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The 50/50 Blog

Note:  Opinions expressed on the US Youth Soccer Blog (web log) are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the positions of the United States Youth Soccer Association (US Youth Soccer). Links on this web log to articles do not necessarily imply agreement by the author or by US Youth Soccer with the contents of the articles. Links are provided to foster discussion of topics and issues. Readers should make their own evaluations of the contents of such articles.

 

The 50/50 Blog: 8.29.14

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Klinsmann names 22-man roster for friendly

 

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Jurgen Klinsmann was not kidding when he said he would be looking at some younger players at the start of the new cycle. Included in the roster is US Youth Soccer Alum Jordan Morris who was the Under-17 Boys Golden Ball winner at the 2012 US Youth Soccer National Championships. Read more.

 


 

Ronaldo named 2013/2014 UEFA Best Player in Europe

 

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The Portugal captain received the 2013/14 accolade at the Grimaldi Forum in Monaco from UEFA President Michel Platini. Read more here.

 


 

UEFA Champions League Draw

 

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If you missed the Champions League draw yesterday see what teams will be matched up in this year's season. Read here.

 


 

Youth Soccer Month

 

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September is Youth Soccer Month! Make sure you check out our Youth Soccer Month website so that you are up-to-date with all that is happening.

 

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The 50/50 Blog: 8.27.14

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New York Red Bulls win first ever CCL match

 

 


 

Jermaine Jones practices with New England

 

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For Jermaine Jones, the New England Revolution’s desire to sign him was more than enough to convince him that the club should be his future home. Read more here.

 


 

Soccer America's College Top 25

 

 

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Check out who is in this week's men's and women's Soccer America College Top 25. Click here to find out.


 

One last USMNT game for Donovan

 

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Landon Donovan has not yet played in his final match for the U.S. Men’s National Team, but now we know when that final match will be. Read more here.

 

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The 50/50 Blog: 8.26.14

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Juggling

 

See? All that juggling you practice can pay off to help you score!

 


 

MLS Goals of the Week

 

 

There were some great goals this week in the MLS. Vote for your favorite.

 


 

Tim Howard the author

 

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U.S. World Cup goalkeeper Tim Howard has parlayed his success into a book deal with HarperCollins Publishers, which will publish his memoir, "The Keeper," due out on Dec. 9. Read more here.

 


 

Saving a life

 

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Ok. This isn't soccer news. But everyone should enjoy this feel good story about a USC football player jumping from a balcony to save his nephew from drowning. Read it here.

 

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The Unconquerable Soul

Susan Boyd

When it comes to the Little League World Series, the boys of summer are actual boys and girls. Over the years, this youth event’s exposure has evolved from a small paragraph in the sports section announcing the final results of the competition to a professionally produced televised sporting event on ESPN. Most people are well-aware of the league and its August competition in Williamsport, Pa. My brothers, who weren’t really into athletics, participated in Little League because that’s what boys did in the summer. My sons played baseball but never participated in Little League because our town didn’t have teams, much to the frustration of many families who viewed the league as prestigious. Last summer, our oldest grandson’s team won the honor to go to its regional but was eliminated in a tough final game. They came that close to going to the World Series – and you only get one chance. In two more summers, his little brother’s team will attempt to qualify. People see it as a significant badge of honor in the world of youth sports.    

Lots of powerful stories have come from this year’s event. Mo’Ne Davis, a girl, mows them down from the pitcher’s mound. The first all-black team, Jackie Robinson West from Chicago, has come out of an urban initiative that Little League instituted to rejuvenate youth baseball in the inner cities of America. Having watched my grandson compete, I know how seriously kids take the sport and the opportunity to appear on a world stage. Such exposure brings great ego boosts, but public defeats bring great despair. Only one team will survive to win the trophy and they will leave 15 teams in their wake.

In my humble view, the most powerful story to come out of the tournament came from a loss. The Cumberland Americans from Rhode Island were defeated by Jackie Robinson West and with that defeat were eliminated from the competition. Any loss is tough, but for 11 to 13 year-olds, it can seem like the end of the world. Their limited life experience doesn’t give them the broad context to put the loss in perspective. They don’t see a future beyond the loss and they feel so personally culpable in creating it. Enter Coach Dave Belisle, who gathered his team after the defeat and gave a spontaneous speech that represents the character every coach should possess. I think the speech is so great I’m going to present it here in its entirety thanks to the Providence Journal. As you read it, consider if you could be so composed, positive and supportive in the face of a heartbreaking loss. Consider if you as a parent or a coach rise to the level established here.

 “Heads up high. Heads up high. I’ve gotta see your eyes, guys. There’s no disappointment in your effort — in the whole tournament, the whole season. It’s been an incredible journey.

“We fought. Look at the score – 8-7, 12-10 in hits. We came to the last out. We didn’t quit. That’s us! Boys, that’s us!

“The only reason why I’ll probably end up shedding a tear is that this is the last time I’m going to coach you guys. But I’m going to bring back with me, the coaching staff is going to bring back, you guys are going to bring back that no one other team can provide – that’s pride. Pride.

“You’re going to take that for the rest of your lives, what you provided for the town of Cumberland. You had the whole place jumping, right? You had the whole state jumping. You had New England jumping. You had ESPN jumping. OK?

“You want to know why? They like fighters. They like sportsmen. They like guys who don’t quit. They like guys who play the game the right way. If everyone would play baseball like the Cumberland Americans, this would be the greatest game.

“The lessons you guys have learned along the journey, you’re never going to forget. We’re going to have some more fun. We have two more days of fun. When you walk around this ballpark in the next couple of days, they’re going to look at you and say: “Hey, you guys were awesome!’

“Everybody has said: You guys are awesome. Awesome. Awesome. Absolutely awesome.

“It’s OK to cry, because we’re not going to play baseball together anymore. But we’re going to be friends forever. Friends forever. Our Little League careers have ended on the most positive note that could ever be. OK? Ever be.

“There’s only going to be one team that’s going to walk out of here as World Series champions. Only one. We got down to the nitty-gritty. We’re one of the best teams in the world. Think about that for a second. In the world! Right?

“So, we need to go see our parents, because they’re so proud of you. One more thing. I want a big hug. I want everyone to come in here for one big hug. One big hug, then we’re going to go celebrate. Then we’re going to go back home to a big parade.

“I love you guys. I’m gonna love you forever. You’ve given me the most precious moment in my athletic and coaching career, and I’ve been coaching a long time – a looooong time. I’m getting to be an old man. I need memories like this, I need kids like this. You’re all my boys. You’re the boys of summer.

“So, for the last time, we’re going to yell Americans: One, two three – Americans!”

“OK. Good job. Let’s go. Time to go.”

I can’t read this speech without misting up.  As Matt Lauer said on the Today show, “Coach I know what you can do when the summer is over – open a school for coaches and parents.” I second that opinion. Youth sports, even when they end up at the highest competition, should always be about three things: Fun, sportsmanship and pride. It shouldn’t be about winning. Winning can happen and can be a goal, but only within the framework of those three elements. Pride shouldn’t come solely from a win but from games well-played, from even small improvements, from building friendships, and from doing one’s best representing the team, the family, and the community. A win is meaningless if it is gained at the expense of the self-respect of good sportsmanship. And a win that comes from anger, brow-beating, destruction of self-esteem, and blame ceases to be fun and ceases to be of significant value in the formative years of youth sports. A team can be competitive, can set high goals, can triumph and still retain fun, sportsmanship and pride. Coach Belisle’s speech shows how that’s possible.  I’m in awe of the man. His off-the-cuff, heartfelt, and meaningful speech provides a standard each of us should try to achieve. He gave those kids a true unconquerable soul.

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