Check out the weekly blogs

Coaches Connection - Get Connected!

Online education from US Youth Soccer

Clubhouse

Clubhouse Sweepstakes

US Youth Soccer Twitter

Check out the national tournament database

Sports Authority

Marketplace

Wilson Trophy Company

RS Banner

Happy Family

Print Page Share

Parents Blog

Susan Boyd blogs on USYouthSoccer.org every Monday.  A dedicated mother and wife, Susan offers a truly unique perspective into the world of a "Soccer Mom". 

 

Another road trip

Susan Boyd

I'm excited. I get to attend the US Youth Soccer Regional Championship for Region II because Robbie's team won State Cup. I love Regionals. There's pageantry and an expectation that fills the event with energy. I love going to different states to see different soccer fields. It's like having the office over for dinner. You get out the good china, you polish the silver, you clean the house, you buy flowers, and you put on your best outfits. I'm so happy to be on the guest list!

Getting to the championships means working through several rounds of competition. Emerging victorious puts teams in an elite group that only grows more elite the farther up you go. Any young soccer player who aspires to higher levels of soccer will want to play in his or her State Championship and hopefully in Regional and National Championships. Many of the best American players have had the thrill of playing in and even winning these events. It starts with working hard at practice, developing individual and team talent throughout the year, being dedicated to fitness (Robbie hated running 7 miles a day with his team but it paid off), and making some sacrifices along the way. But the result is a week of great competition, fun, and networking. Some of Robbie's and Bryce's soccer friends are kids they met at these events. Players can't help but be impressed by the talent they face and the elevated level of competition required of them.

By the time you read this Region III will be ready to enter its quarterfinals in Baton Rouge, but Region IV will just be getting the first games of the round robin started in Albuquerque, N.M., Region II will kick off on Saturday in Beavercreek, Ohio (a suburb of Dayton), and Region I will begin July 2in Barboursville, W.Va., home to Marshall University. If the event is nearby your hometown, then by all means take a day to see what your Region has to offer and what your own players can aspire to achieve. Schedules are on the various regional websites which can be accessed from http://championships.usyouthsoccer.org/2010_Play_Dates_Regional_and_National_Competitions.asp?. The events will cost you no more than a parking permit and you can then share in all the activities, booths, and viewing the competitions that Regionals offer.

I did check that my hotel has ESPN and ESPN2 so I will miss as little as possible of the World Cup action. But I have to admit that attending the Region II Championship to watch my son and his team play serves as a significant reason to miss a World Cup game!! While each age bracket begins with around 12 to 16 teams, only one will advance to the National Championships. So every game provides the heart-pounding repercussions that a World Cup team faces, only with your own children facing them. The oohs and ahhs that accompany every shot, every save, every pass, and every foul have far more electricity than your same investment in a World Cup game. Thank goodness it's only one game a day, unless you have two or more kids on different teams. There were two years where both boys competed, and I think I owe my grey hair to the stress of two games a day for those three days each year.

I'll have a few more blogs this next week because I'll be at the Region II Championships, and I hope to pass on a bit of the flavor of the event. We'll be driving 400 miles to Dayton, which in and of itself could be a saga since we will be carpooling a number of boys and then I am half of the official chaperones. There will be hotels, trips to and from the fields, discovering things to do for 18 restless boys, and reconnecting with my old haunts in the Dayton area. I am an Ohio girl although I only lived there the first five years of my life. But nearly every relative on my father's side and a fair number on my mother's side filled out a significant percentage of the Ohio census forms. I used to say that you couldn't name a town in Ohio that didn't have one of my relatives living in it. That's less true now as I've gotten older, but I have relatives in some pretty out of the way hamlets as well as the cities. So I'm ready for another road trip. Bring it on!
 

All eyes turn to South Africa

Susan Boyd

Whether or not you love soccer you can't avoid it for the next four weeks. It has taken over the airwaves, the sports news, the evening news, the ticker tapes under programs, and advertising. World Cup fever has infected our house completely. There are no other TV channels available except ESPN and ABC. Four weeks of "GOOOOOOOOOOOOOAL" and heartache. Four weeks of second guessing and hoping. Four weeks of supreme misery and supreme joy. If you love soccer, you've got to love the World Cup which trumps any soap opera with more intensity and intrigue than a crime drama, more entertainment than any comedy, and more international exposure than any history lesson. Usually summer soccer limits itself to camps and tournaments, but every four years there's a larger stage for this sport that has captivated the world and is slowly winning over America one family at a time.

I remember watching my first soccer game in 1965. I don't remember their opponent, but I do remember the Italian National team. Why? Because the players crumpled to the grass on every real or imagined touch to their bodies and writhed in agony until an official suggested they should get up. Miraculously they recovered and often went on to achieve some spectacular steal or score. I thought they were incredible babies. My opinion has changed over time and experience. I still think Italians dissolve more easily than other nations, but I now understand the philosophy and the reasoning behind those breakdowns. In 34 years of watching soccer I've grown quite a bit in my understanding of the game, but I still learn something new every time I see a contest.

This will be my 11th World Cup, although it will be the first in which I have the opportunity to easily see all the games. Thank goodness the US sponsored the World Cup in 1994 which ushered in the deep TV coverage in America that most of us depend upon for our World Cup experience. This year the World Cup coverage is deeper than ever with TV, HD, mobile phone, and internet coverage. No matter where I am, I'll be able to tune into the World Cup and with my DVR and ESPN3.com, even if I absolutely can't tune in at that moment, I'll still be able to see the complete game and hear it announced in several languages should I decide to practice my fading German and French. I have push notifications coming to my cell phone to report half time and final scores as well as injury reports, cards, and substitutions. 

As part of the anticipation leading up to the World Cup, South Africa sponsored a music festival in Johannesburg. Although most of the audience clearly called South Africa home, there were flags from all over the world waving during the performances. The show brought out some emotional feelings as the camera panned the multi-racial crowd enjoying the same music, the same night air, and the same experiences without borders or animosity. This international spirit of cooperation embedded in international competition always brings a lump to my throat. I'm a sucker for the Olympics, Summer and Winter, and I truly love the World Cup. Within the confines of international rules governing these games, nations can compete, win or lose, and shake hands at the end to go on to another contest or go home. There are individual bad behaviors which mar the overall civilized nature of the month's games, but thankfully those are few and quickly dealt with.

I'll probably write a few more blogs about the World Cup, so forgive me this indulgence. But I can't emphasize enough the significance of this event. Soccer has many large stages, but none so large as the World Cup. As a soccer fan and a soccer mom, I have to celebrate these four weeks. But especially as a mom I'm thankful for an experience we share as a family. I love the hours of white knuckles, agony, and unfettered joy that a delicious World Cup game offers to young and old. It's better than a 3D movie, which by the way is probably how you'll watch the World Cup next time around on your personal mobile TV. Believe me . . . this World Cup has just begun and I can't wait until 2014 in Brazil.
 

Stealthy Healthy

Susan Boyd

Last week I had my annual doctor's appointment which means I actually saw her 18 months ago. You know how that goes. Good intentions don't always translate into action. Because I had some vitamin D deficiency and some low potassium, it got me thinking again about the snacks I provide before and after games to help boost the various electrolytes and vitamin levels that can deplete with heavy activity and loss of fluids. While there are sport drinks which concentrate on three electrolytes levels and carbohydrates through sugars, they don't cover everything. Young players, to perform at top health and ability, need regular vitamins, fiber, and calcium in addition to common electrolytes and carbohydrates. No drink can give them all they need, so adding some healthy before and after game snacks makes sense.

We all hear about potassium and the important role it plays in helping muscles to fire. The stand-by for potassium has been bananas, which are a good source of potassium, but not the best. In fact on the scale of the best foods which give a potassium boost, bananas hold the bottom place. What they do offer is potassium without sodium, a huge bonus since several potassium-rich foods also contain a fair amount of sodium. A better alternative would be a snack box of raisins which provide 1020 mg of potassium as compared to 400 mg from a banana, and they only have 60 mg of sodium. Sultanas have even less sodium, 20 mg, and 1050 mg of potassium, but they are usually more difficult to find and not as appealing to young players. If your children like fresh apricots, then that's the ultimate potassium provider with 1380 mg of potassium and only 15 mg of sodium. They need to eat four apricots to get those benefits, so they had better love them!

Children need energy from carbohydrates, but like everything in life, there are good and bad varieties. You'll want carbs that aren't easily digested. These will usually come from foods high in fiber content and not processed.   For example, fresh oranges have half the sugar and twice the fiber of orange juice. As a rule of thumb for fruits and vegetables those with vibrant colors indicate more nutritional benefits. Additionally, since vegetables are usually a hard sell, I found that color did encourage my children to at least try a taste so I opted for red, yellow, and orange peppers rather than the standby green ones.   They usually cost more, but if the children eat them, the expense is worth it.  If you go green then the darker and richer the green, the more vitamins and nutrients contained within. One great source of carbohydrates on the way to or from a game is graham crackers. You need to be sure that these are made with graham and whole wheat rather than refined bleached flour. Usually the whole wheat flour has been fortified with vitamin B 1 and B 2, another nutritional plus. They also come in a low-fat option that does have a bit more sugar for taste. 

Granola bars can be a source of both carbohydrates and fiber, but be careful of the refined sugar content. Even though a chocolate covering can make a bar palatable for children used to sugary cereals and drinks, it negates the benefits the bars provide. Reading labels, now that the government requires significant detail in the explanations, can insure you get the healthiest option. If you use granola bars as a team snack, be sure you check for nut allergies since many bars either contain nuts or are manufactured in a factory that has nuts on the premises. When you find a good bar, you can't beat the convenience of throwing a few in a purse or backpack to curb a child's hunger after a game.

Calcium often goes hand in hand with fat, so you need to find sources that have a low fat option. Milk is high in calories, so it's not the best source for calcium. In fact all the dairy family of products offer good sources of calcium, but need to be consumed in moderation. I grew up in a household that drank whole milk like water, not very heart-healthy. To this day, the best I can do is 2% milk because I grew up with a beverage that didn't let light through the glass. I have opted for calcium enriched orange juice, which has natural sugars, but no fat. Other sources of calcium are leafy vegetables, again a hard sell for children, but some will eat broccoli. We called it "tree" and even today the children still call it that. For convenience you can turn to the low-fat yogurts in a tube, but again read the label carefully to avoid those yogurts high in sugar and fat. The advantage of the tubes is that they can be frozen and become a healthy alternative to ice cream bars. They also make a wonderful team snack.

There's a great resource on the internet provided by Harvard School of Public Health that details not only high-quality nutrition options, but also has recipes and links to other information (http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/). Another resource is Everyday Health (http://www.everydayhealth.com/) which has a wonderful and clear guide to the nutritional and caloric contents of many fresh and packaged foods. Additional manufacturers provide the nutritional information for their products on their websites which you can locate through a search. That way you can compare labels in the comfort of your easy chair before heading out to the grocery. Ultimately no source can supplement the information you glean from your personal physician who knows your family's health and what will benefit it best. So be sure to check with him or her if you have any concerns or questions.

We can provide healthy snacks before and after games that supply the necessary nutrients a young athlete needs. Sports drinks can replenish some of those elements, but not all. Children need to have the broad spectrum of vitamins, minerals, electrolytes, carbohydrates, proteins, and even fats to operate their bodies at optimal levels. As parents, we can pack a pretty good pre- and post-game variety of foods that meet the requirements of good health and good taste. 
             
 
 

Specialize in One Sport?

Sam Snow

The executive director for US Youth Soccer, Jim Cosgrove, was interviewed for an article for the May issue of SportsEvents Magazine on the issue of kids specializing in one sport -- and sometimes a single position – at a very young age (8-13). I think you'll be interested in the questions and comments.
 
1. Are you seeing a lot of kids specializing in one sport at an early age? If so, has this been increasing, decreasing or stayed about the same over the past few years?
JC: Yes there are children being asked to specialize in one sport and even one position early in their careers. My educated estimation is that the number of kids specializing early has increased over the last five years as participation in youth sports has increased over that time.
 
2. If you are seeing this trend, why do you think it is happening?
JC: The trend occurs because parents and/or coaches believe it will accelerate the youngster's development. They use examples from individual sports such as golf or gymnastics where early specialization can be appropriate and they apply that model to team sports. All team sports are classified as long-term development sports, so children should not specialize in only one sport until perhaps the late teenage years.
 
3. What do you consider to be the pros and cons of early specialization in sports?
JC: I cannot think of any pros to early specialization. The cons include poor athletic development, over-use injuries, emotional exhaustion and psychosocial burn-out. The too much-too soon syndrome also causes a jaded attitude toward the sport to develop by the mid to late teens.
 
4. At what age is specialization a good thing?
JC: Sports specialize too early in an attempt to attract and retain participants. 17-years-old and beyond is appropriate for specialization in a single sport. For soccer, position versatility is still important even at this age and especially for field players.
 
5. Can you provide some common sense recommendations to parents (and kids) who may believe that by focusing on one sport at a young age they will get college scholarships or become professional athletes?
JC: Approximately 2% of youth soccer players will earn a college scholarship to play soccer. Let your child play soccer to his or her content without an expectation for the big payoff of an athletic scholarship – there's much more money available for academic scholarships than athletic ones.
 
In conclusion, sports can be classified as either early or late specialization. Early specialization sports include artistic and acrobatic sports such as gymnastics, diving, and figure skating. These differ from late specialization sports in that very complex skills are learned before maturation since they cannot be fully mastered if taught after maturation.

Most other sports are late specialization sports. However, all sports should be individually analyzed using international and national normative data to decide whether they are early or late specialization.  If physical literacy is acquired before maturation, athletes can select a late specialization sport when they are between the ages of 12 and 15 and have the potential to rise to international stardom in that sport.

Specializing before the age of 10 in late specialization sports contributes to:
• One-sided, sport-specific preparation
• Lack of ABC's, the basic movement and sports skills
• Overuse injuries
• Early burnout
• Early retirement from training and competition

For late specialization sports, specialization before age 10 is not recommended since it contributes to early burnout, dropout and retirement from training and competition (Harsanyi, 1985).