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Coaches Blog

Sam's Blog is a bi-weekly addition to the US Youth Soccer Blog. Sam Snow is the Coaching Director for US Youth Soccer.

 

Rare Meeting

Sam Snow

It is rare to have such a meeting; well actually it likely never occurs anywhere other than the United States, as occurred last Wednesday. The annual State Technical Directors meeting took place at the 2009 US Youth Soccer adidas Workshop. But this year's meeting was special with the addition of the U.S. Men's National Team head coach, Bob Bradley joining us. Coach Bradley spoke to the State Association Technical Directors on the current status of the U.S. Men's National Team and how the team is performing. A great dialog took place among the coaches as we spoke about player development and international competition. It was clear that many of the challenges club coaches face in developing youth players and improving team performance are also faced by the National Team staff. So no matter what the level of play is there's always room for improvement.
 
We finished off the morning session with reports from the US Youth Soccer Technical Department and the Coaching Committee. The best was yet to come in the afternoon session.
 
Joining the coaches in the afternoon were several state association presidents and executive directors, as well as luminaries from US Youth Soccer and U.S. Soccer. The afternoon meeting began with Larry Monaco, president of US Youth Soccer; Sunil Gulati, president of U.S. Soccer; Jim Cosgrove, executive director of US Youth Soccer; Dan Flynn, general secretary of U.S. Soccer, Bob Bradley, head coach of the US Men's National Team; Kevin Payne, chair of the U.S. Soccer Technical Committee; John Hackworth, Development Academy Technical Director for U.S. Soccer; Jay Berhalter, assistant general secretary of U.S. Soccer; Hugo Perez from the U.S. Soccer staff; Kati Hope, manager of the U. S. Soccer Coaching Department; four of the U.S. Soccer National Staff Coaches; Jeff Tipping, Director of Coaching for the National Soccer Coaches Association of America; Robin Russell, from the UEFA Technical Staff and three US Youth Soccer ODP regional head coaches. It is easily said that almost every real mover and shaker in American soccer was in that room last Wednesday afternoon. So what did we talk about? The national implementation of the recommendations and guidelines in the book Best Practices for Coaching Soccer in the United States. The document is currently available for download or hard copy purchase at http://www.ussoccer.com/articles/viewArticle.jsp_280734.html. Both US Youth Soccer and U. S. Soccer are promoting and urging soccer clubs all across our nation to put into action the Best Practices philosophy! Ultimately, the document helps to organize a body of work originally created by many current and former U.S. Soccer coaches as position statements regarding club soccer or as curriculum for coaching education courses. It serves as a compilation of what U.S. Soccer considers to be an appropriate and responsible approach to developing soccer players.
 
At the core of "Best Practices for Coaching Soccer in the United States" is the belief that there is not just "one way" to teach soccer to players, nor is there just one style of coaching. These player development guidelines highlight that there is a broad spectrum of styles and methods for how everyone experiences the game. Some of these factors come from a player's background, while some of them are a product of a player's own personality.
 
At the youth and junior levels, however, there is a set of fundamental principles that should be considered by anyone coaching soccer. The starting point of these principles is that young soccer players require a certain amount of uninterrupted play, which allows them to experience soccer first hand. These young players should be allowed the opportunity to experiment, and with that, succeed and fail. A coach's long-term goal is to prepare a player to successfully recognize and solve the challenges of a game on his or her own. It is vital that the coach approaches soccer with this in mind.
 
It was clear by the end of our meeting last Wednesday that the coaches and administrators in attendance agreed with the goals and objectives within the Best Practices document. We hope you will join us and do your part to fully implement these principles!