard in their bags and assume both were in there, only to make the disturbing discovery that in fact there was only one when they arrived at the fields. I found that large office loose-leaf rings are a great way to keep items in pairs. You can thread the ring through cleat shoelace eyelets or through the shin guards. You can even use them to clip all the uniform pieces together by slipping the ring through the jersey and shorts. Chip bag clips can be used to hold the socks or goalkeeper gloves together. One friend uses her daughter’s hair clips for the same purpose. I don’t like putting things in zip bags because all too often one item is “used” and the moisture and smell just cultivate in the bags. However, there are small mesh laundry bags that breathe and can be used for gathering items together. Ikea sells these as bags to put delicates in the washer and come in packs of three for $9. The advantage of the bags is that you can put the soiled wet socks in one and the uniforms in another and then just throw them in the washer when you get home. They are also great for gently washing gloves, shin guards and knee pads.              

Keeping the garage organized can be the final frontier in maintaining your soccer sanity. Kids love to shove their bags into any open space on the garage floor, leaving us to trip over them. There are three simple ways to get these organized. You can use the “J” hooks sold to hang bicycles as a place to hang the bags. You decide where to put them, tag them for each kid, and ask them to hoist their bags on the hooks once they have cleaned out what they need washed. There is also a bike hanging pole you can install that serves the same purpose but they usually run $65 to $100. However, if you have limited space, the pole will keep all the soccer bags in one corner of the garage without robbing lots of space.  There are also sports equipment organizing racks for around $45, but in my experience they aren’t big enough to handle large soccer bags, especially more than one. I really advocate for the hooks which are inexpensive and easy to install. Our driveway is inclined and loose balls in the garage invariably roll into the courtyard across the street.  Rubbermaid makes a vertical ball storage rack called The Fast Track that sells for $22 on Amazon. It’s a metal cage tube with two bungee bands in the front. You simply push the balls through the elastic into the wire cage which holds up to five balls. You can also invest in a portable basketball rack with three shelves that hold a total of 12 balls. It costs $74 from Martin Sports and takes up some floor space, whereas the Rubbermaid rack hangs on the wall. Any over-the-door shoe rack hung on the garage side of the back door can keep those soccer cleats off the floor, airing out, and readily accessible. The rack also encourages kids to remove the cleats before entering the house.            

Anything we can do to minimize the disorder that comes with kids in multiple activities, each with its own set of equipment and clothing needs, means snatching extra sanity for our days. If you find you have a particular organizational dilemma, ask fellow parents how they handle it. Necessity is the mother of invention, and parents have lots of necessity to be inventive. Most solutions run under $25, so you can stay in budget while staying uncluttered. The more we get organized, the more we find our stress reduced. When we arrive at the fields relatively stress-free we can enjoy the game better and our kids will be happier. It’s all about finding the method to reduce the madness.

 

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Reading List

Susan Boyd

Each year, I try to touch on some of the great soccer books I’ve come across. Being inspired by the words and stories of players, coaches and parents can be just the boost young players and their families need to make a renewed investment in playing. The soccer-based book and magazine library is huge, not only because the sport has a world-wide audience, but because it is rising in popularity in America. These volumes generate suitable gifts, books to read aloud before bedtime, opportunities to motivate your young player, educational sources, and just good reading. I’ll divide this list up for readers under 6, aged 6-12, teens and adults.              

Young girls know the “Maisy” series, a colorful set of stories starring a mouse and her friends. On May 14 a new book comes out titled, “Maisy Plays Soccer,” by Lucy Cousins. This can be a read-aloud book or a first reader. “My First Soccer Game: A Fold-out Book,” by Capucilli and Jensen, is a photography book with big 18x18-inch fold-out pages featuring detailed photos of various exercises and team tactics for new youth players. It’s a great book for beginners to be able to visualize all that gibberish they hear at practice! If kids want to learn about the history of the game and the records produced over the years, "Cool Soccer Facts” by Abby Czeskleba dishes up the info. For kids who may not be great players yet, but have the imagination and drive to try for the stars, “Soccer Crazy” is for them. Colin McNaughton wrote the book in 1978 but recently revised it to address some of the recent advances in the sport. The School Library Review listed this as a top read.           

When kids get going in the sport and begin to move up the soccer experience ladder, they face plenty of changes. Games move from 4 vs. 4 to 8 vs. 8 to finally 11 vs. 11, and each step has its own set of rules and learning curves. So, before they become teens they have to adjust to all the growth in their team size, ability and rules, not to mention dealing with their own growth spurts or slow development — making each step a challenge. These are really formative years in acquiring the skills and maturity to shift into high school soccer. There are plenty of books to help with that transition, which also have tremendous formats. Giving a broad perspective on youth development, “Kids Book of Soccer: Skills, Strategies, and the Rules of the Game,” by Brooks Clark, can be read by most kids 9 and older, and can be shared by parents with younger kids. It breaks down the sport into its important aspects and the changes the game goes through as kids get older. If you know DK Eyewitness books, you know how beautifully designed they are with sharp photos, lots of facts and special information. “Soccer,” by Hugh Hornby, was revised for the 2010 World Cup and may have a new revision for this summer’s contest. This is a book kids can return to time and time again with fresh eyes and new discoveries. Speaking of the World Cup, watching the event together as a family can strengthen a passion for the game and provide your child with the validation of his sports choice. “The Official 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil Kids’ Handbook” provides lots of information on the teams and players participating, as well as the brackets, participating countries’ details, rules and facilities. The book can serve as a resource to answer questions during the competitions and to get kids involved in the excitement the world experiences every four years. US Youth Soccer publishes FUEL magazine for youth players with lots of great articles. You can get it digitally or you can order a box of at least 120 issues for $50 to distribute amongst your club. The magazine covers health, training, adventures and player biographies. Boys really enjoy Matt Christopher books, including “Soccer Scoop,” “Soccer Hero,” and “Soccer Duel.” Girls would enjoy Jake Maddox books, including “Soccer Surprise” and “Soccer Show-off.” He also has soccer books for boys. A rich resource book for tweens will be coming out May 27 titled “National Geographic Kids Everything Soccer,” by Blake Hoena, which has all the great behind-the-scenes photos that National Geographic is famous for.           

Once kids hit their teens and more importantly high school, they not only can get a bit jaded by soccer stories, but also have limited time to sit and read anything other than assigned material. So whatever you choose for them has to be really engaging. I think the best product is Four Four Two magazine out of the UK. This and World Soccer are the two most widely read and respected soccer publications on the market. When I gave this to my sons for a Christmas gift, it was nearly as well-received as if I had given them a car (I did say “nearly”). It comes out monthly, weighs about 2 pounds, and therefore is chockfull of information. It does have an English bias, but still covers the world of soccer, including some MLS news. One of the big factors separating great players from good players isn’t necessarily athleticism but the mental game. Older players recognize that mental edge in their favorite stars. Therefore, “Soccer Tough:  Simple Football Psychology Techniques to Improve Your Game,” by Dan Abrahams, should be one of the books passionate older youth players would appreciate. A great resource book for players to learn about the game is “World Soccer Records 2014” by Keir Radnadge. This book puts the game into perspective, showing players how powerful and amazing soccer can be and where they should be aiming to improve their skills. Upping their game means being a great defender or striker. To that end, “44 Secrets for Great Soccer Goal Scoring Skills,” by Mirsad Hasic; “The Complete Soccer Goalkeeper,” by Mulqueen and Woitalla; and “Master the Game: Soccer Defender,” by Broadbent and Allen, along with “Conditioning for Soccer,” by Raymond Verheijen, are good reads to give them a fitness edge. Coaches will tell you that many soccer games are won not by the most skilled team, but by the fittest.            

I just picked up Pele’s newest book, “Why Soccer Matters,” which he wrote to celebrate the sport and the return of the World Cup to Brazil after more than 60 years. I’ve not read much of it, but it is definitely inspiring — making it appropriate for adults and older players. We are all getting better informed about how soccer is played even though many of us don’t come from a soccer background of playing and watching the game. So it can be embarrassing if parents on the sidelines don’t know the rules, which “Official Soccer Rules Illustrated,” by Stanley Lover, helps improve. One of our main jobs as a parent is to provide snacks for our kids after practices and games, so learning how to find nutritious, inexpensive and delicious treats, which also avoid common kids’ allergies, can be daunting. “Food Guide for Soccer: Tips and Recipes from the Pros,” by Averbuch and Clark, details not only healthy snacks but ways of making sure our kids eat healthy all the time. The book focuses especially on developing steady energy throughout the day by utilizing the right foods. As parents, we always dream of our kids playing college soccer. Remember to be careful what you wish for since the NCAA really limits the number of full-ride scholarships in soccer, meaning most, if not all players, earn only a small percentage of the total cost of attending a college in the form of an athletic scholarship, as these are spread out over the entire team. Players and parents should focus more on the experience than the funds. Several good books help with the process. “Get Recruited to Play Women’s College Soccer,” by Lucia Bucklin, was published in late December 2013, so it is up to date enough to offer good advice. There is no specific book out there for men’s college soccer recruiting but there is a recent book on athletic recruiting, “Get Recruited to Play College Athletics,” by S. Farrell, which is two years old. Remember too that there are other college organizations out there besides the NCAA. Learning from someone who has been there, done that can make the entire process of being a soccer parent not only more enjoyable but also more informed. Dan Woog has had a front seat to youth soccer for years both with recreational and select teams. He has been a coach, a spectator, a state hall of fame inductee, and an important voice for youth players as a writer. His book, “We Kick Balls:  True Stories from the Youth Soccer Wars,” touches on both humorous and serious issues affecting youth players on and off the field, including the thornier ones such as drugs, bullying, prejudice and sexual orientation. The book may have some uncomfortable sections, but as parents we can’t live in the world with blinders on avoiding these truths. I recommend it as a significant eye witness account of the life our kids have chosen.            

The old caveat of “Reading is Fundamental” holds true in all of our lives, even in our soccer lives.  Hopefully some of these texts can be not only useful but also enlightening. As we encourage our kids to pursue their dreams and to enjoy the journey, we should also be sharing in that adventure both as supporters and as resources. I challenge parents to share with one another any books or magazines they have found worthwhile. As we join together we become a reading soccer village that raises our children.

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