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Coaches Blog

Sam's Blog is a bi-weekly addition to the US Youth Soccer Blog. Sam Snow is the Coaching Director for US Youth Soccer.

 

Team Captain

Sam Snow

Not long ago I was asked about the process of selecting a team captain in youth soccer. The question and comments were this:
 
I have been coaching youth soccer since I was in college back in 1983. I have taken the National Youth Soccer Course, have various other certifications and regularly attend coaching clinics. I have coached several Travel Teams and recreational teams from ages ranging from U6 to U18. I also coached an adult Women's recreation team for six years until two years ago when I stopped coaching. Nevertheless, I am still my town's youth soccer club's vice president. I currently manage my 14 year-old daughter's Travel Team, but I am not the coach. I have a son who plays high school soccer and a younger daughter who plays both U11 Travel and Premiere soccer.
 
In my twenty-seven years of coaching, I have never appointed or had elections for team captains. Instead I have always used a game captain approach beginning around the U11 age group to reward improved play and to give all the children a taste of being a game captain during the season. While I have researched and I understand the utility and benefits of having team Captains at the high school level and above, I firmly believe that it is inappropriate in youth soccer. Recently, my daughter's U11 Travel Coach held elections and appointed two team captains based upon this vote. Her Premier Team does not have Team Captains, but uses a similar game captain approach that I use.
 
All of the parents of the children on the team were very surprised that the coach did this. Indeed, they are all looking to me for direction based on my experience and as the club's vice president on whether to approach the coach about our collective disagreement with the use of Team Captains. I have always also believed that other than when asked by the coach that I do not interfere with a coach's decision unless in my role as a board member to enforce disciplinary action. I am very interested in US Youth Soccer's views on the use of team captains in youth soccer and whether you can direct me to some articles on the subject.
 
US Youth Soccer does not have an official policy on identifying or selecting the team captain or captains. We feel the decision is up to the club to make. If the club does not have a policy in place for the various age groups in the club on the function and selection of captains then the club director of coaching should devise one. From the US Youth Soccer Coaching Department we recommend giving all of the players the opportunity to be the captain at least once per season not just in matches but in training sessions too. That should take place with the U8 to the U14 age groups. The U6 age group does not need team captains in any manner. The U16 and older age groups should have captains voted upon by the players and accredited by the coaching staff. I like these suggestions from Eric McGrath.
 
How to Pick Captains for a Soccer Team
By Eric McGrath, eHow Contributor
 
When looking to create a good team bond from a disparate group of soccer players, it is a good idea for the coach to select good captains in order to maintain discipline in the group, to relay tactical developments during a game, and to keep movement from exercise to exercise as efficient as possible. This article looks at some ideas on selecting the right personnel for this important role in any soccer team.
 
Look within the group for natural leaders. Sometimes these players will lead quietly by example with their behavior and level of play; other times they will be strong vocal personalities. Either way, these personality types will be the most obvious choice for a captaincy.
 
Decide whether the team will have one captain or many captains…
 
Decide whether the captains, if more than one, will be co-captains or a head-captain and a vice-captain. Again, the larger the squad, the more sensible it is to delegate leadership to more than one person. Conversely, for a smaller squad, it probably makes sense to have two co-captains or one head captain and a vice-captain.
 
Observe all possible candidates for captain's roles, and judge them on their presence in the team, the reaction of their teammates towards them, and the methods they use to exert their natural authority on their teammates.
 
Once a decision has been reached, announce the captains at an opportune time when every player is present. Explain the reasons why the specific player or players were chosen, and make sure everyone on the team supports the decision.