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Parents Blog

Susan Boyd blogs on USYouthSoccer.org every Monday.  A dedicated mother and wife, Susan offers a truly unique perspective into the world of a "Soccer Mom". 

 

Defying the Storm

Susan Boyd

I just got my son’s spring soccer schedule. The first game is March 9. If we lived in California, the Southwest or the Southeast, this date would probably be reasonable. But we live in Wisconsin. The average temperature in March is a high of 42 and a low of 23. In Milwaukee we get an average of 8.3 inches of snowfall in March. So the possibility of a snow-covered field with temperatures too low to melt the snow certainly exists. This scenario points out the difficulty of scheduling soccer games, especially in the spring for the vast majority of states. If it’s not snow, it’s cold, rain, lightning, high winds, tornadoes and for some of you: oppressive heat. Inclement weather comes in many forms during the spring.
 
Because clubs need to fit in a certain number of league games — along with tournaments, regional leagues and practices — in an abbreviated amount of time, they are forced to schedule dates which seem impractical. With some good fortune, some of those dates work, but all too often they are merely a precursor to difficult rescheduling efforts. Clubs are loathed to give one another any advantage when the gates of rescheduling are opened. State Youth Soccer Associations govern the original schedule, but once a date proves unplayable, their control over a new date gets weakened. All they can usually enforce is that the date be rescheduled within a certain time period and that the teams both agree to the date. Home field advantage, referee choice, times and days all become negotiable and pawns in trying to gain an upper hand. I used to manage my younger son’s team and had his coach tell me flat out, "We can’t let the other team have their way." Based on how my negotiations with the opposing teams’ managers went, I have to assume that those managers got a similar directive from their coaches. Coaches don’t like games rescheduled on week nights because the players are too tired from school, or if they live a distance away, may have trouble getting to the game on time. Weekends are completely booked with other games and tournaments, and even with daylight savings time, the dark comes quickly, making the window for scheduling later games very small.
 
Therefore, many clubs aren’t easily convinced to cancel a game for inclement weather. At one game in Ft. Wayne, Ind., the opposing team’s parents brought shovels and brooms and all of us hit the field to clear it off as best as possible despite the fact that snow was still falling at a rapid rate. We also spent the game brushing off sidelines and goal boxes whenever the opportunity afforded itself, like the guys who mop off the floor at basketball games. It’s a nearly five-hour drive to Ft. Wayne from Milwaukee, so we all agreed that despite the 28 degrees and snow, we’d get this game in! At a high school state final, lightning delayed the game twice for a total of more than two hours and the field was a complete mud pit, but the game went on. One league game got delayed because referees failed to show and we had to scramble to find officials. By the time we did, dark was approaching, so we moved our cars around the field and lit it with our headlights. 
 
I know that when I look outside and see snow, rain, low temperatures, extremely high temperatures, high winds and/or lightning, I am hopeful the game will be canceled. I don’t want to sit on the sidelines in lousy conditions, and I certainly don’t want to have my child enter my car after getting soaked, covered in mud, and grouchy from being cold and miserable. And if the team lost the game, God help us for the ride home! So I hope for that phone call, but I know I’ll pay for it later when a rescheduled game infringes on some other planned activity or causes us to rush to a distant field after school. So, I have natural approach/avoidance reactions to any possibility of cancellations and rescheduling. 
 
On the other hand, we want our players to be safe and healthy. We definitely need to insist that games stop when lightning approaches and not resume until there is no lightning for 20 minutes. If the field becomes so impassable as to risk injury, then the game has to be stopped. If the problem is high temperatures and/or humidity, we need to insist on water breaks during each half. We have to use good judgment which insures safety. 
 
When a game is going to be played in less-than-ideal conditions, parents must bring extra gear. All too often I see kids playing in below-freezing weather without any protective clothing. They need knit hats, gloves, warm-ups under their uniform and, if possible, some kind of body heat apparel like Under Armour. Bring extra socks, so players can change into dry, warm socks at half-time. There is usually one family that has one of those portable canopies or the team could purchase one together. It can be set up to create shade or rain cover or be leveraged to create a wind protector. Bring blankets that kids can cover up with when sitting on the bench. A tarp on the ground provides a dry surface to set soccer bags, jackets, and even their feet. Don’t forget plastic bags to put wet, muddy uniforms into and bags on your car floor to preserve them from damage. A thermos of hot cocoa would be appreciated by a wind-chapped, freezing player. Hand and foot warmers are cheap products that can help a player not feel quite so miserable. Finally, warm up the car as the game ends so your player can get toasty and dry as soon as possible.
 
Coming from Packers country, we play games in any weather. If it snows, the Packers hire fans to shovel and remove the snow from the stadium seats and aisles. It’s a slick operation, honed by years of practice, with conveyor belts that volunteers throw the snow up on rolling down to the trucks that will remove it. The field is heated, so snow on the field isn’t usually a problem. Unfortunately, youth soccer isn’t so well funded and equipped, but it faces the same weather problems. The main factor for parents is to be flexible and to understand that most climate issues must be overcome to be sure to fit in all the games in the season. So get the gear you need to weather the storms, deck yourself and your player out and try to enjoy to game because as Amelia Barr wrote, "…in joy we face the storm and defy it."
 

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