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Coaches Blog

Sam's Blog is a bi-weekly addition to the US Youth Soccer Blog. Sam Snow is the Coaching Director for US Youth Soccer.

 

Taking a knee

Sam Snow

This week's question concerns the irregular habit of all of the players on the field of play taking a knee when another player goes down with an injury.

Hey guys, I'm currently coaching a girls U8 travel team. I've played soccer as a kid, played in college, managed a junior college men's team as well as trained club teams in the New York Hudson Valley area. Currently a concern for my team is understanding that taking a knee for an injured player is not required but a courtesy. Personally I don't agree with taking a knee and would rather group the players together, reiterate where they are in the game and clap for the player. The players also get tight and are more likely to cramp. I'm not sure I never did it and don't think it's disrespectful not to take a knee.

The action to take knee when a player is injured is not required in the Laws of the Game. However, it has become a bit of a local habit in some youth soccer circles (a spillover from gridiron football). The better procedure would be that if the referee has stopped the match for an injury to have the rest of the players to go to the touchline in front of their team bench, but do not leave the field of play, and get a drink of water. If the coach is not involved with the care of the injured player, then he or she may have a BRIEF word with the players (during this moment in the game the coach must remain in the technical area). But a coach must be very careful here to not get across more than one point. Too many coaches talk too much. It is more effective with children to be concise. Of course, if the injured player needs to come off the field, then the other players should recognize her or him with applause. This form of fair play should be expected of your players whether the injured player is from your team or the opposing team.

The action of recognizing with applause the injured player if she or he must come off is a stronger public showing of being good sports than taking a knee. Hopefully, the players are taught that they do not need to stop automatically if a player is injured. The game plays on unless the referee calls for an injury time out. Having said that, it is also incumbent on the coach to teach players that if a player is badly injured and the referee has not seen the player on the ground and has not stopped play then the players should play the ball out over the touchline.

The team in possession of the ball should put the ball out of bounds. The referee can then let on the medical staff to care for the injured player. Once play is resumed with a throw-in for U-10 and older teams or a pass-in for U-6 and U-8 teams, the team awarded the restart should give the ball back to the opponents if they were the team who played the ball out to care for an opposing injured player. If the team who played the ball out of bounds did so for their own injured player then the team taking the throw-in or pass-in may keep possession, but should put the ball back into play by sending it back toward their defensive third. Fair play then resumes from there.

Of course THE most respectful recognition of the injured player is not applause or taking a knee but a personal kind word from one player to another.
 

Competitive Summer

Susan Boyd

Every summer offers some exciting soccer competition. Occasionally that competition only comes along every four years, so don't miss the Women's World Cup which began yesterday in Germany.

The US Women are playing in Group C with North Korea, Sweden, and Colombia. Their first game is Tuesday, June 28, at 12:15 p.m. ET on ESPN/ESPN3.com/Galavision. The quarterfinals will be July 9 and 10 with Group C playing the latter date at either 7 a.m. ET (1st place team in group) or 11:30 a.m. ET (2nd place team in group) on ESPN. Semi-finals will be July 13 and finals will be July 17. In fact every single game of the World Cup will be broadcast on ESPN or ESPN2 with several games also broadcast in Spanish on Galavision. These weeks offer the opportunity for young soccer players, both girls and boys, to watch some top level competition.

Although I would normally encourage young soccer players to be outdoors in the summer practicing and playing the game, I make an exception here and suggest players pick a few games to watch during the week. Students of the game improve their play significantly by understanding the overall dynamics that teams develop and use. Watching how teams both attack and defend, how individual players move with and off the ball, and how plays develop absolutely augment a young person's soccer education. Print off the schedule at ESPN.com and highlight some games to enjoy.
 
Speaking of competition, this year's U.S. Youth Soccer National Championship will be held in Phoenix, Arizona at Reach II Sports Complex July 26 through July 31. The top boys and girls teams in age groups U-14 through U-19 will compete for national honors. Regions III and IV have already selected their participants, Region II does so this week in the Fox Cities area of Wisconsin, and Region I will wrap things up next week in Lancaster, Pa. These competitions showcase some of the future talent in soccer, so if you live nearby you should try to see some games especially those in your own player's age group.

We don't get the complete picture of what our players can aspire to until we step outside of our own leagues and our usual competitors to see the next level of play. Because America doesn't have the same immersion in soccer that most of the rest of the world experiences, we can miss out on how physical, intelligent, and fast soccer can be. One thing I remember from the first Region II Championship I attended was the speed of play and the fitness of the players. Each time I watch the best youth teams compete I gain a greater appreciation of how athletic and smart soccer players need to be to play at the top levels.
 
Weekly competitions in Major League Soccer can be seen either live or in delayed broadcasts on a large number of television outlets. Fans can now watch just about every single MLS game on channels such as ESPN, Fox Soccer Channel, GolTV, and Direct Kick. Additionally several of the games of the Women's Professional Soccer league can be seen on Fox and Time-Warner Cable Sports. This expansion of TV markets shows the increased interest in and influence of soccer in America. Soccer families should get in the habit of watching both U.S. and International soccer since those matches provide a great road map through the world of soccer skills and tactics. Watching soccer together as a family validates your child's choice of the sport and provides a topic for discussion that everyone can share in.

Even though most youth soccer players have a break from the sport for some of the summer, it doesn't mean that players can't be developing in other ways. Take some time this season to enjoy soccer matches on TV. You'll find yourself getting excited about certain teams and players. That enthusiasm can be a driving force to get you and your kids more invested in the sport and to help your kids improve their game through example. Use some of the best competition this summer to raise the bar both on playing and enjoying the game.
 

Honorable Position

Susan Boyd

Hold me back!  Every time I hear about youth teams, coaches, players, and/or parents putting winning ahead of development and ethics I get crazy.  Mike Woitalla in his blog last week in Soccer America told the story of a Nebraska team who facilitated the victory of its opponent, another team from his club, so that they could go on to the state championship competition.  The coach directed his team to allow the opponents to score a goal at the end of 0-0 tie giving the opponent the win which propelled them through to the state championship games.  He knew his team couldn't advance regardless of the outcome, but he also knew that the opposing team from his club would advance with a win.   These machinations came to light when the coach told the opponent's coach of his actions.  I'm sure he expected a big thank you, but to the coach's credit she reported the incident.
               
Now the entire process has been thrown into a tizzy requiring a replay of the games among the three teams contending for a spot in the finals.  Worse several dozen girls were thrown into an ugly situation.  The girls on the team who allowed the goal were put in the position of being asked to do something unethical by their coach, the girls on the "winning" team were put in the position of moving on to the finals knowing that it wasn't directly their skill that advanced them, and the girls on the other teams in contention to advance to the finals were denied the honest opportunity to advance.  Peripherally there are parents, officials, club board members, and state association staff who have been tainted by this action.  We can talk about other factors which have affected the outcomes of games such as bad refereeing or weather delays, but these factors come from within the agreed upon parameters of the game.   We need to accept, begrudgingly sometimes, that soccer games have variants which we can't control but can ultimately affect the outcome of a game.
               
We all know the heartbreak of having a goal called back because of a questionable offside call or a player receiving a second yellow card for flimsy reasons leaving her team a player short.  But these are part and parcel of a human game where subjectivity can be carefully managed but still affect the results of a game.  We tolerate mistakes of human nature because we recognize those mistakes can harm our results sometimes and then boost our results other times.  We don't like it when we lose because of a bad call or a small field, but we know that the next game may have factors that benefit our team.
               
Given the limitations of perfection in any game, at least we all know that the rules attempt to insure fairness.  Maximum ages of players are established and enforced rigorously with birth certificates and player passes, referees have to achieve a certain level of expertise to officiate, coaches must be licensed appropriately for the age level of their team, rules have been written and approved for play, equipment must adhere to standards, and all players must be registered with their club or have appropriate guest player certification.  State associations and governing agencies such as U.S. Youth Soccer Association carefully set forth rules and guidelines for play in youth soccer.  But beyond those official guidelines are the societal ethical guidelines we all understand exist.
               
We can recognize fairly easily when we are operating outside of the boundaries of ethics.  As much as the coach wanted to help his fellow club team, he absolutely knew that doing anything proactively would not be proper.  Asking his players to participate in this behavior put them in a terrible quandary:  Do they support their coach (and club) or do they stick by their own moral compass?  I observed a game once where the coach realized that his team would go through to the finals win or lose, but that the club's archrival team would not advance if his team's opponent won.  So he directed his players to score two own goals to assure the victory of his opponent and thereby seal the doom of his archrival.  I observed attempts to falsify age documents, to play kids who were not on the roster by having them use a rostered player's pass, and to engineer goal differentials.  Most of you have probably observed some improprieties in play, and some of you and/or your children may have been involved in some improprieties.  It's not a great position to be in.
               
As parents we need to reinforce that our kids shouldn't participate in an activity, even one directed by a respected adult, which is outside of the rules of the game.  We also need to reinforce that winning at any cost isn't the goal of soccer.  It's difficult when you can get so close you can taste victory and yet see it slip away.  And it's tempting to help that victory along with questionable assistance.  But we have to resist that urge as parents, coaches, and players.  You can't be truly triumphant when you know that a win was achieved outside of the rules everyone agrees to follow.  Our children need to learn that integrity is the real victory in life.  As a society we are programmed to be winners.  We want the best grades, the biggest house, to beat the car at the light, to get the best deal on a TV, and to send our kids to the top university.  We find it difficult to be content with our normal success and to accept losses along the way.  We attach our self-worth to winning, forgetting that wins don't insure satisfaction.  Living our lives with honor and enjoyment brings the real triumphs of contentment and pride.
 

Team Captain

Sam Snow

Not long ago I was asked about the process of selecting a team captain in youth soccer. The question and comments were this:
 
I have been coaching youth soccer since I was in college back in 1983. I have taken the National Youth Soccer Course, have various other certifications and regularly attend coaching clinics. I have coached several Travel Teams and recreational teams from ages ranging from U6 to U18. I also coached an adult Women's recreation team for six years until two years ago when I stopped coaching. Nevertheless, I am still my town's youth soccer club's vice president. I currently manage my 14 year-old daughter's Travel Team, but I am not the coach. I have a son who plays high school soccer and a younger daughter who plays both U11 Travel and Premiere soccer.
 
In my twenty-seven years of coaching, I have never appointed or had elections for team captains. Instead I have always used a game captain approach beginning around the U11 age group to reward improved play and to give all the children a taste of being a game captain during the season. While I have researched and I understand the utility and benefits of having team Captains at the high school level and above, I firmly believe that it is inappropriate in youth soccer. Recently, my daughter's U11 Travel Coach held elections and appointed two team captains based upon this vote. Her Premier Team does not have Team Captains, but uses a similar game captain approach that I use.
 
All of the parents of the children on the team were very surprised that the coach did this. Indeed, they are all looking to me for direction based on my experience and as the club's vice president on whether to approach the coach about our collective disagreement with the use of Team Captains. I have always also believed that other than when asked by the coach that I do not interfere with a coach's decision unless in my role as a board member to enforce disciplinary action. I am very interested in US Youth Soccer's views on the use of team captains in youth soccer and whether you can direct me to some articles on the subject.
 
US Youth Soccer does not have an official policy on identifying or selecting the team captain or captains. We feel the decision is up to the club to make. If the club does not have a policy in place for the various age groups in the club on the function and selection of captains then the club director of coaching should devise one. From the US Youth Soccer Coaching Department we recommend giving all of the players the opportunity to be the captain at least once per season not just in matches but in training sessions too. That should take place with the U8 to the U14 age groups. The U6 age group does not need team captains in any manner. The U16 and older age groups should have captains voted upon by the players and accredited by the coaching staff. I like these suggestions from Eric McGrath.
 
How to Pick Captains for a Soccer Team
By Eric McGrath, eHow Contributor
 
When looking to create a good team bond from a disparate group of soccer players, it is a good idea for the coach to select good captains in order to maintain discipline in the group, to relay tactical developments during a game, and to keep movement from exercise to exercise as efficient as possible. This article looks at some ideas on selecting the right personnel for this important role in any soccer team.
 
Look within the group for natural leaders. Sometimes these players will lead quietly by example with their behavior and level of play; other times they will be strong vocal personalities. Either way, these personality types will be the most obvious choice for a captaincy.
 
Decide whether the team will have one captain or many captains…
 
Decide whether the captains, if more than one, will be co-captains or a head-captain and a vice-captain. Again, the larger the squad, the more sensible it is to delegate leadership to more than one person. Conversely, for a smaller squad, it probably makes sense to have two co-captains or one head captain and a vice-captain.
 
Observe all possible candidates for captain's roles, and judge them on their presence in the team, the reaction of their teammates towards them, and the methods they use to exert their natural authority on their teammates.
 
Once a decision has been reached, announce the captains at an opportune time when every player is present. Explain the reasons why the specific player or players were chosen, and make sure everyone on the team supports the decision.